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Contents

Books and Documents

Contents

FOREWORD

PREFACE 

Chapter

I     Leishmaniasis (Harry Most, M.D.) 

Part I. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

Clinical Aspects 
Diagnosis 
Treatment 

Part II. Visceral Leishmaniasis

Preclinical History 
Clinical Aspects at Onset 
Differential Diagnosis 
Diagnosis 
Treatment and Response 
Blood Studies 
Liver Function 
Renal Complications 
Case Histories 

II     Coccidioidomycosis (Roger O. Egeberg, M.D.) 

Historical Note 
Causative Agent 
Symptomatology 
Laboratory Examinations 
Clinical Course 
Observation and Experience 
Pathology 
Coccidioidomycosis in the Army Air Forces 
Coccidioidomycosis in the Army Ground Forces 
Coccidioidomycosis in Prisoners of War

III     Schistosomiasis Japonica (Frederik B. Bang, M.D., and F. Tremaine Billings, Jr., M.D.)

Introduction on Leyte 
The Disease Picture 
Symptoms, Physical Findings, and Early Course 
Laboratory Findings 
Picture of the Disease in Patients Evacuated to Zone of Interior 
Treatment and Results 
Summary 

IV     Filariasis (Joseph M. Hayman, Jr., M.D.) 

Historical Note 
Definition 
Causative Agent 
Geographic Distribution 
Transmission 
Course 
Incidence 
Discussion of Epidemic
Unit Histories 
Diagnosis 
Preventive Measures 
Conclusions 

V     Helminthiasis (Harry Most, M.D.) 

Hookworm Infections 
Other Parasitic Infections 
Summary 

VI     Bullis Fever (John C. Woodland, M.D.) 

Clinical Manifestations 
Physical Findings 
Laboratory Findings 
Clinical Course 
Experimental Laboratory Studies 

VII     Sarcoidosis (Max Michael, Jr., M.D.) 

Clinical Picture 
Diagnosis 
Treatment and Disposition 
Followup Studies 

VIII     Allergy (Walter L. Winkenwerder, M.D.) 

Statistical Data
Clinical Data 
Summary and Conclusions 

IX     Heat Casualty (Ludwig M. Eichna, M.D.) 

Environmental Temperature 
Incidence
Cause and Prevention 
Treatment 
Deterioration Due To Heat
Hypohidrosis Syndrome 
Conclusion 

X     Nutritional Disorders (Herbert Pollack, M.D.)

Perspectives and Preliminaries
The Ration Tests 
Special Problems in the Field 
Recovered Allied Military Personnel, European Theater 
Story of Imprisonment 
Principal Syndromes-Description and Management 
    Nutrition in Civilian Populations, European Theater, and in Concentration Camps 
Nutrition of the German Prisoners of War 
Malnutrition in the Far East 
Conclusion 

XI     Diabetes Mellitus (Alexander Marble, M.D.) 

Observations at Induction Stations 
Incidence, Disposition, and Mortality 
Diabetic Coma 
Nondiabetic Glycosuria 
Treatment of Diabetes in the Army 
The Place of the Diabetic in the Army 

XII     Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract (Herrman L. Blumgart, M.D., and Louis Zetzel, M.D.) 

Organization and Early Findings 
Peptic Ulcer 
Fifth U.S. Army Gastrointestinal Clearing Center 
Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 
Gastritis and Gastroscopy 

XIII     Viral Hepatitis (W. Paul Havens, Jr., M.D.) 

Serum Hepatitis 
Infectious Hepatitis 
Experimental Studies With Hepatitis Viruses 

XIV     Nephritis (John P. Merrill, M.D.) 

Glomerulonephritis 
Incidence 
Types 
Summary 

XV     Diseases of the Blood and Blood-Forming Organs (Maurice B. Strauss, M.D.) 

Severe Anemia 
Hookworm Infection
Eosinophilia 
Malaria 
Infectious Mononucleosis 
Agranulocytosis 
Nitrogen Mustards 
Atomic Bomb and Aplastic Anemia 

XVI     Heart Disease (Edward F. Bland, M.D.) 

Selection for Service 
Infections and Deficiencies 
Hypertension 
Coronary Disease 
Neurocirculatory Asthenia
Wounds and Foreign Bodies 
Summary 

XVII     Peripheral Vascular Disorders (Fiorindo A. Simeone, M.D., and Robert W. Hopkins, M.D.) 

Centers for Vascular Injury and Disease 
Acute Vascular Injuries 
Posttraumatic Arterial Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Fistulas 
Cold Injury 
Thromboangiitis Obliterans 
Arteriosclerosis Obliterans 
Arterial Embolism 
Raynaud's Disease 
Venous Disease 
Hemorrhoidal Varices 
Summary 

XVIII     Rheumatic Diseases (Richard T. Smith, M.D.) 

Centers for Rheumatic Diseases 
Epidemiology 
Statistical Data 
Clinical Picture 
Problems of Diagnosis 
Treatment of the Rheumatic Diseases 
Reconditioning 
Rehabilitation 
Training 
Clinical Investigation
Summary 

XIX     Peripheral Neuritis (George D. Gammon, M.D.)

Part I. Clinical Experience

Differential Diagnosis 

Part II. Description and Comparison of Syndromes

Diphtheritic Neuritis 
Infectious Polyneuritis: The Guillain-Barré Syndrome 
Postinfection Neuritides 
Peripheral Neuropathy, Mostly Peroneal and Axillary, Cause Unknown 
Postvaccination Neuritis 
Neuritides Caused by Toxic Agents 
Starvation Neuritides 
Special Problems in Differential Diagnosis 
Conclusion 

XX     Dermatology (Donald M. Pillsbury, M.D., and Clarence S. Livingood, M.D.)

Part I. Administrative Considerations

General Considerations 
Evolution of Dermatologic Management 
Consultants in Dermatology 
Personnel and Assignment 
Facilities, Equipment, and Supplies 
Army Air Forces 
Distribution and Administrative Management of Skin Diseases in Zone of Interior
Distribution and Administrative Management of Skin Diseases in Oversea Commands 

Part II. Clinical Considerations

Fungal Infections
Bacterial Diseases 
Dermatitis Venenata 
Psoriasis
Parasitic Infections 
Other Dermatoses 
Lichenoid and Eczematoid Dermatitis (Atabrine Dermatitis, Atypical Lichen Planus) 

XXI     Psychosomatic Medicine (Colonel Albert J. Glass, MC, USA (Ret.)) 

Part I. During Selection for Military Service

The Psychosomatic Approach 
The First Year 
Reevaluation of Induction Standards 
Revised Standards 

Part II. During Training and Service in the Zone of Interior

Psychosomatic Disorders During Training 
Medical Discharge 
Policy of Maximum Utilization 

Part III. During Oversea and Combat Duty

Combat Fatigue 
Other Problems 
Scrub Typhus and Other Infections 
Gastrointestinal Disorders 
Summary 

Illustrations

1.    Types of fever in untreated kala-azar, and response to specific therapy
2.    Response of temperature to four courses of treatment 
3.    Enlargement of liver and spleen in patients with kala-azar, and response to treatment
3a.  Enlargement of liver and spleen in patients with kala-azar, and response to treatment (cont.)
4.    Course of serum proteins, with results of formol-gel test and cephalin flocculation before, during, and after specific antimony treatment
5.    Correlation of serum globulin and result of formol-gel test 
6.    Effect of albumin on the formol-gel reaction
7.    Electrophoretic pattern of sera from two cases of active kala-azar
8.    Early changes in the red and white blood counts in active kala-azar
9.    Hematological response to treatment 
10.  White blood counts before and after treatment 
11.   Sputum culture of C. immitis on Sabouraud's medium 
12.   Microscopic appearance of old culture of C. immitis 
13.   Development of coccidioidal spherules 
14.   Coverslip preparation showing spherule 
15.   Skin granulomata on forehead
16.   Cystlike areas of destruction in the distal tibia, malleoli, and talus 
17.   Progressive coccidioidomycosis
18.   Progressive coccidioidomycosis 
19.   Progressive coccidioidomycosis
20.   Progressive coccidioidomycosis 
21.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
22.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
23.   Primary coccidioidomycosis
24.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
25.   Primary coccidioidomycosis
26.   Primary coccidioidomycosis
27.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
28.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
29.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
30.   Primary coccidioidomycosis 
31.   Progressive coccidioidomycosis 
32.   Tissue section of coccidioidal granuloma
33.   Clinical course of schistosomiasis japonica, acute, moderately severe
34.   Clinical course of schistosomiasis japonica, acute, moderately severe 
35.   Schistosome dermatitis-papular eruption on back 
36.   Clinical course of schistosomiasis japonica, mild 
37.   Clinical course of schistosomiasis japonica, acute, severe, with involvement of the central nervous system 
38.   Attitudes of beriberi, wet and dry, November 1942 
39.   Schematic diagram illustrating the clinical course of infectious hepatitis in an adult
40.   Photomicrograph, acute glomerulonephritis 
41.   Photomicrograph, acute glomerulonephritis 
42.   Roentgenogram of chest of 24-year-old male with bronchogenic carcinoma before therapy with nitrogen mustard 
43.   Roentgenogram of chest of 24-year-old male, 52 days later, after three courses of nitrogen mustard at intervals of 4 weeks 
44.   Roentgenogram of chest of 23-year-old male with Hodgkin's granuloma, before therapy with nitrogen mustard 
45.   Roentgenogram of chest of 23-year-old male, 2 months after a single course of 0.4 mg. of nitrogen mustard per kilogram of body weight
46.   Roentgenogram of chest of 29-year-old male with lymphosarcoma, before therapy with nitrogen mustard 
47.   Roentgenogram of chest of 29-year-old male, 2 weeks after a single course of 0.4 mg. of nitrogen mustard per kilogram of body weight 
48.   Photomicrograph of spleen of 24-year-old man who died 5 days after exposure to the atomic bomb 
49.   Photomicrograph of bone marrow of 39-year-old man who died 7 days after bombing 
50.   Photomicrograph of bone marrow of 29-year-old man who died 29 days after bombing 
51.   Photomicrograph of spleen of 35-year-old woman who died 19 days after bombing 
52.   Photomicrograph of bone marrow of 31-year-old man who died of bronchiectasis 14 weeks after bombing 
53.   Distribution of defects of the cardiovascular system in aircrew trainees 
54.   Photomicrograph, tsutsugamushi disease 
55.   Photomicrograph, diffuse myocarditis in tsutsugamushi disease 
56.   Electrocardiogram in severe malnutrition, showing broad high T waves and a long Q-T interval 
57.   Diagram of the operative findings in a patient with through-and-through perforation of the left ventricle
58.   Electrocardiograms during recovery from the through-and-through wounds of the left ventricle 
59.   Roentgenograms showing an embolic shell fragment in the left pulmonary artery 
60.   Roentgenograms showing the foreign body illustrated in figure 59, now lodged in the right pulmonary artery 
61.   Army and Navy General Hospital, Hot Springs, Ark 
62.   Members of the Medical Service, Rheumatic Disease Section, Army and Navy General Hospital, with Brig. Gen. Hugh J.  Morgan, Brig. Gen. Ralph H. Goldthwaite, and Col. Walter Bauer, MC, at a meeting, 22 January 1945, at the Army and Navy General Hospital 
63.   Card presented to each rheumatic patient upon completion of diagnosis, indicating which lectures to attend 
64.   Syphilitic lesions 
65.   Erythrasma or fungal infection of thighs 
66.   Acute tinea cruris 
67.   Typical acute dermatophytosis caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes
68.   Tinea corporis 
69.   Proved leishmaniasis of toe, with numerous Vincent's spirochets 
70.   Cutaneous leishmaniasis 
71.   Diphtheria of skin of foot 
72.   Scrub typhus with eschar
73.   Allergic dermatitis
74.   Allergic dermatitis 
75.   Severe fissuring bilateral keratosis of heels
76.   Epidermolysis bullosa 
77.   Hyperhidrosis of hands
78.   Typical dry tinea pedis caused by Trichophyton rubrun
79.   Typical dry tinea pedis caused by Trichophyton rubrun 
80.   Secondarily infected interdigital fungous infection 
81.   Symmetrical lividity of soles 
82.   Epidermophytosis with eczematoid dermatitis
83.   Phagendenic ulcer of lower leg in North African native 
84.   Recurrent erysipeloid infection of lower leg 
85.   Acne vulgaris
86.   Miliaria rubra 
87.   Reaction to poison ivy 
88.   Reaction to poison ivy 
89.   Reaction to Merthiolate applied before spinal puncture 
90.   Reaction to elastic in shorts 
91.   Drug eruptions 
92.   Dhobie mark dermatitis 
93.   Extensive acute psoriasis of trunk 
94.   Acute seborrheic dermatitis of suprapubic and crural region 
95.   Scabies 
96.   Scabies, with louse infestation and malnutrition 
97.   Scabies, with secondary infection, malnutrition, and edema 
98.   Psoriasis of soles 
99.   Congenital keratosis plantaris occurring at site of pressure 
100.  Psoriasis of palms 
101. Circinate tinea of buttocks 
102. Warts on fingers 
103. Wart on plantar surface of great toe 
104. Condyloma acuminatum of penis 
105. Painful X-ray atrophy and ulceration following excessive radiation for plantar wart 
106. Lichenoid dermatitis with secondary infection 
107. Lichenoid dermatitis with secondary infection 
108. Lichen planus 
109. Lichen planus affecting lip 
110. Eczematoid Atabrine dermatitis
110a. Eczematoid Atabrine dermatitis (cont.) 
111a. Lichenoid Atabrine dermatitis
111b. Lichenoid Atabrine dermatitis (cont.)
111c. Lichenoid Atabrine dermatitis (cont.)
112. Lichenoid Atabrine dermatitis 
113. Lichenoid Atabrine dermatitis 
114. Lichenoid lesions of mouth in Atabrine dermatitis
115. Atabrine dermatitis 
116. Pigmented patches in Atabrine dermatitis
117. Atabrine dermatitis, with papulosquamous lesions resembling pityriasis rosea 
118. Atabrine dermatitis, showing closeup of lesions which resemble pityriasis rosea
119. Chinese patient with severe generalized exfoliative dermatitis complicated by severe hepatitis and aplastic anemia
120. Atabrine dermatitis of eyelids
121. Atabrine dermatitis 
122. Nail changes in Atabrine dermatitis, 3 months after onset 
123. Atabrine dermatitis, showing hyperpigmentation and thickening of skin

Plates

I.     Duration of hepatitis, 36 days 
II.    Duration of hepatitis, 19 days and 43 days (Illustration) (Text)
III.   Duration of hepatitis, 19 days, 93 days, and 18 days (Illustration) (Text)
IV.   Duration of hepatitis, 36 days (Illustration) (Text)
V.    Clinical duration of hepatitis, 4 days, and representative areas of cut surfaces of livers (Illustration) (Text)
VI.   Duration of epidemic hepatitis, less than 1 day, and 3 days (Illustration) (Text)

Charts

1.    Incidence rates for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Persian Gulf Command, U.S. Army, 1943-45
2.    Weekly admissions for jaundice (essentially serum hepatitis) in the U.S. Army, continental United States, January-December 1942 
3.    Weekly admissions for jaundice (essentially serum hepatitis) in the U.S. Army overseas, January-December 1942 
4.    Incidence of aplastic anemia among U.S. Army troops, 1942-45
5.    Onset and duration of palatal paralysis, in weeks, after pharyngitis 
6.    Onset of paralysis of the palate, of accommodation, and of the extremities, in weeks, after pharyngitis
7.    Course of diphtheritic neuritis after pharyngitis, illustrating time of onset and duration of paralysis of palate, of accommodation, and of limbs 
8.    Time course of diphtheritic polyneuritis of extremities; time (in weeks) after onset when maximum disability was reached and when improvement began 

Tables

1.    Results of diagnostic procedures in 30 cases of proved kala-azar
2.    Results of treatment in 30 cases of proved kala-azar
3.    Summary of relative efficiency of drugs used in treatment of 30 proved cases of kala-azar 
4.    Serum proteins before any specific therapy in 19 cases of proved kala-azar 
5.    Serum proteins in relation to start of successful therapy in leishmaniasis 
6.    Calcium in serum and in ultrafiltrate of serum in leishmaniasis
7.    Leukocyte counts in 28 cases of proved kala-azar
8.    Blood counts before and after successful treatment of leishmaniasis, Moore General Hospital 
9.    Erythrocyte counts in 26 cases of proved kala-azar
10.  Hematological observations in seven cases of active kala-azar 
11.  Reticulocyte response to specific treatment in proved cases of kala-azar 
12.  Pretreatment sedimentation rate in 19 cases of proved kala-azar
13.  Incidence of symptoms in 75 patients with acute schistosomiasis japonica
14.  Incidence of important physical findings in 75 patients with acute schistosomiasis japonica 
15.  Incidence of symptoms in 18 patients with schistosomiasis japonica, involving the central nervous system
16.  Treatment schedule and results of treatment of patients infected with S. japonicum, using increasing amounts of trivalent antimony compounds
17.  Incidence of minor toxic symptoms of trivalent antimony compounds in patients with schistosomiasis japonica 
18.  Admissions for filariasis, U.S. Army, by area and year, 1942-45
19.  Results of skin tests for filariasis, 118th General Hospital, 1944 
20.  Comparison of results of skin tests for filariasis, overseas and Zone of Interior, 1944 
21.  Prevalence of parasitism in various groups of natives and prisoners, in tropical areas 
22.  Prevalence of parasitism in U.S. Army troops, oversea service and service in continental United States only 
23.  Attack rates for sarcoidosis for World War II servicemen, by race, and region of induction (residence) 
24.  Comparison of attack rates of sarcoidosis with those of Hodgkin's disease
25.  Disqualifications for military service due to allergic diseases, World War II
26.  Disqualifications for military service due to allergic diseases, and prevalence of these disqualifying diseases by age, World War II (November 1943 through December 1944)
27.  Admissions to hospitals and quarters for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1942-45 
28.  Admissions to hospitals and quarters for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1942
29.  Admissions to hospitals and quarters for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1943
30.  Admissions to hospitals and quarters for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1944
31.  Admissions to hospitals and quarters for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1945
32.  Admission rates for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1942-45 
33.  Admission rates for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1942
34.  Admission rates for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1943 
35.  Admission rates for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1944 
36.  Admission rates for selected diagnostic categories of allergic conditions in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1945
37.  Disability separations and retirements due to selected allergic disorders, U.S. Army, 1942-45
38.  Comparison of admissions and disability separations for selected allergic disorders, U.S. Army, 1942-45, inclusive 
39.  Climatic conditions in representative hot areas where U.S. troops were stationed 
40.  Maximal climatic conditions in representative areas, by location and closed spaces of installation 
41.  Admissions for ill effects of heat (excluding sunburn and burns), in U.S. Army, by area and month, 1942
42.  Admissions for ill effects of heat (excluding sunburn and burns), in U.S. Army, by area and month, 1943
43.  Admissions for ill effects of heat (excluding sunburn and burns), in U.S. Army, by area and month, 1944
44.  Summary of heat casualties in the United States, by area, installation, and unit, 1942-43 
45.  Deaths due to environmental heat, in U.S. Army, by area and cause of death, 1942-45 
46.  Incidence of heat casualty in U.S. Army Forces in Middle East, by area or command, from 1 July 1942 to 1 October 1943 
47.  Admissions and deaths for heat casualties among troops in the United States, by month and year, January-December, 1942, 1943, and 1944
48.  Heat casualties in Fourth Service Command, by station, 1 January-26 August 1942
49.  Stations in the United States reporting six or more casualties from ill effects of heat between 1 and 31 August 1944
50.  Water requirements for representative types of work in hot climates, by type of activity
51.  Prevalence of diabetes mellitus among registrants examined for military service, World War II.
52.  Disqualifications of registrants for military service due to diabetes mellitus by age and race, World War II
53.  Summary of data on diabetes (primary diagnosis), in World War II, 1941-45
54.  Admissions for diabetes mellitus among male enlisted personnel, U.S. Army, by race and year, 1941-45 
55.  Admissions for diabetes mellitus, U.S. Army, by rank and year, 1941-45
56.  Admissions for diabetes mellitus, U.S. Army, by age, 1944
57.  Incidence of diabetes in the U.S. Army, by area and year, 1944 
58.   Summary of data for nondiabetic glycosuria in World War II, by year 1941-45
59.  Days lost by cases admitted for diabetes, by year, 1942-45 
60.  Admissions for ulcer of the duodenum and stomach in the U.S. Army, pre-World War II and World War II, by area and year, 1937-41 and 1942-45, respectively 
61.  Percentage distribution of admissions for peptic ulcer in the U.S. Army, by type of disposition, 1942-45
62.  Average number of days lost per admission for peptic ulcer, 1945 
63.  Percentage of peptic ulcer in hospital patients with dyspepsia
64.  Differential diagnosis between peptic ulcer and psychogenic dyspepsia
65.  Admissions for infectious and serum hepatitis in the U.S. Army, by broad geographic area and by year, 1942-45
66.  Admission rates for infectious hepatitis and serum hepatitis among U.S. Army personnel at all medical treatment facilities in selected areas, 1942-45 
67.  Incidence of hepatitis among U.S. troops in the Mediterranean and Africa-Middle East theaters, 1942-45
68.  Results of administration, to volunteers, of materials obtained from patients in the acute phase of serum hepatitis 
69.  Results of administration, to volunteers, of materials obtained from patients in various stages of the incubation period and convalescence of serum hepatitis 
70.  Results of attempts to demonstrate immunity and cross-immunity in volunteers convalescent from experimentally induced serum hepatitis 
71.  Results of administration, to volunteers, of materials obtained from patients in the acute phase of infectious hepatitis
72.  Results of administration, to volunteers, of materials obtained from patients in various stages of the incubation period and convalescence of infectious hepatitis 
73.  Results of attempts to demonstrate immunity and cross-immunity in volunteers convalescent from experimentally induced infectious hepatitis, in 1946
74.  Comparison of behavior of viruses of infectious hepatitis and serum hepatitis in experimentally infected volunteers 
75.  Biological differences between glomerulonephritis and rheumatic fever
76.  Variations in incidence of nephritis following scarlet fever observed in four hospitals
77.  Admissions for nephritis in the U.S. Army, by area or theater and year, 1942-45
78.  Morbidity rates of rheumatic fever, nephritis, and certain streptococcal infections among U.S. Army personnel  stationed in selected areas, by year, 1942-45
79.  Deaths from nephritis in U.S. Army, by area and year, 1942-45 
80.  Indications for amputation among German, Russian, and American casualties, in World War II 
81.  Incidence of amputation following arterial injuries, U.S. Army casualties, World War II 
82.  Summary of preoperative and postoperative observations of 47 patients with arteriovenous fistulas 
83.  Incidence of cold injury in the U.S. Army (including the Army Air Forces), by specific diagnosis and theater, 1942-45
84.  Morbidity data on selected vascular diseases, U.S. Army, 1942-45
85.  Total admissions and admissions for rheumatic diseases, U.S. Army personnel, Army and Navy General Hospital, 1941-45 
86.  Number of Medical Service officers and bed allotments assigned to the Rheumatic Disease Section, Army and Navy General Hospital, 1942-45 
87.  Admission rates for rheumatic diseases in the U.S. Army, by theater or area, 1942-45
88.  Disqualification for military service because of rheumatic diseases in World War I and World War II (ages 20-24)
89.  Comparison of admission rates for rheumatic diseases (excluding rheumatic fever), World War I and World War II 
90.  Disposition of patients with arthritis in general hospitals in the Mediterranean theater, U.S. Army 
91.  Geographic distribution of admissions for arthritis and arthralgia in certain islands of the western Pacific, 1945 
92.  Disability separatio3ns, deaths, and noneffectiveness due to rheumatic diseases in the U.S. Army, 1942-45 
93.  Disposition of 1,300 soldiers with rheumatic disease, Rheumatism Center, Army and Navy General Hospital, 1945
94.  Incidence of the various rheumatic diseases based on the first 2,000 and 5,000 admissions to the Rheumatic Disease Section, Army and Navy General Hospital
95.  Comparison of incidence of various rheumatic diseases among first 2,000 cases at Army and Navy General Hospital and first 800 cases at Ashburn General Hospital 
96.  Differentiation between fibrositis and "psychogenic rheumatism" 
97.  Reclassification (final) diagnoses of neuropathies, U.S. Army personnel in Mediterranean theater, during World War II 
98.  Clinical classification and results of cultural and serologic studies of polyneuritis, Merano, Italy, July 1945 
99.  Week of onset of neurological involvement in 42 patients with diphtheria after pharyngitis
100. Distribution of the neurological involvement in diphtheritic polyneuritis (in percentage)
101. Rejections for skin diseases in 20,000 candidates for induction at U.S. Army Recruiting and Induction Station, Tacoma, Wash 
102. Proportionate distribution of skin diseases in Dermatology Clinic, ASF Regional Hospital, Camp Lee, Va., 1945 
103. Anatomic distribution of lichenoid papules and nodules in 118 patients with so-called atypical lichenoid planus 
104. Anatomic distribution of lesions of fully developed lichenoid and eczematoid dermatitis complex in 200 patients 
105. Estimated number of registrants found to be unqualified for general military service because of physical and mental defects