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Headquarters, 4th Medical Battlaion, APO #4, U.S. Army, 4 July 1944

Operation Overlord

HEADQUARTERS 4TH MEDICAL BATTALION*
APO #4, US  ARMY


4 July 1944

HISTORICAL NOTES: 1 May 1944 through 30 June 1944


    On May 1, 1944, the battalion was stationed at Tiverton, Devon, England in the process of preparation for movement to marshalling area. At this time the strength of the Battalion was 40 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, and 492 Enlisted Men. Preparations for movement to marshalling areas was completed on 17 May and the movement to the areas began. The collecting companies were attached in direct support of their Regimental Combat Teams and, therefore, the battalion was not bivouaced together.

    On May 27th, Bronze Star Ribbons were presented to five enlisted men of the battalion for their heroic deeds and meritorious services in the face of the enemy while participating in a training exercise (Tiger) on 28 April 1944. The ribbons and citations were presented by Brig. General Theodore Roosevelt at a ceremonial formation in a field on the outskirts of Totnes, Devon. Lt. Colonel Joseph H. Dwinelle, commanding the Battalion was in charge of the ceremony and read. the citations. These were the first awards presented to Enlisted Men of the Battalion and the 4th Infantry Division for achievements in contact with the enemy in World War II.  Men presented awards as follows: (GO #24, HQ, 4th Inf Div, dated 25 May 1944)

    Cpl. George Zett, Company “A”
    Pvt. Albert E. Judd, Company “C”
    Pvt. Aresto E. Fortino, Company “B”
    Pvt. Sol Schwartz, Company “B”
    T/5 Harry D. Evans, Company “C”    

    The strength of the Battalion as of 31st May 1944 and 1st June 1944 was 36 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, and 496 Enlisted Men.

    On June 1st and 2nd, the several companies of the Battalion, having been briefed on the coming operations, were loaded on invasion craft and ships for the movement

*SOURCE:  National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 407, The Adjutant General's Office, US Army, 4th Medical Battalion,
                     After-Action Reports, January-December 1944, Box 6727


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across the English Channel and the assault on the Cotentin Peninsula, France.  The Headquarters and Clearing units of the Battalion sailed aboard LSTs from Brixham. The collecting companies were broken down into small detachments and accompanied their respective Combat Teams. On “D” Day, 6 June 1944, the collecting companies landed, with their assault troops at “H” hour plus 3. Parts of the Headquarters and Clearing Company landed on “D” plus one and the remainder landed in the early pours of “D” plus two. By 1000 of 8 June 1944, the entire battalion was ashore and operating to full capacity. The clearing station first began to operate and evacuate casualties at 0630 8 June 1944 from its station at Hebert, Normandy, France (T-421939 GSGS 4250, 1-50000).

    On June 10th, the headquarters and clearing company moved up to support the advance of the division on Cherbourg and established in the vicinity of Bandienville, France (O-364986 GSGS 4250, 1-50000). The clearing station remained at this location until the Division had succeeded in reducing the German resistance at Montebourg, Valognes, and Quineville and on 21 June 1944 the two units were moved to a new location in the vicinity of Tamerville (O-249112, GSGS 4250, 1-50000). This position was found to be untenable due to the close proximity of enemy artillery fire and the location for headquarters and clearing company was displaced to the rear to a new location in the vicinity of St. Cyr (O-275064 GSGS 4250, 1-50000) on the Montebourg-Valognes Highway.

    June 27th saw the completion of the Cherbourg Campaign with the exception of scattered pockets of German Resistance. During the clearing up of these pockets of resistance, the Headquarters and Clearing Company remained at their location in the vicinity of St. Cyr and continued to receive casualties at a reduced rate.

    At the end of the month, the Battalion had evacuated a total of 6130 patients beginning on 8 June 1944. These casualties were not only from the 4th Infantry


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Division but also from 2 other divisions and their attached units. Casualties evacuated from the Division amounted to 4363. The Battalion also cleared 419 Prisoner of War casualties and 79 Civilians.

    Casualties suffered by the battalion itself from 6 June 1944 to 30 June 1944 inclusive are as follows:

    Company “A”
        Battle Casualties         8
        Exhaustion                  0
        Disease                      1
        Total                          9

    Company “B”
        Battle casualties         11
        Killed in action            2
        Died of Wounds         2
        Exhaustion                  4
        other disease              3
        Total                        22

    Company “C”
        Battle Casualties        5
        Died of Wounds        1
        Exhaustion                 5
        Other disease            1
        Total                       12

    Company “D”
        Disease            1 (officer)

    Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment - - - No casualties.

    Total casualties for the Battalion - - - 44

    The strength of the battalion at the close of the month was 37 officers, 1 Warrant officer, and 459 Enlisted Men.


                                                                                                            [signed]

                                                                                                            PAUL V. JONES, JR.,
                                                                                                            1st Lt. MAC
                                                                                                            Historical Officer