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Contents

Books and Documents

Neuropsychiatry in World War II

Volume I

Zone of Interior

Contents

FOREWORD

PREFACE

PROLOGUE

Part I

INTRODUCTION

Chapter

I.  Army Psychiatry Before World War II (Colonel Albert J. Glass, MC, USA (Ret.))
  Historical Note

  World War I

  Lessons of World War I
  Psychiatry, 1920-30
  Psychiatry, 1930-40
  Mobilization Period
  Mobilization of Civilian Psychiatry

Part II

ADMINISTRATIVE CONSIDERATIONS IN THE SURGEON GENERAL'S OFFICE

II.  Status and Development (Malcolm J. Farrell, M.D.)

  Early Organization
  Changing Concepts
  Neuropsychiatry Division
 

III.  Professional Personnel (Malcolm J. Farrell, M.D., and Ivan C. Berlien, M.D.)

  Distribution and Utilization of Psychiatrists

  Classification and Assignment

  Continued Shortages

  Psychiatric Workload Versus Psychiatric Manpower

  Conclusion

IV.  Education and Training (William C. Menninger, M.D.)

  Need for Training in Military Psychiatry
  The School of Military Neuropsychiatry

  Military Psychiatric Training in Civilian Schools
  What the Schools Accomplished

  Psychiatric Training in Oversea Theaters

  Training of Paramedical Psychiatric Personnel

  Psychiatric Education of General Medical Officers

  Orientation in Mental Health

  Training Films

V.  The Consultant System (William C. Menninger, M.D., Malcolm J. Farrell, M.D., and Henry W. Brosin, M.D.)

  The Need for Consultants

  Development in Zone of Interior

  The Assignment of Psychiatric Consultants

  General Functions of the Consultant

  Personnel Problems in the Service Command

  Problems of Newly Inducted Physicians

  Consultant Conferences

  Civilian Consultants

  Recommendations and Conclusions

VI.  Liaison With Other Agencies (Malcolm J. Farrell, M.D.)

  Scope

  Office of the Secretary of War
  Personnel Division, G-1

  Military Intelligence Division, G-2

  Training Division, G-3

  Headquarters, Army Service Forces
  Military Training Division, Army Service Forces

  Information and Education Division, Army Service Forces

  Headquarters, Army Ground Forces

  Headquarters, Army Air Forces

  Liaison With Other Divisions, Surgeon General's Office

  Miscellaneous, Technical, and Other Agencies

VII.  Public Relations (William C. Menninger, M.D.)

  Absence of Public Relations Planning
  Vacillating Policies and Publicity Blackout
  Publicity Blackout Continues
  Publicity Blackout Slackened Under Pressure
  Effort Toward Further Liberalization of Publicity Releases
  Restrictions Lifted as War Ends
  Conclusion

VIII.  Selection and Induction (Ivan C. Berlien, M.D., and Raymond W. Waggoner, M.D.)

  Historical Note

  1939-41 Philosophy of Selection

  Organization of Psychiatry During Mobilization

  Physical and Mental Standards

  Physical Profile Serial System

  Medical Survey Program

  Neuropsychiatric Screening Adjunct

  Effectiveness of the Neuropsychiatric Screening

Part III

MILITARY PSYCHIATRY IN PRACTICE

IX.  Hospitalization and Disposition (Norman Q. Brill, M.D.)

  Initial Problems

  Liberal Discharge Policy
  Reversal of Liberal Discharge Policy

  Liberal Discharge Policy Reestablished
  Final Policy
  Psychiatric Nomenclature

  Line-of-Duty Determination of Neuropsychiatric Disorders
  Special Problems
  Frequency of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

  World War II Mean Strengths

X.  Station and Regional Hospitals (Norman Q. Brill, M.D.)

  Organization and Functions

  Physical Facilities

  Personnel

  Clinical Problems

  Disposition

  Treatment

  Convalescent Hospitals

  Group Psychotherapy

  Final Policy

XI.  General Hospitals (Henry W. Brosin, M.D.)

  Historical Note

  Development of Physical Facilities

  Personnel

  Policies and Conflicts
  Functions and Operations
  Treatment
 

XII.  Troops in Transit (Morris M. Kessler, M.D.)

  Historical Note

  Ports of Embarkation

  Troopships en Route Overseas

  Transportation of Mental Patients to Zone of Interior

  Debarkation of Mental Patients

XIII.  The Mental Hygiene Consultation Services (Manfred S. Guttmacher, M.D.)

  Historical Note

  Origin and Development

  Expansion of Consultation Services

  Personnel

  Consolidation of Efforts

  Operation

  Location and Psychiatric Staff

  Conclusion

XIV.  Preventive Psychiatry (John W. Appel, M.D.)

  General Considerations

  Scope of Problem

  Need for Preventive Psychiatry

  Epidemiology of Military Psychiatric Disorders

  Application in Zone of Interior

  Preventive Psychiatry in Combat Theaters

  Army Authorities and Psychiatry

  Summary

XV.  The Women's Army Corps (Margaret D. Craighill, M.D.)

  Development

  Relationship to Medical Services

  Procurement

  Enlistment Physical Examination Procedures
  Mental Hygiene Consultation Services

  Health Education

  Utilization of WAC Personnel

  Oversea Assignment

  The Psychiatric Problem

  Specific Problems of Female Military Personnel

  Termination Problems

  Summary and Conclusions

XVI.  Forensic Military Psychiatry (Lieutenant Colonel Robert J. Bernucci, MC, USA (Ret.)

  Historical Note

  Military Jurisdiction
  Psychiatric Evaluation of the Accused
  Psychiatric Responsibilities in Administrative Procedures
  Critique

XVII.  Psychiatry in the Army Correctional System (Ivan C. Berlien, M.D.
  General Considerations
  Organizational Background

  Psychiatric Services
  Restoration to Duty

  Mental Responsibility

  Changes in the Rehabilitation Process
  Training of Correctional Personnel

  Group Therapy

  Psychiatry and Clemency

  Hospitalization for Psychotic Prisoners

  Statistical Data

XVIII.  Neurology (William H. Everts, M.D.)

  Coordination of Neurology Activities
  Disqualification for Neurological Reasons
  Organization in Zone of Interior
  Organization Overseas
  Admission and Disposition
  Common Clinical Disorders

  Neurological Disorders in Allied Repatriates and Japanese Prisoners of War

  Summary

Part IV

SUPPORTING SERVICES AND PERSONNEL

XIX.  Clinical Psychology (Morton A. Seidenfeld, Ph. D.)

  Historical Note
  Development of Clinical Psychology Program in World War II
  Procurement

  Professional Training
  Relationships With The Adjutant General and The Surgeon General
  Functions and Duties
  Mental and Educational Deficiency
  Psychological Tests
  Summary

XX.  Psychiatric Social Work (Daniel E. O'Keefe, Ph. D.)

  Historical Note

  Early Efforts
  Extension of Psychiatric Social Work
  Specification Serial Number 263 Established

  Training

  Standards of Practice
  Convalescent Hospitals

  General and Special Hospitals
  Miscellaneous Activities
  Psychiatric Social Work Branch, Surgeon General's Office

  Officer Psychiatric Social Workers

  Statistics 

  Summary and Recommendations

XXI.  The Neuropsychiatric Nurse (Lieutenant Colonel Charlotte R. Rodeman, ANC, USA (Ret.))

  General Considerations

  Inservice Training

  Oversea Theaters

  Neuropsychiatric Nursing on Hospital Ships
  Neuropsychiatric Nursing in the Army Air Forces

  Conclusion

XXII.  Occupational Therapy in Neuropsychiatry (Major Wilma L. West, AMSC, USAR)

  Early Problems

  Problems in Program Development

  Development of Specific Programs

  In Retrospect

XXIII.  Reconditioning of Psychiatric Patients (Colonel Edward F. Quinn, Jr., MSC, USA (Ret.))

  Background

  Evolution of Reconditioning

  Principles and Aims

  Organization and Operation

  Conclusion

XXIV.  The Chaplain (Harold E. Berger, B.D.)
  Historical Note

  Uniqueness of Role

  Functions

  Need for Psychiatric Indoctrination

XXV.  The Technicians (Lieutenant Colonel Charlotte R. Rodeman, ANC, USA (Ret.), Morton A. Seidenfeld, Ph. D. and Myron J. Rockmore, M.A.)

Section I. The Neuropsychiatric Technician

  Development and Difficulties

  Zone of Interior

  Oversea Theaters

  Summary

Section II. Psychology Technicians

  Selection

  Training

  Summary

Section III. Psychiatic Social Work Technician

  Need for Technicians

  Qualifications
  Training

  Assignment

Part V

THE POSTWAR PERIOD

XXVI.  Problems of Adjustment in Return to Civilian Life (Norman Q. Brill, M.D., and Herbert I. Kupper, M.D.)

  The Soil for Potential Problems

  Divergent Views on Potential Problems

  Analysis and Methods of Attacking the Problems

  The Veteran Goes to School

  Error in Crime Prediction

  Social and Economic Help

XXVII.  The Psychiatric Patient After Discharge(Norman Q. Brill, M.D., and Herbert I. Kupper, M.D.)

  Misconceptions About Psychoneurosis

  Postdischarge Adjustment During the War

  Residuals of Wartime Psychiatric Illness

  Postdischarge Psychiatric Illness

XXVIII.  Lessons Learned (Colonel Albert J. Glass, MC, USA (Ret.))

  Magnitude of Psychiatric Disorders in Modern Warfare

  Organization of Psychiatry for War

  Psychiatric Screening

  Gain in Illness

  Consultation Services

  Diagnosis and Disposition

  The Making of Wartime Military Psychiatrists

  Summary

APPENDIXES

A.  Disqualifications and Discharges for Neuropsychiatric Reasons, World War I and World War II (Bernard D. Karpinos, Ph. D., and Col. Albert J. Glass, MC, USA (Ret.))

  Disqualifications for Neuropsychiatric Reasons: World Wars I and II

  Discharges for Neuropsychiatric Reasons: World Wars I and II

  General Comment

B.  Mobilization Regulations Pertaining to Mental and Nervous Diseases and Neurological Disorder

C.  Meeting of Neuropsychiatric Consultants, Office of The Surgeon General

D.  Report of the Special Committee to the Secretary of War on Induction

E.  Neuropsychiatric Problem in the Army

F.  Calendar of Significant Events

Illustrations

Figure

1.  Lt. Col. Malcolm J. Farrell, MC, Deputy Director, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 10 April 1942-15 June 1945

2.  Col. Roy D. Halloran, MC, Director, Neuropsychiatry Division, Surgeon General's Office, 17 August 1942-10 November 1943

3.  Lt. Col. Walter E. Barton, MC, Chief, Occupational Therapy Branch, Neuropsychiatry Division, Surgeon General's Office, 22 April 1943-3 February 1944

4.  Lt. Col. William H. Everts, MC, Chief, Neurology Branch, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 12 September 19431- 1 July 1945

5.  Brig. Gen. William C. Menninger, Director, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 10 December 1943-30 June 1946

6.  Lt. Col. Norman Q. Brill, MC, Chief, Psychiatry Branch, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 13 March 1944-8 October 1945

7.  Maj. David W. Hilger, MC, Assistant Chief, Mental Hygiene Branch, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 29 April 1944-9 June 1945

8.  Lt. Col. Manfred S. Guttmacher, MC, Chief, Consultation Services, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 15 September 1944-30 July 1945

9.  Maj. Alexander T. Ross, MC, Chief, Neurology Branch, Neuropsychiatry Consultants Division, Surgeon General's Office, 2 July-20 December 1945

10. Col. Lloyd J. Thompson, MC, Senior Consultant in Neuropsychiatry, Office of the Chief Surgeon, European Theater of Operations, U.S. Army

11. Col. Ernest H. Parsons, MC, Commanding Officer, 312th Station Hospital (NP), European Theater of Operations, U.S. Army
12. Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Jackson M. Thomas, MC, Director, School of Military Neuropsychiatry, European Theater of Operations, U.S. Army

13. Lt. Col. (later Col.) M. Ralph Kaufman, MC, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, South Pacific Base Command

14. Lt. Col. (later Col.) Edward G. Billings, MC, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, South Pacific Area

15. Lt. Col. Paul L. Schroeder, MC, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, Fourth Service Command

16. Col. Lauren H. Smith, MC, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, Ninth Service Command

17. Col. S. Alan Challman, MC, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, Southwest Pacific Area

18. Lt. Col. Joseph S. Skobba, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, Fourth and Fifteenth U.S. Armies

19. Lt. Col. Calvin S. Drayer, MC, Neuropsychiatric Consultant, Fifth U.S. Army

20. Staff of the Neuropsychiatry Division, Surgeon General's Office, and service command consultants, meeting of 22 October 1943

21. Service Command Neuropsychiatric Consultants Meeting, Surgeon General's Office, 12-13 May 1944

22. Service Command Consultants Conference (Neuropsychiatry), Surgeon General's Office, 20-21 April 1945

23. Neuropsychiatric Consultants to the Secretary of War

24. Conference in the Surgeon General's Office, after V-E Day, on development of medical facilities in the Pacific

25. Meeting of American, Canadian, and British psychiatrists in Montreal, Canada, 16 November 1943

26. British and American medical officers, on a tour of inspection of all surrounding hospitals near Atlanta, Ga., attend a general conference in Atlanta, 10 November 1943

27. A neuropsychiatric attendant bringing a tray of food to a mental patient in a paranoid state

28. A disturbed patient in a seclusion room

29. Floor plan of a typical neuropsychiatric ward

30. Standard open psychiatric ward identical with ward used for medical, surgical, and other nonpsychiatric patients

31. Neuropsychiatric Section, Water Reed General Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1934

32. Neuropsychiatric Section, Brooke General Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Tex.

33. Poster announcement of an occupational therapy exhibit aboard the U.S. Army Hospital Ship Emily H. M. Weder

34. The commanding officer inspecting one of the exhibits on the U.S. Army Hospital Ship Emily H. M. Weder

35. Nurses admiring what their patients had accomplished aboard ship

36. Interested visitors at the Arts and Crafts Exhibit on the U.S. Army Hospital Ship Emily H. M. Weder

37. Articles made of leather in the Arts and Crafts Exhibit

38. A ward on the U.S. Army Hospital Ship Emily H. M. Weder

39. The U.S. Army Hospital Ship Larkspur, arriving at Charleston, S.C., 1944

40. Army Ground Forces Retraining Center psychiatrists' meeting, North Camp Hood, Tex., March 1944

41. A patient with camptocormia reporting to the neuropsychiatric clinic

42. Lt. Col. Margaret D. Craighill, MC

43. Lt. Col. Margaret D. Craighill, MC (left), and Col. Oveta Culp Hobby, Director, WAC (right)

44. Conference, WAC Staff Directors, Major Commands, Fort Des Moines, Iowa, 18 September 1945

45. Cartoon, "Grin and Bear It"

46. A psychiatric social work officer giving an orientation lecture, U.S. Disciplinary Barracks

47. The prison neuropsychiatrist and his assistant discuss one of the patients confined and under treatment at a U.S. disciplinary barracks

48. A neuropsychiatric social work technician conducts a group therapy session, with U.S. disciplinary barracks prisoners

49. A disciplinary and adjustment board meeting at a U.S. disciplinary barracks

50. Typical appearance of Japanese prisoner-of-war patients, New Bilibid Prison, 1945

51. Japanese nurse with dependent children having typical appearance of malnutrition, New Bilibid Prison, September-October 1945

52. T3g Ellen Sellers, WAC psychiatric social worker, interviewing a neuropsychiatric patient at Brooke General Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Tex.

53 Maj. Charlotte R. Rodeman, ANC, Technical Director of Neuropsychiatric Nursing, Medical Field Service School, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Tex., goes over a training chart with Lt. Doris Rasco, ANC

54. Maj. Juanita Costa and Capt. Ann Hogan demonstrate the application of a restraining pack used for neuropsychiatric patients

55. The U.S. Army Hospital Ship Frances Y. Slanger, New York Port of Embarkation, Brooklyn, N.Y., 1945

56. Floor plan, occupational therapy facilities

57. Miniature model building in occupational therapy

58. Training chart showing materials and equipment used in the wetpack

59. Neuropsychiatric technicians preparing the bed for a patient to receive a wetpack

60. Neuropsychiatric technicians wrapping a patient in the wetpack

61. Neuropsychiatric technicians securing the last blanket of a wet sheet pack

62. Neuropsychiatric technician assisting nurse with a patient in a "continuous tub"

63. Neuropsychiatric technician, watching the "continuous tub" patient, prevents dehydration by forcing liquids
64. Neuropsychiatric technician demonstrates one of the hazards of the neuropsychiatric ward

65. Intake interview by a psychiatric social worker assistant

Charts

Number

1.  Discharge rates of enlisted men on certificate of disability for discharge for neuropsychiatric conditions, U.S. Army, by year and month, 1942-45.

2.  Admission rates for neuropsychiatric disorders, U.S. Army, by year and month, 1942-45

3.  Neuropsychiatric patients remaining in hospital: total and by open and closed wards, continental United States, 1943-45

4.  Number of neuropsychiatric patients remaining in hospitals, 1943-45 (as of end of month)

5.  Admission rates for neuropsychiatric disorders, U.S. Army, worldwide, continental United States, and oversea theaters, by month, 1942-45

6. Admission rates for neurospychiatric disorders, U.S. Army, worldwide, continental United States, and oversea theaters, by diagnosis, 1942-45

7. Admission rates for neuropsychiatric disorders, for selected areas, U.S. Army, 1944

8. Relation between trend of battle injury, and neuropsychiatric admissions, selected divisions, Fifth U.S. Army

9. Admissions for battle injuries and neuropsychiatric conditions, World War I and World War II (1944), by theaters of operations

10. Rejection rates of WAAC and WAC candidates, by month and race, November 1942 through December 1944

11. Leading causes of rejection among WAAC and WAC candidates for medical reasons, November 1942 through December 1944, by quarters

12. Medical rejection rates of WAAC and WAC candidates, by diagnosis

13. Admission rates for total Army and for Wacs, for all causes and for neuropsychiatric disorders, June 1944 through December 1945

14. Admissions for all Army personnel and for the WAC, in the United States, June 1944-December 1945

15. Admission rates for psychiatric conditions, by broad diagnostic categories and year, 1917-59

16. Disability discharge rates for psychiatric conditions, by broad diagnostic categories and year, 1917-59

Tables

1.  Disqualification and discharge rates for neuropsychiatric reasons, at selected induction stations, 1943
2.  Disability discharges for neuropsychiatric conditions, by diagnosis and year, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45

3.  Discharge rates of enlisted men on certificates of disability for discharge for neuropsychiatric conditions, by broad diagnostic categories and month, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45
4.  Relationship between discharges for disability for neuropsychiatric conditions and disability for all nonbattle diseases and injuries, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45

5. Neuropsychiatric patients evacuated from overseas, by month, 1943-45

6. Admissions for neuropsychiatric conditions, by diagnosis and year, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45
7. Admissions for neuropsychiatric disorders, by broad diagnostic categories, month, and year, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45
8. Admission rates for neuropsychiatric disorders, by broad diagnostic categories, month, and year, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45
9. Percent distribution of admissions for neuropsychiatric disorders and psychiatric disorders, by diagnosis, U.S. Army, 1942-45
10. Neuropyschiatric patients remaining in hospital: number and percent of all remaining hospital patients, by year, month, and percent distribution by closed and open wards, U.S. Army, continental United States, 1943-45

11.  Administrative separations of enlisted men for inaptitude or unsuitability, unfitness, reasons other than honorable (excluding unfitness), and dishonorable discharges, and total specified administrative separations, numbers, and rates, by year, 1942-45

12.  Administrative separations for inaptitude or unsuitability, unfitness, reasons other than honorable (excluding unfitness), and dishonorable discharges, by year and month, 1942-45

13.  Mean Army strengths, total Army and enlisted men, by year, 1942-45

14.  Admissions for neuropsychiatric conditions, by diagnosis and year, U.S. Army,  continental United States, 1942-45

15.  Percent distribution of admissions for neuropsychiatric conditions, by diagnosis  and year, U.S. Army, continental United States, 1942-45

16.  Admission rates for psychiatric conditions, by rank, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45

17.  Disposition of neuropsychiatric cases from convalescent hospitals, 11 May-29 June 1945

18.  Referrals to consultation service, by category, ASF Training Center (Ordnance), 1 June 1943-31 December 1944

19. Referrals to consultation service, by category, AGF Replacement Training Center (Infantry), 1 June 1943-30 November 1944

20. Consultation service of mental hygiene clinics, Army Service Forces and Army Ground Forces, January-June 1945

21. Disposition of cases, consultation service, ASF Training Center (Ordnance), 1 June 1943-31 December 1944

22. Admissions for neuropsychiatric conditions, by diagnosis and year, U.S. Army, overseas, 1942-45

23. Admissions for neuropsychiatric disorders, U.S. Army, worldwide, continental United States, and oversea theaters, by month, 1942-45

24. Percent distribution of admissions for neuropsychiatric conditions, by diagnosis and year, U.S. Army, overseas, 1942-45

25. Admission rates for neuropsychiatric disorders, U.S. Army, worldwide, continental United States, and oversea theaters, by diagnosis, 1942-45

26. Percent distribution of disability discharges for neuropsychiatric disorders, by diagnosis, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45

27. Distribution of personnel discharged for neuropsychiatric conditions and for all medical conditions, by percent with oversea service

28. Admissions for battle injuries and neuropsychiatric conditions, World War I and World War II (1944), by theater of operations

29. Indexes of morbidity, by length of foreign service

30. Accessions of personnel in the Women's Army Corps (WAAC and WAC), 1942-45

31. Distribution of Waacs discharged from the service, by length of service and selected causes of disability discharge, May 1943

32. Results of the medical examination of enlisted WAAC and WAC candidates, by race, November 1942 through December 1944

33. Results of the medical examination of enlisted WAAC and WAC candidates, by month and race, November 1942 through December 1944

34. Medical rejection rates of WAAC and WAC candidates, by diagnosis, November 1942 through December 1944

35. Medical rejection rates of Waacs, by service command and diagnosis, April through July 1943

36. Rejections of white WAC candidates, by specific diagnosis, October 1943 through March 1944

37. Rejection rates of white WAC candidates, for neuropsychiatric conditions, by age, October 1943 through March 1944

38. Rejection rates of white WAC candidates, for psychiatric conditions, by marital status and broad age intervals, October 1943 through March 1944

39. Medical rejection rates of Wacs, by service command and diagnosis, October through December 1943 

40. Percent distribution of Waacs discharged from the service, by diagnosis, August l942through May 1943

41. Percent distribution of white WAC separations, by length of service and age, October 1943 through October 1944

42. Percent distribution of white WAC separations, by cause and length of service, October 1943 through October 1944

43. Percent distribution of white WAC separations, by diagnosis, October 1943 through October 1944

44. Separations for disability of white Wacs, by age and length of service, October 1943 through October 1944

45. Separations for disability of white Wacs, by marital status and length of service, October 1943 through October 1944

46. Enlisted women (Waacs and Wacs) separated from the service, by cause of separation, August 1942 through December 1946

47. Discharges for disability and pregnancy of Waacs and Wacs, by year, 1942-46

48. Admission rates for total Army and for Wacs for all causes and for neuropsychiatric disorders, June 1944 through December 1945

49. Distribution of the general prisoners in confinement at rehabilitation centers, disciplinary barracks, and Federal institutions, by neuropsychiatric diagnosis, 1945

50. Distribution of 19,662 of 24,289 general prisoners, by place of confinement and principal military offense, 1945

51. Distribution of 23,242 of 24,327 general prisoners, by place of confinement and educational attainment (grade completed), 1945

52. Comparative percent distributions of the general prisoners and of enlisted men in the Army, by educational attainment (grades completed), 1944-45

53. Comparative distributions of the general prisoners and of enlisted men in the Army by their scores on the Army General Classification Test, 1945 

54. Comparative distributions of the general prisoners and the mean strength of Army enlisted men, by age, 1944

55. Distribution of the 21,867 of 24,327 general prisoners, by place of confinement and number of commitments, 1945

56. Distribution of 21,376 of 24,327 general prisoners, by place of confinement and number of previous courts-martial, 1945

57. Distribution of 19,461 of 24,327 general prisoners, by place of confinement and general courts-martial, 1945

58. Distribution of the general prisoners, by place of confinement and crimes committed, 1945

59. Distribution of 21,039 of 24,327 general prisoners, by place of confinement and number of arrests in civilian life, 1945

60. Admissions for neurological conditions, by diagnosis and year, U.S. Army, worldwide, 1942-45

61. Separations for neurological conditions, U.S. Army, by diagnosis and year, worldwide, 1942-45

62. Percent distribution of separations for neurological conditions, U.S. Army, worldwide, by diagnosis, 1942-45

63. Followup study of 520 patients admitted in 1943 for herniated nucleus pulposus and their military status as of February 1945

64. Military effectiveness of special training unit graduates and the control group

65. Occupational Therapy Program at Mason General Hospital, 1944-45

66. Admission rates for psychiatric conditions, by broad diagnostic categories and year, 1917-59

67. Disability discharge rates for psychiatric conditions, by broad diagnostic categories and year, 1917-59