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Appendix D

Contents

APPENDIX D

A Summary of Venereal Disease Statistics During World War II

The methods of reporting venereal disease before and during the first part of World War II made it extremely difficult to determine true incidence rates. In the first place, many men were inducted into the Army who either had an undiagnosed infection or who developed the symptoms of a venereal disease very soon after induction. In these instances, the case was reported at time of diagnosis and charged against the Army rate. Secondly, there were many patients with chronic cases of venereal disease who were transferred from one Army hospital to another, and many of these patients were reported numerous times as representing new venereal infection. Beginning on 1 November 1942, infections acquired by soldiers before induction were not charged against the overall Army rate. Other measures were taken to prevent repeated reporting of the same case, and from this date on the actual rate per thousand men per year is believed to be fairly accurate. In addition, the statistical branch of the Venereal Disease Control Division prepared weekly and monthly statistical tables showing infection rates from venereal diseases, rates for noneffectiveness due to venereal diseases, and days lost per case of venereal disease, broken down by various service commands, theaters of operations, and so forth. This service was essential to the effective operation of the office and was continued throughout the war under the direction of Capt. Stanley Brooks Russell, MAC.

Under each of the various parts of chapter X, reference was made to certain statistics such as incidence rates, rates for noneffectiveness, and so forth, as they pertained to the material being discussed. It must be emphasized that these statistics were often tentative and based on whatever records were available during the war. Obviously, such data cannot be considered to be more than suggestive and were used primarily to indicate trends. They have been checked, whenever possible, by the Medical Statistics Division, Office of the Surgeon General, and have been revised, when necessary, to reflect the latest and most complete information available. Parts I and III of chapter X were reviewed to reflect data available as of December 1954. The data in parts II, IV, and V and in this appendix were checked in view of all information which had been gathered, analyzed, and summarized as of December 1956. In the latter instance, statistics compiled as a result of summarizing statistical health reports from the various commands were substituted for the less accurate statistics presented in other reports from these commands during the war.

The extent of error which will exist in the final statistics probably will never be known. It was recognized that many cases of venereal diseases were never diagnosed as such. It was also known that other cases were deliberately concealed and never carded for record, particularly during the period when punitive measures were in effect. No reliable studies were ever done to determine the actual extent of concealed cases, but various authorities have suggested that as much as 30 percent of venereal disease occurring in the U.S. Army in the continental United States was never known to the Army. The soldiers concerned obtained treatment through outside sources and, unless complications developed, were frequently able successfully to conceal their infection despite scheduled and unscheduled physical inspections.

It was doubted that the extremely low venereal disease rates for officers reflected the true situation because it was even less of a problem for officers to obtain outside


470

treatment or, in some instances, to be treated clandestinely at Army medical installations without being carded for record.

In order that some comprehensive estimate of venereal disease incidence and morbidity might be available in this volume, the tables which follow were prepared by the Medical Statistics Division, Office of the Surgeon General. In summary, it can be stated very simply that the lowest venereal disease rates in the U.S. Army occurred during 1943 and that the rates began to rise in 1944, further increased in 1945, and showed marked increases after the cessation of hostilities. The most striking factor, however, was that during this same period rates for noneffectiveness because of venereal disease, which had been very high in 1941 and 1942, dropped to new record lows by the end of the war in spite of increased incidence of the diseases. This decrease in noneffectiveness undoubtedly reflected the tremendous advances in treatment made during the war which are described in chapter X of this volume and also in another volume of the history of the Medical Department in World War II.1

The following 18 tables show statistical data on venereal diseases during the period 1941 through 1945 by geographic distribution and specific diagnosis. Diseases shown include gonorrhea, neurosyphilis, other syphilis, chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, and granuloma inguinale. The samples used to obtain tabulations of admission data, incidence data, or both were as follows: For 1942, 100 percent; for 1943, 20 percent in the United States and 100 percent in oversea areas; for 1944, 20 percent in Europe and 80 percent in other areas; and, for 1945, a 20 percent worldwide sample. Appendix table 9, which shows comparative rates of Negro troops versus non-Negro troops, varied from the cited sampling in that only 18 percent of individual medical records were used to obtain the 1944 statistics. Moreover, appendix table 8, which presents statistics on deaths due to venereal disease, was compiled from a review of all deaths recorded in the Army during the period.

Incidence (total cases) includes not only those cases in which the specified diagnosis was the primary cause of admission to medical treatment but also those cases for which the disease existed concurrently with another admission diagnosis or those cases which developed after admission to treatment. The data include cases contracted before Army service and, unless stated otherwise, CRO (carded for record only) cases; that is, patients treated on an outpatient basis without loss of time from duty. Tabulations of cases contracted before Army service were, however, available only for 1945; for this one year, 2 percent of the gonorrhea cases, 48 percent of the neurosyphilis cases, and 25 percent of the other syphilis cases were reported as having been contracted before Army service.

In appendix tables 4, 5, and 6, the loss to the Army in manpower as a result of venereal diseases is summarized. Average duration means the average time lost per admission, while rates for noneffectiveness reflect the average number of patients in hospitals or sick in quarters per 1,000 average strength. Admissions for venereal diseases and data on average duration, it is to be noted, are separately shown in appendix table 6 for 1945 to exclude and include CRO cases. Obviously, those cases carded for record only must be differentiated in that they do not contribute to the noneffectiveness shown in appendix tables 4 and 5.

Concerning the rate for noneffectiveness, it is worthy of note that in the years immediately preceding World War II venereal disease was one of the major causes of noneffectiveness at a daily rate of about 3.5 per 1,000 troops. This daily rate represented approximately one-half of the noneffectiveness caused by all infectious and parasitic diseases. By the last year of the war, the rate for noneffectiveness because of

1Medical Department, United States Army. Internal Medicine in World War II. Volume II. Infectious Diseases. [In preparation.]


471

venereal disease had dropped to about 1 per 1,000 troops, or approximately one-fifth of the noneffectiveness caused by all infectious and parasitic diseases.

Aforementioned appendix table 9 includes pooled data for both officers and enlisted men and reveals that venereal disease prevailed to an appreciably greater extent among Negro troops. Even though officers are confined mainly to the non-Negro category and show lower rates, according to the data for 1942 (the only year for which this type of data are available), the exclusion of officers would have had only a slight influence on the relative annual rates per one thousand average strength of the racial dichotomy. The rates per one thousand average strength for all venereal diseases, with and without officer cases, for 1942, follow:

Rate

Enlisted men only:

    

Negroes

261.64

    

Non-Negro personnel

27.43

    

Total

43.30

Officers and enlistd men:

    

Negroes

259.95

    

Non-Negro personnel

25.64

    

Total

40.36


Finally, the data presented in chapter X for the years 1942 through 1945 must be considered preliminary pending completion of final tabulations of individual medical records.


472

APPENDIX TABLE 1.-Incidence of venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis and area, 1941

[Rate expressed as number of cases per annum per 1,000 average strength]

Diagnosis

Total Army

United States1

Overseas2

Total overseas

Hawaii

Panama

Philippine Islands

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Gonorrhea

37,645

28.03

34,115

29.94

3,482

29.51

489

13.04

1,108

36.84

667

67.50

Neurosyphilis

262

.20

227

.20

32

.27

9

.24

15

.50

2

.20

Syphilis, other

8,239

6.13

7,181

6.30

1,021

8.65

96

2.56

208

6.92

189

19.13

Chancroid

4,679

3.48

2,902

2.55

1,774

15.03

37

.99

855

28.43

420

42.50

Lymphogranuloma venereum

768

.57

626

.55

142

1.20

2

.05

59

1.96

33

3.34

Granuloma inguinale

16

.01

16

.01

---

0

---

0

---

0

---

0

Diagnosis

Overseas2-Continued

Puerto Rico

Other areas

Transports

Native troops3

Filipinos

Puerto Ricans

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Gonorrhea

354

55.52

284

38.01

95

27.28

46

4.09

439

36.64

Neurosyphilis

1

.16

---

0

---

0

2

.18

3

.25

Syphilis, other

205

32.15

48

6.42

13

3.73

14

1.24

248

20.70

Lymphogranuloma venereum

14

2.20

8

1.07

1

.29

2

.18

23

1.92

Granuloma inguinale

---

0

---

0

---

0

---

0

---

0


1
Enlisted men only; includes Alaska.

2White enlisted men and native troops only.

3Native troops have not been distributed by geographic locations.

Source: Annual Report, Surgeon General of the Army, 1941.


473

APPENDIX TABLE 2.- Incidence (total cases) of venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis, broad geographic area, and year, 1942-45

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical records]
[Rate expressed as number of cases per annum per 1,000 average strength]

Diagnosis

1942-45

1942

1943

1944

1945

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES

Gonorrhea

464,962

31.52

83,540

31.44

123,920

23.91

130,652

32.87

126,670

43.21

Neurosyphilis

7,499

.51

825

.31

4,015

.77

1,744

.44

865

.30

Syphilis, other

222,906

15.12

18,284

6.88

87,895

16.96

77,827

19.60

38,900

13.27

Chancroid

21,085

1.43

6,465

2.43

8,190

1.58

3,680

.93

2,750

.94

Lymphagranuloma venereum

9,374

.64

1,730

.65

3,080

.59

2,624

.66

1,940

.66

Granuloma inguinale

623

.04

61

.02

100

.02

287

.07

175

.06

OVERSEAS

Gonorrhea

416,694

38.81

12,038

20.55

33,843

20.05

112,063

29.34

258,750

55.72

Neurosyphilis

2,290

.21

86

.15

296

.18

1,018

.27

890

.19

Syphilis, other

95,474

8.89

3,652

6.23

10,369

6.14

31,678

8.29

49,775

10.72

Chancroid

78,276

7.29

4,114

7.02

12,235

7.25

24,577

6.44

37,350

8.04

Lymphogranuloma venereum

5,625

.52

304

.52

749

.44

1,342

.35

3,230

.70

Granuloma inguinale

260

.02

4

.01

11

.01

75

.02

170

.04

TOTAL ARMY

Gonorrhea

881,386

34.59

95,578

29.47

157,763

22.96

242,625

31.14

385,420

50.88

Neurosyphilis

9,739

.38

911

.28

4,311

.63

2,762

.35

1,755

.23

Syphilis, other

318,380

12.50

21,936

6.76

98,264

14.30

109,505

14.06

88,675

11.71

Chancroid

99,361

3.90

10,579

3.26

20,425

2.97

28,257

3.63

40,100

5.29

Lymphogranuloma venereum

14,999

.59

2,034

.62

3,829

.56

3,966

.51

5,170

.68

Granuloma inguinale

883

.03

65

.02

111

.02

362

.05

345

.05

 

474-476

APPENDIX TABLE 3.- Incidence (total cases) of venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis, theater or area, and year, 1942-45

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical records]
[Rate expressed as number of cases per annum per 1,000 average strength]

Theater or area

1942-45

1942

1943

1944

1945

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

GONORRHEA

Continental United States

464,692

31.52

83,540

31.44

123,920

23.91

130,562

32.87

126,670

43.21

Overseas:

    

Europe

220,336

50.09

2,218

26.72

6,423

24.07

41,575

24.79

170,120

71.71

    

Mediterranean1

98,512

66.42

724

31.58

15,560

34.07

51,443

79.20

30,785

87.00

    

Middle East

3,981

27.23

224

37.05

1,287

24.26

1,370

29.64

1,100

26.90

    

China-Burma-India

9,087

20.72

317

36.25

985

24.86

3,295

19.53

4,490

20.28

    

Southwest Pacific

44,344

24.15

1,830

25.69

2,184

11.50

4,100

7.60

36,230

34.97

    

Central and South Pacific

13,658

10.87

1,120

7.42

1,247

4.28

2,571

5.86

8,720

23.21

    

North America2

3,614

7.34

706

7.02

1,053

5.41

1,145

8.86

710

10.43

    

Latin America

13,441

35.24

4,383

43.00

4,218

34.91

3,290

38.35

1,550

21.28

         

Total overseas3

416,694

38.81

12,038

20.55

33,843

20.05

112,063

29.34

258,750

55.72

         

Total Army

881,386

34.59

95,578

29.47

157,763

22.96

242,625

31.14

385,420

50.88

NEUROSYPHILIS

Continental United States

7,449

0.51

825

0.31

4,015

0.77

1,744

0.44

865

0.30

Overseas:

    

Europe

872

.20

9

.11

33

.12

405

.24

425

.18

    

Mediterranean1

263

.18

2

.09

50

.11

126

.19

85

.24

    

Middle East

56

.38

2

.33

24

.45

20

.43

10

.24

    

China-Burma-India

168

.38

----

----

7

.18

106

.63

55

.25

    

Southwest Pacific

371

.20

20

.28

59

.31

122

.23

170

.16

    

Central and South Pacific

309

.25

25

.17

54

.19

125

.28

105

.28

    

North America2

110

.22

9

.09

26

.13

55

.43

20

.29

    

Latin America

129

.34

18

.18

42

.35

49

.57

20

.27

         

Total overseas3

2,290

.21

86

.15

296

.18

1,018

.27

890

.19

         

Total Army

9,739

.38

911

.28

4,311

.63

2,762

.35

1,755

.23

SYPHILIS, OTHER

Continental United States

222,906

15.12

18,284

6,88

87,895

16.96

77,827

19.60

39,900

13.27

Overseas:

    

Europe

43,307

9.84

619

7.46

2,468

9.25

11,395

6.79

28,825

12.15

    

Mediterranean1

22,574

15.22

177

7.72

3,560

7.79

11,457

17.64

7,380

20.86

    

Middle East

1,971

13.48

61

10.09

731

13.78

789

17.07

390

9.54

    

China-Burma-India

5,828

13.29

65

7.43

576

14.54

2,697

15.99

2,490

11.25

    

Southwest Pacific

9,020

4.91

352

4.94

562

2.96

2,116

3.92

5,990

5.78

    

Central and South Pacific

4,572

3.64

361

2.39

388

1.33

1,568

3.57

2,255

6.00

    

North America2

989

2.01

151

1.50

271

1.39

297

2.30

270

3.97

    

Latin America

5,507

14.44

1,803

17.69

1,714

14.18

1,175

13.69

815

11.19

         

Total overseas3

95,474

8.89

3,652

6.23

10,369

6.14

31,678

8.29

49,775

10.72

         

Total Army

318,380

12.50

21,936

6.76

98,264

14.30

109,505

14.06

88,675

11.71

CHANCROID

Continental United States

21,084

1.43

6,465

2.43

8,190

1.58

3,680

0.93

2,750

0.94

Overseas:

    

Europe

17,062

3.88

133

1.60

584

2.19

2,760

1.65

13,580

5.72

    

Mediterranean1

32,991

22.25

299

13.04

8,076

17.68

18,616

28.66

6,000

16.96

    

Middle East

2,838

19.41

141

23.32

1,331

25.09

846

18.30

520

12.72

    

China-Burma-India

4,557

10.39

246

28.13

616

15.55

1,955

11.59

1,740

7.86

    

Southwest Pacific

13,190

7.18

71

1.00

78

.41

96

.18

12,945

12.49

    

Central and South Pacific

2,406

1.91

115

.76

36

.12

85

.19

2,170

5.78

    

North America2

84

.17

28

.28

33

.17

8

.06

15

.22

    

Latin America

4,650

12.19

3,007

29.50

1,358

11.24

155

1.81

130

1.78

         

Total overseas3

78,270

7.29

4,114

7.02

12,235

7.25

24,577

6.44

37,350

8.04

         

Total Army

99,361

3.90

10,579

3.26

20,425

2.97

28,257

3.63

40,100

5.29

LYMPHOGRANULOMA VENEREUM

Continental United States

9,374

0.64

1,730

0.65

3,080

0.69

2,624

0.66

1,940

0.66

Overseas:

    

Europe

1,333

.30

19

.23

84

.31

320

.19

910

.38

    

Mediterranean1

653

.44

5

.22

200

.44

318

.49

130

.37

    

Middle East

283

1.94

22

3.64

87

1.64

109

2.36

65

1.59

    

China-Burma-India

1,096

2.50

27

3.09

91

2.30

338

2.00

640

2.89

    

Southwest Pacific

1,071

.58

10

.14

10

.05

36

.07

1,015

.98

    

Central and South Pacific

415

.33

11

.07

29

.10

75

.17

300

.80

    

North America2

27

.05

2

.02

10

.05

10

.08

5

.07

    

Latin America

609

1.60

197

1.93

233

1.93

119

1.39

60

.82

         

Total overseas3

5,625

.52

304

.52

749

.44

1,342

.35

3,230

.70

         

Total Army

14,999

.59

2,034

.62

3,829

.56

3,966

.51

5,170

.68

GRANULOMA INGUINALE

Continental United States

623

0.04

61

.02

100

0.02

287

0.07

175

0.06

Overseas:

    

Europe

111

.03

1

.01

---

---

30

.02

80

.03

    

Mediterranean1

43

.03

---

---

1

.00

17

.03

25

.07

    

Middle East

1

.01

---

---

---

---

1

.02

---

---

    

China-Burma-India

34

.08

---

---

3

.08

6

.04

25

.11

    

Southwest Pacific

20

.01

---

---

1

.01

4

.01

15

.01

    

Central and South Pacific

42

.03

---

---

1

.00

16

.04

25

.07

    

North America2

3

.01

2

.02

1

.01

---

---

---

---

    

Latin America

5

.01

1

.01

3

.02

1

.01

---

---

         

Total overseas3

260

.02

4

.01

11

.01

75

.02

170

.04

         

Total Army

883

.03

65

.02

111

.02

362

.05

345

.05


1Includes North Africa.

2Includes Alaska and Iceland.

3Includes cases on transports.


477  

APPENDIX TABLE 4.- Noneffectiveness caused by venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis, 1942

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical records]

[Rate expressed as average number of noneffectives per 1,000 average strength]

Diagnosis

Total days lost1

Average duration2

Rate

Gonorrhea

842,738

22.4

1.72

Neurosyphilis

24,484

92.4

.05

Syphilis, other

184,718

22.4

.38

Chancroid

77,635

16.6

.16

Lymphogranuloma venereum

18,692

24.3

.04

Granuloma inguinale

434

27.1

.00


1Total days lost during the calendar year.
2Based on days lost and incidence (total cases) during the calendar year.

APPENDIX TABLE 5.-Noneffectiveness caused by venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis, 1942

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical records]

[Rate expressed as average number of noneffectives per 1,000 average strength]

Diagnosis

Total days lost1

Average duration2

Rate

Gonorrhea

1,859,910

19.5

1.48

Neurosyphilis

66,230

72.7

.04

Syphilis, other

453,840

20.7

.38

Chancroid

172,140

16.3

.14

Lymphogranuloma venereum

45,480

22.4

.04

Granuloma inguinale

2,500

38.5

.00


1Total days lost for all 1942 admissions.
2Average number of days lost per 1942 admission.


478

APPENDIX TABLE 6.-Average duration for venereal diseases, with and without cases carded for record only (no time lost) in the U.S. Army, 1945

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical records]

Admissions1 and average duration

Gonorrhea

Neurosyphilis

Syphilis, other

Chancroid

Lymphogranuloma venereum

Granuloma inguinale

United States:

    

Admissions:

        

Including CRO

122,780

705

32,385

2,340

1,800

130

         

Excluding CRO

31,135

695

24,380

2,280

1,765

130

    

Total days lost

237,335

89,425

412,805

36,025

41,980

6,970

    

Average duration (days):

    

Including CRO

1.9

126.8

12.7

15.4

23.3

53.6

    

Excluding CRO

7.6

128.7

16.9

15.8

23.8

53.6

Overseas:

    

Admissions:

         

Including CRO

271,115

665

42,205

35,005

2,685

120

         

Excluding CRO

120,500

660

41,995

33,670

2,665

120

    

Total days lost

723,185

85,494

781,490

417,230

62,420

7,330

    

Average duration (days):

         

Including CRO

2.7

128.6

18.5

11.9

23.2

61.1

         

Excluding CRO

6.0

129.5

18.6

12.4

23.4

61.1

Total Army:

    

Admissions:

         

Including CRO

393,895

1,370

74,590

37,345

4,485

250

         

Excluding CRO

151,635

1,355

66,375

35,950

4,430

250

    

Total days lost

960,520

174,920

1,194,295

453,255

104,400

14,300

    

Average duration (days):

         

Including CRO

2.4

127.7

16.0

12.1

23.3

57.2

         

Excluding CRO

6.3

129.1

18.0

12.6

23.6

57.2


1Admissions with known days lost.

APPENDIX TABLE 7.-Cases of venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis, 1944-45

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical record primary and secondary diagnoses]
[Rate expressed as number of cases per annum per 1,000 average strength]

Diagnosis

Total Army

United States

Overseas

1944

1945

1944

1945

1944

1945

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Gonorrhea

242,625

31.14

412,185

54.41

130,562

32.87

128,720

43.91

112,063

29.34

283,465

61.05

Neurosyphilis

2,762

.35

1,755

.23

1,744

.44

865

.30

1,018

.27

890

.19

Syphilis, other

109,504

14.06

86,775

11.46

77,826

19.59

37,605

12.83

31,678

8.29

49,170

10.59

Chancroid

28,250

3.63

40,835

5.39

3,679

.93

2,780

.95

24,571

6.43

38,055

8.20

Lymphogranuloma venereum

3,966

.51

5,345

.71

2,624

.66

2,030

.69

1,342

.35

3,315

.71

Granuloma inguinale

362

.05

355

.05

287

.07

185

.06

75

.02

170

.04


479

APPENDIX TABLE 8.-Deaths due to venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis and year, 1941-451

[Years 1942-45 based on preliminary tabulations of individual medical records]
[Rate expressed as number per annum per 1,000 average strength]

Year and area

Gonorrhea

Neurosyphilis

Syphilis, other

Chancroid

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

1941

United States2

5

0.44

4

0.35

11

0.97

---

0

Overseas3

---

0

---

0

---

0

---

0

    

Total

5

.37

4

.30

12

.89

---

0

1942

United States

6

.23

3

.11

10

.38

---

0

Overseas

---

0

1

.17

1

.17

---

0

    

Total

6

.19

4

.12

11

.34

---

0

1943

United States

14

.12

5

.10

14

.27

---

0

Overseas

2

.27

1

.06

2

.12

---

0

    

Total

16

.23

6

.09

16

.23

---

0

1944

United States

---

0

6

.15

7

.18

---

0

Overseas

2

.05

1

.03

3

.08

---

0

    

Total

2

.03

7

.09

10

.13

---

0

1945

United States

---

0

4

.14

3

.10

---

0

Overseas

---

0

3

.06

6

.13

1

.02

    

Total

---

0

7

.09

9

.12

1

.01


1No deaths due to granuloma inguinale or lymphogranuloma venereum during 1941-45.
2Enlisted men only; includes Alaska.
3White enlisted men and native troops only.

APPENDIX TABLE 9.-Incidence of venereal diseases in the U.S. Army, by diagnosis and race, 1942-44

[Preliminary data based on sample tabulations of individual medical records]
[Rate expressed as number of cases per annum per 1,000 average strength]

Diagnosis

Total Army

Non-Negro personnel

Negroes

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Number of cases

Rate

Gonorrhea

495,966

27.70

324,958

19.71

171,008

121.07

Neurosyphilis

7,984

.45

5,795

.35

2,189

1.55

Syphilis, other

229,705

12.83

96,046

5.82

133,659

94.63

Chancroid

59,261

3.31

28,632

1.74

30,629

21.69

Lymphogranuloma venereum

9,829

.55

1,826

.11

8,003

5.67

Granuloma inguinale

538

.03

59

.00

479

.34

Total

803,283

44.87

456,316

27.73

345,967

244.95

 

480

APPENDIX TABLE 10.-Incidence (total cases) of gonorrhea in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 1942


481-482

APPENDIX TABLE 11.-Incidence (total cases) of gonorrhea in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 1943


483

APPENDIX TABLE 12.-Admissions for gonorrhea in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 19441


484-485

APPENDIX TABLE 13.-Incidence (total cases) of syphilis (including neurosyphilis) in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 1942


486

APPENDIX TABLE 14.-Incidence (total cases) of syphilis (including neurosyphilis) in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 1943


487-488

APPENDIX TABLE 15.-Admissions for syphilis (including neurosyphilis) in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 19441


489

APPENDIX TABLE 16.-Incidence (total cases) of chancroid in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 1942


490-491

APPENDIX TABLE 17.-Incidence (total cases) of chancroid in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 1943


492

APPENDIX TABLE 18.-Admissions for chancroid in the U.S. Army, by theater or area and month, 19441

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