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Headquarters, 67th Evacuation Hospital (SEM), APO 230

Books and Documents > 67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL (SEMI-MOBILE)

HEADQUARTERS

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL (SEM)

APO 230, U. S. ARMY

15 March 1945

SUBJECT: Transmittal of Annual Report.

TO : The Surgeon General, U. S. Army, Washington 25, D.C. (THRU: Surgeon, First United States Army, Main Echelon).

1. Transmitted herewith Annual Report of 67th Evacuation Hospital (Sem) for year 1944.

2. Delay in submission of report due to recent movements of this command.

For the Commanding Officer:

[signed]

JAMES C. WOOLLEY

1st Lt. MAC

Adjutant


ANNUAL REPORT

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944


iii

Table of Contents

Map v

Calendar of Western European Operations vii

Annual Report

Report of Personnel

Appendixes

A - Report of Operative Section

B - Report of Medical Section

C - Activities of X-Ray Department

D - Activities of Laboratory Department

E - Report of Registrar and Receiving Sections

F - Report of EENT and Dental Clinics

G - Chaplain's Report

H - Report of Mess Section

I - Report of Quartermaster Laundry

J - Activities of Nurse Personnel

K - Report of Supply Section


Map of 67th Evacuation Hospital Locations (1)

Map of 67th Evacuation Hospital Locations (2)

Map of 67th Evacuation Hospital Locations (3)


vii

CALENDAR OF WESTERN EUROPEAN OPERATIONS

1944

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

(Arrival of Unit in ETO: Scotland, 29 Nov 1943; site in England, 30 Nov 1943)

Days Open

Days Closed

Days With Patients

Days with No Patients

Training in England

1 Jan

Departure for Continent

16 June

Arrival of Unit in France

17 June

1

1

Bivouac: Boutteville

18 June

1

1

Operation I: Near Ste Mère Église

29

29

a. Opened

19 June

b. Closed (Last Treatment: 17 Jul)

17 July

Bivouac: Ste Mère Église

18-23 July

6

6

Lison

7

7

Movement

31 July

1

1

Operation II: Near St. Lô (Berigny)

9

5

14

a. Opened

1 Aug

b. Closed (Last Treatment: 14 Aug)

9 Aug

Movement

15 Aug

1

1

Operation III: Near Gorron

4

8

12

a. Opened

16 Aug

b. Closed (Last Treatment: 27 Aug)

20 Aug

Bivouac: Near Gorron

28-29 Aug

2

2

Movement

30 Aug

1

1

Operation IV: Near Pierre Levée

8

4

12

a. Opened

31 Aug

b. Closed (Last Treatment: 11 Sept)

7 Sept

Bivouac: Near Pierre Levée

12-21 Sept

10

10

Movement

22-24 Sept

3

3

Operation V: Lentzweiler, Luxembourg

11

11

a. Opened

25 Sept

b. Closed (Last Treatment: 5 Oct)

5 Oct

Bivouac: Stavelot, Belgium

6-31 Oct

25

25

Operation VI: Malmédy, Belgium

48

49

a. Opened

31 Oct

b. Closed (Last Patient Cleared: 18 Dec)

19 Dec

Tactical Withdrawal

a. Spa, Belgium

17 Dec

b. Harzé, Belgium

18 Dec

c. Huy, Belgium

19-22 Dec

4

4

Bivouac: Namur, Belgium

23-31 Dec

9

9

Totals

109

89

127

71

Number of Days on Continent 198
Number of Days Open 109 -- 55.05%
Number of Days Closed 89 -- 44.95%
Number of Days Hospitalizing Patients 127 -- 64.16%
Number of Days With No Patients 71 -- 35.84%


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[ANNUAL REPORT]

The year 1944 will not be soon forgotten by the officers, nurses, and enlisted men of the 67th Evacuation Hospital, Semimobile. Mouths of preparation and training in The United States and England were more than amply rewarded by the satisfaction of participating, both as members of a Medical Department unit and as individual soldiers of the American Army, in the campaigns of Western Europe during this momentous year.

After landing in Normandy on D-day plus 11, the 67th Evacuation Hospital fulfilled its mission of aiding combat troop-in a creditable manner, it is believed-by rendering medical service to more than 11,000 Allied battle and non-battle casualties, not to mention over 1,000 prisoners of war, during the Cherbourg push, the Saint Lô breakthrough, and the race across liberated France. The last three months of the year were spent in the very regions of Luxembourg and Belgium which later became the scenes of the unfortunate drama of the last two weeks of December. Forced to abandon operation in a town on the vital northern shoulder of the "bulge" forged by Von Rundstedt's armies, the hospital withdrew on the 17th of December to a city well to the rear. No losses were suffered in that action; however, the chagrin which resulted from the retrograde movement brought the year to a sober close.


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The first five months of 1944, recollected with difficulty after the exciting events which followed them, passed slowly in England, where the unit had arrived on the last day of November of the previous year. Its assignment to the First United States Army dates from the day of arrival in the European Theater of Operations.

Intensive training was the order of the day, for signs of the nearness of the enemy were not lacking in England. The town in which the hospital was located, however, experienced only three air-raid "alerts" and no bombs fell nearer than five miles away. Valuable as every hour of preparation turned out to be, training schedules, field problems, hikes, classes, and "dry runs", followed by more "dry runs"- so near and yet so far from the fields of actual batt1e-alternately brought spells of "invasion fever" and a sense of frustration. This state of affairs continued into June.

The pre-invasion months of blacked-out nights and many sunless days in a small Gloucestershire town produced only a few events worth recording. During the last two weeks of January, the hospital was set up in its entirety in tents in a scrubby pasture on a bleak hillside. There the unit received its baptism of European mud.

In March a more successful field exercise was carried out when the complete hospital with all its equipment was set up for a week on the level lawns adjacent to historic Berkeley Castle.


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Here for the first time were tried out the arrangements of tents and equipment which later became standardized as the unit standing operating procedure, although such another grassy expanse was not found among the hedgerows of Normandy or the hilly farmlands and woods of Luxembourg and Belgium. Brigadier General John A. Rogers (then Colonel), First US Army Surgeon, inspected the installation with Colonel Edward S. Murphy, Medical Inspector of his staff, and pronounced the unit ready for its probable mission in future operations.

Early in April, mainly for physical "conditioning" of personnel, the hospital was again set up in a picturesque site on a high plateau looking out over typical Cotswold valleys. Road marches and other field exercises were carried out.

Recreational and morale activities were important aspects of the stay in England. Fortunately the town possessed a large hall where dances for both commissioned and enlisted personnel could be held and Special Service movies shown. Three USO shows played to crowded and enthusiastic houses. International goodwill was fostered, perhaps not negligibly, by the custom of inviting to these dances groups of members of the RAF and WAAF from nearby airfields. A softball league among the hospitals of the region, mainly First US Army evacuation hospitals, natural rivals, proved diverting to both soldiers and citizenry. The local secondary school generously loaned its playing fields for ceremonies so that formal retreat was held daily after April.


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The entire unit participated with other local American troops in the "Salute the Soldier Week" parade and ceremonies in May.

Nor was the spiritual welfare of the hospital neglected. Protestant members worshipped with a local congregation which lacked a pastor, the unit chaplain preaching in his place on Sunday mornings, an arrangement which proved very satisfactory. Catholic personnel attended the local church, while those of Jewish faith went to services at a nearby station hospital.

Otherwise the months before June followed familiar Army patterns. Each section of the hospital studied and experimented with-and then selected and perfected-methods and procedures for operating under combat conditions as far as they could be known or foreseen. Occupied with obtaining, distributing, and maintaining the hundreds of items in the tables of unit and personal equipment, the Supply Section seemed at times the busiest section. Almost every medical officer, 11 nurses, and 26 enlisted men attended special Army and civilian schools for courses in war surgery and medicine as well as in general military subjects.

In April a detachment of one officer and thirty-three enlisted men of the Quartermaster Laundry Company was permanently attached to the hospital, becoming a very valuable, indeed, almost indispensable, part of the hospital. Two members of the American Red Cross, an assistant field director and a recreational assistant, were attached also in the same month.


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In April, too, a course in waterproofing was attended by the unit motor transportation officer and three enlisted men, who later instructed other drivers and mechanics. About May 1, the mess officer received word that for a movement to the Continent "K" rations for three days for hospital personnel and "B" rations for two days, excluding perishable items, for patients would be carried. Early In June the unit was brought to full strength in personnel. Unit equipment which was not to be taken on organizational vehicles was transported to a Welsh port and loaded on cargo ships. Everybody was ready "to go places."

D-day arrived, however, with the 67th Evacuation Hospital, Semimobile, still in Gloucestershire, waiting impatiently for the secret order which finally came on the evening of June 14: The unit was to leave for France in the morning! Last-minute loading of vehicles with personal luggage and "housekeeping equipment" was accomplished with enthusiastic dispatch.

On the following morning six officers and fifty-one enlisted men departed in motor convoy from the home station at six o'clock, arriving five hours later at Marshalling Area "D" near a Channel port. Final waterproofing was immediately started.

All other personnel departed by rail at 0945 hours and reached their destination about four hours later. During the afternoon and evening personnel were "processed" and received the usual instructions. Pounds and shillings were exchanged for


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francs, série de 1944. A detachment of three officers and thirteen enlisted men left with eight vehicles for LST 1109 just before midnight.

The morning of June 16 saw the main detachment of hospital personnel being loaded onto LCIs 1423 and 1424 in groups of 201 (31 officers, 40 nurses, and 130 enlisted men) and 75 (1 officer and 74 enlisted men). About three o'clock in the afternoon these commodious vessels got underway. The crossing was slow because the LCIs were serving as escorts for a number of lumbering LCTs. Three officers and thirty-eight enlisted men loaded the remaining vehicles on LST 1110 later that night.

The crossing of the Channel and the landing of the four detachments into which the 67th Evacuation Hospital had been divided proved entirely uneventful. None of the groups encountered any known enemy action, and the sands of "Utah Beach" were gained without even a wet foot. One LCI was almost run down by a Liberty Ship during the night. Motion-sickness pills may have contributed to the minimum of obvious seasickness.

The two main groups of personnel disembarked at 1400 hours, June 17, and proceeded on foot to a temporary transit area a quarter of a mile back from the beach, remaining there for a few hours. Officers and nurses then went to the 91st Evacuation Hospital, several of them going to work soon after arrival. Enlisted men bivouaced in a separate area.


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During the morning of the 18th, the detachment with the unit vehicles landed from their LSTs and reached the temporary location of the unit. The first truckload of supplies reached the unit supply office in the early afternoon. On receipt of instructions to open the hospital on the following day, enlisted personnel went to prepare the site and to set up the hospital.

The move to the first site having been completed, the 67th Evacuation Hospital officially opened at 1200 hours in the vicinity of La Fiere, about four miles west of Sainte Mère Église. The front lines were about 7 or 8 miles away on the north, 6 miles on the west, and 3 to 4 miles on the southwest. The first of the 4,684 patients admitted during twenty-eight and a half days of operation, Pvt John Micheal, was admitted at three o' clock in the afternoon. Two of the first ten patients were enemy prisoners of war.

The hospital had for its use two large fields bounded by typical Normandy hedgerows. The hospital occupied the larger field, with the pup tents and foxholes of the enlisted men spread along the edges. Tents for officers and nurses were placed in the other and smaller field to the rear, which sloped toward the rearward front line west of Carentan. Adjoining fields were later employed by two attached hospitals. The motor pool had a separate field a few yards away. All fields were nearly level and covered with grass. All in all, the site proved very satisfactory, and it was


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approached by a fine network of roads.

On the second day of operation the first of many surgical teams of specialists from the 3rd and other Auxiliary Groups and General Hospitals arrived for duty. Thereafter, the hospital normally functioned with at least two attached surgical teems.

Aside from the anticipated strains and excitement connected with starting to operate for the first time under combat conditions, the only significant snag during Operation 1 was the holdup in evacuation of patients to the beach and to air-strips resulting from adverse weather conditions.

From June 19 until June 27, the hospital had utilized 40 prisoners of war, mainly as litter bearers and mess helpers. On this day the prisoners were returned to a POW enclosure and replaced by some 38 Polish civilians obtained from a Civil Affairs "cage". The men, formerly forced laborers in a German Todt battalion in the Cherbourg region, were the first of a group (which for a few days in August numbered sixty-eight) to be employed in an experiment which turned out to be highly successful. The energy and willingness of the Polish workers surpassed all expectations. The hospital benefited from the freedom from the resentment and hostility frequently felt by wounded American soldiers when in the presence of prisoners serving in the hospital. A few of the Polish workers drifted from the hospital during the summer, and nearly half of them left in early November, some to another


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evacuation hospital and many of the youngest and best workers to join the Polish Army Forces in France and England. Fifteen were still with the hospital at the end of the year in the role of civilian employees-a status which had been attained for them in October.

On the first day of July, Company "A" of the 91st Medical Gas Treatment Battalion was attached to the hospital and moved into a connecting field. A welcome adjunct, the unit rendered invaluable assistance for a period of slightly more than two weeks. Personnel of the organization worked both in the main hospital and in wards set up in their own tents. A few minor operations were performed at tables in their own operating room. Several officers and nurses from the 77th Evacuation Hospital, which had been assigned a large field near the hospital, were attached also for duty from July 8 to July 16 when their own hospital began to function.

On July 17, the last day of this operation, the hospital was visited by Secretary of Henry L. Stimson, accompanied by Lieutenant Generals Bradley and Patton. Secretary Stimson went through the operating room and several wards with General Bradley.

After twenty-eight and a half days of operation the hospital closed at midnight. The remaining patients were taken over in situ by the 32nd Evacuation Hospital, and attached units were relieved.

The volume and continuity of work accomplished by a


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[newspaper clipping of Stimson visit]


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single hospital-shown in the following special operations report for the period-presents its own eloquent commentary on the Cherbourg campaign.

PERIOD OF OPERATION: 28 ½ days, 19 June - 17 July 1944

TOTAL ADMISSIONS: 4673 (Informal, 537 in addition)

DAILY AVERAGE: 163.9

TOTAL SURGICAL OPERATIONS: 2563

DAILY AVERAGE: 89.9

GREATEST NUMBER ADMISSIONS IN ONE DAY: 350 (July 7 T/O 400 beds)

GREATEST NUMBER DISPOSITIONS IN ONE DAY: 244 (July 7)

GREATEST NUMBER PATIENTS IN HOSPITAL: 667

GREATEST NUMBER SURGICAL OPERATIONS IN ONE DAY: 137 (July 10)

GREATEST SURGICAL BACKLOG: 275 (July 7)

DEATHS:

On Admission 1

In Operating Room 2

Post Operative 29

Other 34

TOTAL DEATHS 66

PERCENTAGE OF POST OPERATIVE DEATHS TO TOTAL OPERATIONS: 1.2%

July 18th marked the beginning of a welcome rest period of just under two weeks. Six days were spent in bivouac about a half mile from the site of the operation, followed by a similar stay in the vicinity of Lison, Normandy. At the latter site the hospital watched from a comfortable distance the bombings of the Saint Lo region and the beginnings of the breakthrough.


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Chart, Chart of Daily Direct Admissions, Operation 1[not reproduced, statistics on page 13]


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On the 3lst of July the hospital moved to a site about four miles east of Saint Lô, opening at noon on the next day. The hospital set up for Operation 2 in a large field, uneven by nature and now pock-marked by bomb and shell craters of various sizes. Several duds, shells, and mines were removed from the field before occupation. The field was always dry, and before many days of activity the dust problem became well nigh intolerable. Enlisted men's pup tents and foxholes were spaced along a lane between apple trees which led to a shell of a farmhouse in and about which many dead animals were scattered when the unit arrived. Officers' and nurses' tents were pitched in an orchard and were reached through path cleared of mine fields. Along the sides and at the back of the orchard, on the arrival of the unit, were two unexploded mine fields and several bodies of German and American soldiers and civilians.

Early on August 2nd occurred the most serious accident during the entire year involving members of the organization. When personnel of the attached 502nd Medical Collecting Company drove their ration truck into the farthest corner of the adjoining field, which had been swept and reported clear by the Engineers, a German Teller-mine exploded, injuring two sergeants. An ambulance with personnel train the attached company advanced to render medical treatment, thereby setting off another mine. The ambulance having caught on fire, several officers and men from both the collecting


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company and the hospital advanced with fire extinguishers and first aid materials. One of them set off a third mine. At least one dud also went off. Altogether, the accident caused one fatality, while one officers and thirteen enlisted men required medical treatment and hospitalization. In all but three cases, the injuries were sustained by members of the 502nd Medical Collecting Company. Two of the casualties among hospital personnel had to be evacuated and had not been returned at the end of the year. The Purple Heart Medals awarded to the men injured in this incident were the only ones awarded to the members of this organization during the year. Engineers again inspected the hospital areas for mines and also gave a demonstration of the mechanism of mines, explaining what had happened.

On the 4th of August the largest number of operations in any one twenty-tour hour period in the year were performed, namely, 145-a figure which no member of the unit would have thought possible during training in England or America. Two days later 221 patients were evacuated, the largest number in a twenty-four hour period throughout the year.

The stage was thus set for another highwater mark for the hospital. At about four o'clock on August 8, word was received that two hundred casualties were to arrive that evening. Within an hour casualties appeared in an ever-increasing stream until the hospital tents were filled to overflowing. About two hundred of the lesser


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wounded were placed on litters and blankets under the trees along the entrance. Altogether nearly five hundred patients arrived in about four hours. In a twelve-hour period between 1800, August 8 and 0600, August 9, the patients actually admitted into the hospital numbered 412, while all the rest had been put under cover.

Naturally enough, therefore, August 8 showed the year's greatest figure for admissions in a day, namely, 476. The next day, August 9, began with the largest surgical backlog of the year, 295. Before midnight, however, all the major operations had been completed, and within another twenty-four hours the surgical backlog had been reduced to nothing-a remarkable achievement for the operative section of the hospital. The hospital closed for admissions at noon on August 10, but continued to evacuate patients until the 27th when the 617th Medical Collecting Company took over the remaining patients.

Bronze Star Medals, the first decorations received by members of the 67th Evacuation Hospital were awarded on August 11 to one ward nurse (post-operative) and two enlisted men (an X-ray and a surgical technician). 2nd Lieutenant Miller's medal is believed to have been the first awarded to a feminine member of the American armed services during the Western European campaign.

On the sixteenth of August the hospital moved one hundred miles for Operation 3 at an attractive site on the grounds of a country mansion with an ancient moat just outside Gorron,


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Mayenne. The hospita1 proper was set up in fields on one side of a long lane of old beech trees, enlisted and officer's tents were pitched in an orchard on the other side, while the nurses enjoyed a separate garden area behind stone walls. The hospital admitted patients for only four days but remained in its beautiful surroundings for ten more days.

The first and only death among the personnel of the 67th Evacuation Hospital occurred on August 18, when Technician 5th Grade Earl Seawright died as a result of injuries received when a truck in which he was a passenger overturned while he was on detached service with the 1st Medical Supply Depot.

The longest convoy movement during the year was undertaken on the last two days of August. After travelling 230 miles to the city of Arpajon, southeast of Paris, orders were received about six o'clock to continue immediately to Pierre Levée, a distance of more than fifty miles. By travelling all night the movement was finally completed about 0900.

The hospital was at once set up in a large pasture near the 51st Field Hospital, which was closed soon after this hospital opened at noon August 31. The unit was tired but proud that it had been able to move nearly three hundred miles in 24 hours and at the same tine to set up and open the hospital within thirty hours after such a long movement had begun. Morale was at a very high level. Nearly a third of the patients treated during this


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short operation were Germans. The hospital closed for admission on September 7 and the last patient of Operation 4 was evacuated four days later. Nine days of rest ensued.

After several days of "infiltration" movement to Lentsweiler [Lentzweiler], Luxembourg, the scene of Operation 5, was completed at 2000 hours, 24 September 1944. The distance covered exceeded two hundred miles, the last seventy miles being through the Forest of the Ardennes.

For ten days the hospital operated under the most exasperating physical conditions encountered during the year. Tents were pitched in stubble fields which had been ploughed this year so that what with the almost constant rain, it had become a mud-patch even before the hospital was set up. Engineers valiantly attempted to make roads, but bogged down after making the first row of tents accessible to ambulances. A double ward tent was successfully employed for receiving. On October 4, the remaining patients were turned over to the 617th Medical Clearing Company.

The period from October 5th to the 29th passed swiftly and pleasantly in bivouac at Stavelot, Belgium, an interesting old town which was to become well known to Americana two months later. Enlisted men were housed in the communal school and in the boys' college. Nurses and a few officers lodged in a hotel, and the remaining officers enjoyed billets in private homes. The period was profitably spent in cleaning and checking equipment and in making


Chart, Chart of Direct Admissions By Operation [not reproduced, statistics on page 56]


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plans for future operations as well as in a little more resting.

On the last day of October a move of only eight miles was made to Malmedy, Belgium, where the hospital operated for seven weeks. Operation 6 was both the longest and final operation of the year. For the first time buildings-formerly barracks of the Belgian Army-were used. The main building provided room for eight wards and the X-ray and Laboratory sections on the first two floors, the quarters of officers and nurses, the Red Cross, and headquarters on the second floor and wings5 and the enlisted quarters and day-room on the third floor. Tents for receiving and the enlisted mess were the only ones set up. After two weeks the enlisted mess was moved indoors. Receiving occupied four ward tents in the shape of a large H with connecting canvas. A large garage furnished room for an operating room and surgical wards. Smaller buildings flanking the entrance served as offices for the Registrar and the Chaplain. Another large building was utilized for the dental and EENT clinics and for the officers' mess and clubroom. Supply occupied a large barn.

V-bombs went over Malmedy and the hospital almost every day, but the nearest of these infernal engines fell over a half a mile away.

The hospital celebrated the first anniversary of its departure from the shores of America on Thanksgiving Day when the unit was honored in having as guests for dinner Major General


[no page 21 in renumbered manuscript in National Archives and Records Administration-ed.]

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Albert W. Kenner and Brigadier General (then Colonel) John A. Rogers, First US Army Surgeon. Two days later General Kenner and the Army Surgeon inspected the hospital in operation.

An important change in enlisted personnel occurred with the assignment of 33 men from the disbanded 479th Ambulance Company and the transfer of a like number to other units. A month later nineteen men were transferred to medical unite of the 2nd Infantry Division and replacements obtained.

Artillery shells falling in and around Malmedy at 0545, 0800, and 1300 hours on December 16 ushered in what proved to be the most eventful week for this hospital since the landing in Normandy. A few fragments from the shells fired during the first two sallies fell within the hospital area, but injured no one and did no damage.

By two o'clock on the following afternoon the movement of civilians, soldiers, and heavy equipment along the main road suggested that the hospital, too, might have to move. The order to depart without equipment was given at about 1630 hours. Nurses left at 1700 hours, followed by officers at 1810 and enlisted personnel from 1830 with 2100 hours. Attached surgical teams and litter-bearers accompanied the unit. The movement was slow, owing to almost solid lines of trucks going north and west against continuous lines of other vehicles, mainly armored vehicles and ambulances, going in the direction of both Stavelot and Malmedy.


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Only the vital headquarters and registrar's records were taken at that time. The night was spent at Spa at the 4th Convalescent Hospital with the "refugees" from other medical units forced to flee on that fateful day.

On both the 16th and 17th of December many casualties had arrived at the hospital so that when withdrawal became necessary some two hundred patients were still in the hospital. The following three officers, five nurses (volunteers), and forty enlisted men remained to care for and to evacuate the remaining patients:

Captain William T. Van Huysen MC [MC, Medical Corps]

Captain Norman Hagopian MC

Captain William N. Baker MAC [MAC, Medical Administrative Corps]

1st Lt Anna M. Aslakson ANC [ANC, Army Nurse Corps]

1st Lt Nina L. Bareham ANC

1st Lt Sally J. Casement ANC

1st Lt Ethel Gilbert ANC

1st Lt Elizabeth J. Stuber ANC

S/Sgt William Anderson MD [MD, Medical Department]

S/Sgt Joseph J. Wysocki MD

Tec 3 Warren D. Blaylock MD

Tec 3 Winford L. Graham MD

Tec 3 Norman E. Long MD

Tec 3 Thaddeus J. Naskiewicz MD

Tec 4 Thomas Coffman MD

Tec 4 Warren W. Hallsell MD

Tec 4 Dal C. Holland, Jr. MD

Tec 4 William P. Shrader MD

Tec 4 William C. Snider MD

Tec 4 John J. Zysk MD

Cpl Cecil V. Horton MD

Cpl Edward Stevens, Jr. MD

Cpl Ralph D. Young MD

Tec 5 Howard J. Hancock MD

Tec 5 W. J. Newbolt MD

Tec 5 Wiley R. Oliver MD

Tec 5 James G. Walker MD

Pfc Ollie F. Barfield MD

Pfc Irven Bierman MD


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Pfc Damon H. Burkeen MD

Pfc Woodrow N. Littleton MD

Pfc Christopher W. Nagle MD

Pfc Clyde N. Snyder MD

Pfc Luther B. Tabor MD

Pfc Howard I. Tilley MD

Pfc Joe Vietti MD

Pfc Jewel C. Webb MD

Pfc Calvin H. Weber MD

Pfc Alvia Young MD

Pvt Donal R. Barnhart MD

Pvt Helmut M. Boehm MD

Pvt Charles W. Carr MD

Pvt Charles Miller MD

Pvt Warren G. Neal MD

Pvt Paul Roberts MD

Pvt James T. Rose MD

Pvt Elmer L. Schrader MD

Pvt Jack N. Troll MD

More than ten operations were performed that evening. Five ambulance drivers attached from the 464th Medical Collecting Company bravely evacuated the patients under increasingly hazardous conditions. Before noon hospital personnel except for those listed below were able to rejoin the unit. The last patient left safely in the afternoon. Captain Van Huysen and the following seven enlisted men stayed at the hospital site as guards over the hospital equipment:

Tec 4 Thomas Coffman MD

Tec 4 William P. Shrader MD

Cpl Edward Stevens, Jr. MD

Tec 5 William B. Reed MD

Pfc Christopher N. Nagle MD

Pfc Clyde N. Snyder MD

Pfc William J. Wilson MD

Certificates of Merit were later awarded to the officers and nurses and to several of the enlisted men, all enlisted men being commended for their unselfish devotion to duty.


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While the hospital at Malmedy was being cleared, personnel went on to a second stopping place on their westward flight at a large and old chateau near Harze. Only one night was spent there, for it was too near to the approaching enemy tanks. Aerial and tank skirmishes occurred at no great distance during the night and paratroopers were dropped about five miles away. On the following morning without delay officers and nurses moved farther westward across the Ourthe River to a chateau at Terwagne, and enlisted men continued on to Huy on the Meuse River.

On the afternoon of December 20, a party of 6 officers and 77 enlisted men returned in several vehicles to obtain the equipment left under guard at Malmedy. Infantry troops were found occupying the former hospital, with a battalion aid station set up in what had been the operating room. Between 2200 hours, when the group arrived and 0300 hours on the 21st, some twenty-eight trucks were loaded. One of the major lines of the German attacks had approached to within a half mile of the hospital, and small arms fire was frequently heard. For a few hours officers and men slept as best they could before returning in the morning. The rear guard came back with the others, the last group reaching Huy about 1800 hours.

This action was carried out without any harm to hospital personnel beyond a dent in an officer's helmet made by a sniper's bullet at Malmedy. The gas tanks on several trucks were hit but


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the holes were plugged with sticks and adhesive tape. All major items of equipment were saved, the only losses being a few instruments and one trailer. Thus, as a result of valiant effort on the part of all officers and men participating in these actions, much valuable Medical Department equipment was saved from possible capture by the enemy and from certain pillage and destruction. Most of the recovered equipment was stored at the Medical Supply Depot in Dolhain, and a small detail was left there.

On December 23 personnel of the hospital went still further west to Namur on the final move of the year, installing themselves in two schools. The movement of equipment to Namur extended over several days.

Christmas Day found the unit well billeted after a week of retrograde action dictated by the tactical situation. An excellent turkey dinner was served, even though it lacked some of the items listed on the printed menu. These souvenirs could not be given out until later, since the printer, thinking the unit had been captured, failed to get them out on time.

The last days of the year were spent in sorting, checking, and cleaning equipment and in otherwise taking stock. Replacement of unit and personal equipment was accomplished.

December 31 saw the 67th Evacuation Hospital ready once again for action and for Operation 7.


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REPORT OF PERSONNEL

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

Changes in Status of Personnel during Period from 1 January 1944 to 16 June l944

TRANSFERS

TRANSFERRED IN

TRANSFERRED OUT

Officers :

6

6

Nurses :

10

10

Enlisted Men :

36

30

PROMOTIONS

Officers : 11 Nurses: 3

AWARDS

Good Conduct Medals awarded to 36 Enlisted Men 16 May 1944.

ATTACHED

Detachment "F", 456th Quartermaster Laundry Company (Sem), composed of 1 Officer and 33 Enlisted Men attached to this organization 17 April 1944.

CASUALTIES

Private David Underwood burned seriously during field maneuvers in England.

Changes in Status of Personnel during Period from 17 June 1944 to 31 December 1944:

TRANSFERS

TRANSFERRED IN

TRANSFERRED OUT

Officers :

10

11

Nurses :

6

7

Enlisted Men :

52

57


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PROMOTIONS

Officers : 1

Nurses : 20

Battle Field Appointments to 2nd Lieutenant, MAC:

1 Warrant Officer

1 First Sergeant

Appointed Warrant Officer, Junior Grade:

1 Master Sergeant

AWARDS

7 Bronze Star Medals awarded to 3 Officers, 2 Nurses, and 2 Enlisted Men for meritorious service rendered in connection with enemy action in France and Belgium.

Certificate of Merit awarded to 1 Nurse for meritorious achievement as Chief Nurse.

Unit authorized to wear 2 Bronze Service Stars for combat participation.

CASUALTIES

Non-Battle (disease)

72

Non-Battle (injuries)

3

Battle Casualties

3

Deaths

1


APPENDIX A

REPORT OF OPERATIVE SECTION


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REPORT OF OPERATIVE SECTION

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

OPERATIVE STATISTICS

Total number of patients operated upon

4946

Number whose wounds were caused by missiles

4646 (93.94%)

Severe

Slight

Single wounds

1098 (24%)

1418 (30%)

Multiple wounds

1080 (23%)

1050 (23%)

Operations on the Head and Neck

580 (12.5%)

Skull and Brain Operations

60

Other Scalp

110

Eye

15

Ear

5

Face

93

Nose

14

Plastic Repair of Mouth

38

Neck Operations

5

Other Debridements

240

Operations on the Trunk

763 (16.4%)

Thoracic Operations

57

Combined Thoraco-Abdominal

17

Abdominal Explorations (Intestinal Injuries - 82)

148

Genito-Urinary Operations

36

Laminectomy

4

Other Debridements

501

Operations of Extremities

3303 (71.1%)

Compound Fractures

1414

Peripheral Nerve Injuries

66

Ligation Major Vessels

52

Other Debridements

1570

Major Amputations (Elective - 50)

108

Minor Amputations (Fingers and Toes)

100


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Total Number plaster casts

1501

Cases of Anerobic Infections

67

Post-Operative Mortalities

59 (1.2%)

Anesthetics Administered
(Sodium Pentothal - 3799) (81%)

4702

REMARKS ON PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

The principles of operative treatment as outlined in Section B, Manual of Therapy, May 1944, and all subsequent directives and circular letters were followed habitually. It was found that these principles were sound and resulted in a very low incidence of infection and a very low mortality rate. The anesthesia was highly satisfactory with only one mortality directly attributable to this. A moderate number of laryngeal spasms were encountered but were easily controlled. In general the resuscitative treatment before and during an operation was highly satisfactory, constituting an important factor in the low incidence of operative mortality. It was found that this was due to generous use of whole blood. Special studies were made of the cases presenting evidence of anerobic infection. The results of this have been compiled and accepted for publication in the Medical Bulletin, Office of the Chief Surgeon, ETO. During a relatively quiet period Staff Conferences were organized of which there were four as follows:

9 November 1944-

1. Discussion and review of cases of gas gangrene.

2. Discussion of use of Filbrin [fibrin-ed.] Foam and Pro Thrombrin.


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23 November 1944-

1. Discussion of experiences in anesthesia.

2. Discussion of experiences in anesthetic emergencies.

30 November 1944-

Discussion of Circular Letter No 131, Office of the Chief Surgeon, ETO, subject: Care of Battle Casualties.

7 December 1944-

Experiences in treatment of shock.

LOCAL HOSPITAL IMPROVISATIONS:

1. Removable attachment to arm board as syringe holder used in intravenous anesthesia (Plate I).

a. This is constructed of scrap metal and two 30 cc syringe clips removed from an anesthesia set. It is easily attached to an arm board and can be moved to any position desired.

2. Metal frame for suspension of arm or leg to facilitate application of plaster casts (Plate II).

a. It is constructed of ½ inch gas pipe on a jeep brake drum used as a floor base. It is easily adaptable to any position. Its use facilitates the application of a plaster cast to an extremity and obviates the necessity of holding the extremity manually. It is a definite time and effort saver.

3. Mimeographed Form (Plate III) having a three fold function,

a. Operative Request: this form it instituted by the pre-operative or shock ward officer and submitted to the operating room. It contains the time of examination, complete diagnosis, the x-ray report, and his opinion of the patients' operative priority.


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Plate I


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Plate II


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Plate III


APPENDIX B

REPORT OF MEDICAL SERVICE


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REPORT OF MEDICAL SERVICE

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

I: FUNCTION OF THE WARD SECTION

The ward Section of the 67th Evacuation Hospital, Semimobile, was charged with the pre-operative and post-operative care of all patients in addition to the care of medical cases. To accomplish this mission, the pre-operative care of patients was handled in either the shock section or the pre-operative section personnel and equipment having been divided into two sections. Patients were classified by the receiving officer and sent to a shock or preoperative ward. Severe cases were labeled with a piece of gauze marked with blue ink so as to attract the attention of the ward officer, thereby insuring immediate attention. It was necessary to have one ward officer for the pre-operative ward and one for the shock ward present at all times.

Post-operative cases were cared for in eight double post-operative wards. Two officers were assigned to each shift to supervise this care. Post-operative cases were further segregated as to nature of injury so that all abdominal cases were on one ward, all chest cases on another ward, and so forth. Medical cases were segregated in one ward, and during periods of greatest activity the number of such cases was usually small. Other post-operative cases were put in the remaining wards. Whenever the turn-over of cases was rapid, it was difficult for the two ward officers on each


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shift to give close personal attention to each case. The ward officers were aided greatly by the competent and efficient nursing staff, with the end result that every case was given excellent attention and checked thoroughly before evacuation.

II WARD SET-UP

a. Tentage: All ward tents were set up end to end as double wards and laced together in the middle. On each end the entrances were blacked-out by the use of steel frames covered with canvas. The usual allotment of tentage was as follows:

Pre-Operative Ward - 2 double wards or four ward tents

Shock Ward - 1 double ward or two ward tents

Wards (numbered 1 to 8 incl) - 16 ward tents

b. Bed Capacity:

Pre-Operative Wards - 80 beds

Shook Ward - 30

Post-Operative Wards - 30

Abdominal - 30

Chest - 30

6 Others (40 in each) - 240

Total Number of Beds in Wards - 410

c. Ward Equipment: The ward chests were arranged so as to form shelves and a desk for the nurse. This was located in the center of the double tent and utilized the dead space at that point. Bed pans and urinals were kept at the end of the ward and arranged on racks for drainage and aeration. Sterile dressings


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and dressing sets were kept on hand and replenished from the hospital central supply.

d. Improvisations:

(1) Back Rest. This was made as shown in diagram. It was well worth the effort of obtaining, being light, collapsible and indispensable for chest cases. (See Plate I)

(2) Plasma Stands. These were made by bending a hook end of a six foot rod and inserting the sharp end into the ground. (Plate II)

(3) Wangensteen Apparatus. On occasions it was necessary to complement the supply of this item. An usuable substitute was made with vacuolitre bottles and rubber tubing. While not so effictent as the regular type, the improvised Wangensteen apparatus served its purpose for short periods.

(4) Litter Holders. Cross sticks of cots were so as to increase the height by 10 inches. Litters could be put on the cot frames. This lessened the strain on personnel bending over patients for long periods.

e. Layout of Wards: The wards were established as near to the operative theater as possible. Due consideration to shortening the litter haul was made. Pre-operative cases were never mixed with post-operative cases for fear of losing or delaying operative procedure. The diagrams (Plate III and IV) show the usual set-up, which was altered only on one occasion because of the nature of the terrain. On this occasion there was a large bomb crater almost


[Editor's Note on Pagination--In the NARA repaginated copy in RG 112, the plates and text were mixed up, Plate I is p. 45, Plate II is p. 42, Plates III & IV is p. 43, the last page of text is p.44. For the reader's convenience, what was apparently the original order has been restored.


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in the center of the hospital area and the wards had to be shifted to one side of the crater.

III EVACUATION

Evacuation was, primarily, not a function of the ward section, however, it was the duty of the ward sections to determine the cases to be evacuated and then to prepare them for timely evacuation. All Army and ETOUSA directives were closely followed as to types of cases to be held for further post-operative treatment. All records were prepared by the ward personnel and checked by the Chief of Medical Service before submitted to the Registrar for typing.

The chief nurse on duty for each shift kept a chart on vacant and occupied beds on each ward and periodically notified the operating room of changes. Patients were loaded into ambulances directly from wards.


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Plate I


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Plate II


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Plate III/IV


Set Up of Operating Rooms


APPENDIX C

ACTIVITIES OF X-RAY DEPARTMENT


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ACTIVITIES OF X-RAY DEPARTMENT

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

PROCEDURE:

a. All procedures in this department were done according to the US Army directives and circulars. Anterior-posterior and lateral films were taken on all extremities. The same procedure was followed with injured chests, abdomens, and skulls.

b. Fluorosoopic examination of patients for foreign bodies and fractures was carried out only as an emergency procedure. Gastro-intestinal series and barium enemas were done only on cases which were thought to be interesting and unusual.

c. Portable X-Ray Examinations: Genito-urinary X-ray studies were done in the operating room when the X-ray machine could be moved, otherwise they were done in the department. Portable chest films were taken whenever and wherever possible.

d. Reports: Duplicate reports were rendered on all patients examined.

e. Special studies were done on the recommendation of this department after discussion with the chiefs of services.

STATISTICS:

The statistics are listed and broken down as to the various parts of the body X-ray'd. The largest number of patients that were completed in one 24-hour period was 207, done during Operation 2 on August 7th. This necessitated the use of about 450 films. The


(47)

largest number of films taken on any one patient was 23.

Chests

1379

Abdomens

566

Pelves

382

Spines

400

Skulls

706

Extremities

3947

Teeth

141

Total No of Cases X-Ray'd

7321

Total No of Patients X-Ray'd

5880

Total No of Films Used

13,740

IMPROVEMENTS:

a. Fluoroscopic Hood: A fluoroscopic hood was devised whereby two individuals could do the fluoroscopic examination at the same tine. The hood was designed to save time, space, and to allow for a quick fluorosoopic examination. The machine could be set up anywhere. And mainly was it designed at the tine because we only had one dark room issued. The attached diagram shows how it was made. Materials used were blackout material, ordinary wire, elastic, and ordinary clothing snappers. (See Plate I)

b. Drying of Films: Evacuation hospitals are not supplied with sufficient hangars to make use of the issued dryer. Therefore, a dark room tent was set up in the rear of the X-ray department. An automobile heater with a blower was found in a salvage dump and repaired by an ordnance company. Films were pinned on rope lines overhead in the drying room. About 60 films could be dried at the same time which took approximately 30 minutes to dry. Films sent to surgery were dry and in preservers.


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Plate I Flouroscopic Hood


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SUPPLIES:

All supplies were received as necessary. At no time did the department have any shortages of films or solutions.

RECOMMENDATION:

a. An evacuation hospital of this type should not be issued a dryer, a heating and cooling unit, or more than 2 dark room tents.

b. Personnel to run an efficient department requires at least 8 men.


APPENDIX D

ACTIVITIES OF LABORATORY DEPARTMENT


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ACTIVITIES OF LABORATORY DEPARTMENT

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

Until the hospital received its equipment, personnel of the laboratory and pharmacy section devoted their time to learning and reviewing technical procedures and in discussing the preparations which would have to be made for the expected invasion. A training program covering all phases of the work of the section was instituted by Major Leroy E. Guice, the first of three laboratory officers during the year.

After equipment was received, the hospital was set up twice in the field, and a general pattern for operation in one ward tent was worked out as the SOP for the section.

In preparing for the Channel crossing, the section used one 2 ½-ton truck with trailer. Several technical improvisations had to be effected before the handling of the two kerosene-burning refrigerators, a metal frame was welded onto the back of each refrigerator so that it could be carried by six men. A folding microscope table, six feet in length when folded and ten feet in length when set up, was designed, complete with drawers and a staining tray.

OPERATION 1: 19 June - 17 July 1944. During the move from England to the first operating site in Normandy, no equipment was lost or broken. Although a great number of casualties entered the hospital, the laboratory was called on for very little work during the first two weeks.

During the entire operation, the supply of whole blood from the


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ETO Blood Bank was satisfactory. To solve the problem of slow flow of blood during transfusions, a simle-pressure devise, consisting of an empty vacolitre bottle, was attached to the airway of the bottle of blood. Pressure was built up by a sphygmomonometer bulb. Transfusions were drawn for a number of patients who had had reactions from stored blood. Post-mortems were performed on request.

Toward the close of the period the laboratory became more active, a considerable number of malaria smears being examined. Contact was maintained with the 10th Medica1 Laboratory, where work which could not be accomplished by the department was sent.

OPERATION 2: 1 August - 14 August 1944. Major Nathan B. Bluestone became laboratory officer after Major Guice was evacuated because of ill health.

At the second site the supply of blood from the Blood Bank proved inadequate and had to be supplemented with fresh blood. Donors were secured from replacements at nearby depots, military police, and walking wounded. The Army transfusion sets were useless for drawing large numbers of transfusions because of the difficulty in cleaning them for reuse. A simplified system was substituted, namely, the employment of sterile vacolitre bottles and suction from a Higginson syringe. A separate tent was set up for drawing transfusions, there blood was drawn in considerable amounts and kept for not more than twenty-four hours in the icebox.

In aiding the diagnosis of gas gangrene, slides were examined


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and cultures forwarded to the 10th Medical Laboratory. A practical technique for examining smears from affected tissue was worked out by Tec Sgt Naskiewicz, and through his method laboratory diagnosis of the presence of the clostridium Welchii was made in many cases. Culture reports substantiated practically all positive reports on smears obtained through this method, when both procedures were done. All reports relating to gas gangrene were submitted to the chief of surgical service.

OPERATION 3: 16 August- 26 August 1944. During the third period of operations the number and diversity of 1aboratory tests increased. Communication with the 10th Medical Laboratory was poor, owing to the distance involved. Major Roderick L. McDonald succeeded Major Bluestone as laboratory officer.

OPERATION 4: 31 August - 12 September 1944. The supply of blood was adequate during this period. Contact with the 10th Medical Laboratory was not practical since that unit was more than one hundred and fifty miles away.

OPERATION 5: 23 September- 5October 1944. At Lentzweiler, Luxembourg, with a considerable number of medical patients being admitted, a corresponding increase in laboratory work resulted. Contact with the 10th Medical Laboratory was good.

OPERATION 6: 31 October - 17 December 1944. For the first time the hospital occupied buildings, and for the major part of this period it functioned practically as a station hospital. A large number of medical patients were admitted, and a corresponding volume of


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Laboratory work was done. All items of equipment were used extensively. Contact with the 10th Medical Laboratory was satisfactory.

The need for a power centrifuge and an incubator was acutely felt, the first for satisfactorily performing a large number of tests on blood, including sedimentation rates and hematocrits, and the second chiefly to expedite by improvisation and use of the facilities of the 10th Medical Laboratory, the diagnosing of diphtheria.

During this operation, a fairly complete laboratory service was afforded the hospital. Icteric indices and blood sulfa levels were determined in the laboratory. All other blood chemistries, all cultures and pathological specimens for study were sent to the 10th Medical Laboratory.

This busy period of operation terminated without warning in a tactical withdrawal by the unit.

Two enlisted men from the section remained behind as guards from the 17th to the 21st of December, when it became possible to evacuate the equipment. No laboratory equipment was lost or abandoned.


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STATISTICAL REPORT OF LABORATORY DEPARTMENT

OPERATIONS

EXAMINATIONS

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

TOTALS

Blood Counts

210

94

41

38

170

649

1512

Urinalysis

138

59

45

27

136

991

1782

Malarial Smears

144

43

7

22

13

22

255

Miscellaneous

125

89

83

38

74

340

913

Tests forward to 10th
Medical Laboratory

Blood Kahns

25

15

39

10

92

112

349

Spinals

0

0

3

0

0

0

3

Cultures

9

15

9

0

87

102

286

Blood Chemistries

0

0

0

0

22

5

41

Pathologies

0

0

0

0

32

9

45


APPENDIX E

REPORT OF REGISTRAR AND RECEIVING SECTIONS


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REPORT OF REGISTRAR AND RECEIVING SECTIONS

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

The Office of the Registrar functioned in accordance with directives from higher headquarters, preparing the necessary Medical Department records. The office also served as information center, receiving many inquiries concerning patients.

The statistics which follow indicate the volume of work required of this section.

The Hourly Census Chart furnished a convenient index to the number of patients in the hospital at any given time.

A valuables tag in German-translated by a hospitalized German medical officer-was adopted late in the year.


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STATISTICAL TABLE OF DIRECT ADMISSIONS

LOCATION - PERIOD

DISEASE

INJURY

WOUNDED

TOTAL

OTHERS

GRAND TOTAL

OPERATION I
19 June 44 -17 July 44
Ste Mère Église, France

608

246

3365

4219

454

4673

OPERATION II
1 Aug 44 - 14 Aug 44
Berigny, France

292

49

1202

1543

83

1626

OPERATION III
16 Aug 44 - 26 Aug 44
Gorron, France

139

33

274

446

36

482

OPERATION IV
31 Aug 44 - 11 Sept 44
Pierre Levée, France

82

31

231

344

50

394

OPERATION V
24 Sept 44 - 5 Oct 44
Lentzweiler, Luzembourg

373

138

489

1000

20

1020

OPERATION VI
31 Oct 44 - 18 Dec 44
Malmédy, Belgium

1551

595

1080

3226

57

3283

TOTALS

3055

1092

6641

10,778

700

11,478


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STATISTICAL TABLE OF INFORMAL ADMISSIONS

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

PERIOD

TIME

NUMBER

OPERATION I

1200 Hours
19 June 44

2400 Hours
17 July 44

537

OPERATION II

1200 Hours
1August 44

0900 Hours
9 August 44

0

OPERATION III

1200 Hours
16 August 44

1200 Hours
20 August 44

9

OPERATION IV

1200 Hours
31 August 44

1200 Hours
7 September 44

58

OPERATION V

0001 Hours
25 September 44

1300 Hours
5 October 44

25

OPERATION VI

0800 Hours
30 October 44

1800 Hours
18 December 44

272

Total Number of InformalAdmissions 901

STATISTICAL TABLE OF OUT PATIENTS

TYPE

NUMBER

Dental

168

Laboratory

84

X-Ray

220

Physical Examinations

48

General Medical & Orthopedics

78

EENT Patients

588

Total Number of Out-Patients

1186

(The 48 Physicals are not included in the X-Ray, Laboratory, EENT and Dental totals and they all went to these clinics.)


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CLASSIFICATION OF WOUNDS

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

TOTALS

DEATHS

A. Number of Wounded Admitted "Direct"
1. US Army Troops
2. British Troops
3. French Army Troops
4. US Navy-Marine Corps
5. British and French Navy
6. Enemy Forces Personnel
7. Civilians
8. Others (RAF: 1; Canadians 2)
Total Number of Wounded Admitted "Direct"


6300
5
3
3
61
536
51
3










6962

B. General Classification of Wounds (US Army only)*
1. Slight
2. Serious
Total Number of Wounds


2893
3407


6300

C. Number of Patients with Multiple Wounds

1887

48

D. Anatomical Classification of Wounds

ADMISSIONS

1. Wounds other than Burns

a. Abdominal

194

17

b. Thoracic

871

15

c. Thoracio-Abdominal

117

3

d. Maxillo-Facial

547

1

e. Neurologic

(1) Head

395

22

(2) Spine

38

6

(3) Nerve

39

0

f. Extremities

(1) Upper

1297

2

(2) Lower

2252

13

g. Buttocks

239

6

h. Others

204

1

2. Burns--All Locations

107

0

Total Number of Wounds

6300

86


[Editor's Note--There is no page 59 in the NARA, RG 112 copy.]


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CLASSIFICATION OF WOUNDS [Continued]

ADMISSIONS

TOTALS

DEATHS

E. Classification of Wounds by Causative Agent

1. Gunshot Wounds

1374

24

2. Shell Wounds

3020

53

3. Bomb Wounds

274

4

4. Blast Injuries

85

0

5. Wounds Secondary Missiles

10

0

6. Burns

107

0

7. Others

1430

5

Total Number of Wounds

6300

86

F. Number of Transfusions (All Patients)

1. Fresh Whole Blood

40

2. Stored Blood

1582

3. Dry Plasma

2425

4. Other Blood Substitutes
(Do not include crystalloids

0

Total Number of Transfusions

4047

G. Number of Units of Penicillin Administered

260,000,000

H. Number of Amputations

1. Upper Extremities

107

2. Lower Extremities

101

Number of Amputations

208

I. Number of Cases showing Clinical Evidence of
Gas Gangrene

1. US Army

38

1

2. Other

29

1

Number of Cases of Gas Gangrene

67

2

J. Number of Wounded Evacuated to Other Hospitals

1. US Army

2184

2. Other

161

Total

2345

*(Note: B thru E pertains to US Army troops only.)


Chart, Classification of Wounds [not reproduced]

Hourly Census Chart

Property Accountability Form (In German)

Modified Form 55A


APPENDIX F

REPORTS OF EENT AND DENTAL CLINICS


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REPORT OF EENT CLINIC

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

The EENT Clinic functioned with each hospital setup, for both in-patients and out-patients. The out-patient clinic hours were from 1400 to 1700 hours each Monday, Wednesday and Friday. When the hospital operated on a station hospital basis, the clinic hours were from 0800 to 1700 daily.

In the field one half of a ward tent was used by this clinic, while in buildings, a small room was utilized, with an adjacent 15 to 20 bed ward for EENT patients.

Patients seen by the clinic in its first seven months of operation were as follows:

Total Number of EENT Patients

140

Total Number of Consultations

518

Surgical Cases

a. Major

12

b. Minor

29

Total Number of Surgical Cases

41

Total Number of Out-Patients

773

Total Number of Eye Patients
(Including Refractions)

640

Total Number of Ear, Nose and Throat Patients

133


The receiving department furnished one enlisted man for work in the clinic on a part time basis. The equipment is that of standard evacuation hospital issue.

It is recommended that an audiometer be included in the standard issue of the equipment of evacuation hospitals.


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ACTIVITIES OF DENTAL DEPARTMENT

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

From 1 January 1944 to 16 June 1944, when the unit was still in England preparing for the coming invasion, the Dental Clinic rendered service to personnel of the hospital and nearby units. During these months personnel of the section received training, and preparations were made for functioning under combat condition.

The following statistics represent the amount of work accomplished during this period:

Calculus Removal and Prophylaxis

150

Restorations

231

Gum Treatments

48

Dentures Adjusted

13

Dentures Constructed

2

Occlusions Adjusted

14

Teeth Treated

12

Teeth Extracted

13

X-Rays

19


During operations on the Continent the Dental Section was normally allotted one half of a ward tent. During the first two operations, however, part of the Surgery Section was installed in the dental tent owing to inadequate space in the main operating room. Maxillo-facial and other minor face operations were performed there. The EENT Clinic also utilized this additional operating room.


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During combat operations dental personnel at times performed various duties in Surgery. During rest periods the dental clinic was open for emergencies and for personnel of this unit.

The following statistics represent the amount of work done during operations on the Continent:

Calculus Removal and Prophylaxis

111

Restorations

205

Gum Treatments

208

Occlusion Adjusted

10

Teeth Treated

25

Teeth Extracted

181

Dentures Repaired

36

Dentures Constructed

6

Impressions Taken

28

X-Rays

241

Anaesthesia Performed

129

Fractures:

Reduction of

10

Intermaxillary Wiring

29

Splints

11

Wounds of Mouth Sutured

52

Wounds of Mouth Treated

102

Examinations

521


APPENDIX G

CHAPLAIN'S REPORT


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CHAPLAIN'S REPORT

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

Until the hospital went into buildings in Operation 6, the Chaplain's office was always a pyramidal tent, usually located near headquarters, and not far from the receiving tent. Both office and quarters for the Chaplain, this tent was always equipped with electricity and a telephone. There was also a radio to get news daily and a map on which the war situation was indicated.

The Chaplain gave out many New Testaments, prayer books, Jewish scriptures, etc, and made numerous hospital visits. Sunday and special services were arranged for members of different faiths by working with nearby Installations when necessary.

In regard to ministering to wounded men, the most effective service was rendered in the wards after the men have had surgery and some rest.

As far as can be ascertained, no Catholic has died in the hospital without having had ministration of a Catholic priest, either an Army Chaplain or civilian priest.

STATISTICAL REPORT

NUMBER

ATTENDANCE

Sunday Church Services conducted at Hospital

38

2382

Sunday Church Services at other Organizations

9

255


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NUMBER

ATTENDANCE

Week Day Services conducted for 67th Evac Hosp

6

235

Communion Services conducted for 67th Evac Hosp

2

140

Union (sic) Church Services held with other Units

2

500

Masses arranged

23

991

Personal Counsel Cases

323

Welfare Cases

10

Hospital Visits

215

Number Attended

22,715

(Many hospital visits were not counted when they were just to see one person. The ones counted have usually been when the Chaplain was visiting the whole hospital.)


APPENDIX H

REPORT OF MESS SECTION


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REPORT OF MESS SECTION

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

The Mess Section of the 67th Evacuation Hospital (Sem), may be said to have reached France at 0400 hours, 18 June 1944, after a quiet crossing on an LST. No equipment was lost or damaged during the movement. Following attachment for one day to the 91st Evacuation Hospital, the first meal prepared by the unit mess, breakfast on the 19th, was served near Saint. Mère Église, Normandy.

For nearly a month the mess drew 10-in-l rations for the personnel of the hospital and 5-in-1 rations, augmented by 25-in-1 hospital supplemental rations, for the patients. When it was discovered that the 5-in-1 rations contained insufficient vegetables for the patients, personnel of the hospital agreed to let the patients have their vegetables from the 10-in-1 ration.

About July sixth the Quartermaster "Class I" truckheads started issuing fresh bread, followed two days later by "B" rations for the hospital. From this date on, the food problem for patients was eliminated, with the exception of juices for patients, since the hospital supplemental ration did not contain a sufficient quantity of juices. No other special problem in regard to diet requirements was encountered thereafter.

The M-1937 range was found to make a very good oven for baking rolls and pastries. Metal plates cut to fit the inside of the range can be inserted, thereby making possible the baking of three pans at one tine. The necessary metal plates were made from salvage metal


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by a cooperative Ordnance company.

Thanksgiving Day brought an exceptionally fine menu. The Quartermaster "Class I" dumps issued a meal which could have been bettered only with difficulty, and the same may be said of the Christmas dinner.

For the records it should be noted that the number of meals served on a given day reached the astonishing total of 4,200 on July 6th. The hospital was filled to overflowing with patients, while the personnel of two attached hospitals, the 32nd and 77th Evacuation Hospitals, were also fed. For several weeks in June and July more than 3,000 meals were served every day.


APPENDIX I

REPORT OF QUARTERMASTER LAUNDRY


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ACTIVITIES OF QM LAUNDRY COMPANY

DETACHMENT "F"

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

On the 17th of April 1944, Detachment "F" of the 456th Quartermaster Laundry Company (SM), was attached to the 67th Evacuation Hospital, Semimobile. Although operations with both units were continued, still the work was not so heavy as it had been earlier, the main purpose at this time being preparation for the big move to the Continent where this organization would receive the acid test under actual war atmosphere. This period was spent in gathering complete equipment and supplies, and in moulding an organization which would withstand the rigors of war and perform with maximum efficiency under trying conditions.

Much valuable experience was gained at the first area in Normandy. Storage tents were not set up. An old stone barn situated alongside a running stream housed supplies and equipment and was utilized as the work tent. Minor difficulties were soon ironed out. The detachment was divided into two shifts, each shift working 8 hours, one taking the day turn and the other the night shift. The amount of work received varied, and the organization was prepared for any flow of laundry. When it was heavy, the hours of each shift were lengthened, and when it was extremely heavy, personnel worked around the clock, sometimes using the usual two shifts, each shift working 10 to 12 hours, and occasionally using three shifts of 8 hours each. As flexibly as this small well-knit organization was


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constructed to handle a large volume of work, it became apparent that a great deal depended on improvisation.

For a few days during the first operation period and the last day of the first rest period, a 1500 gallon canvas water tank, borrowed from hospital supply, was used in place of stream water for water supply. Water trucks, 700-gallon capacity, would shuttle water from water point to canvas water tank every two hours--a method which can be used in an emergency.

During Operation 2, the mechanics found the Jaeger pump faulty and improvised as follows S/Sgt Dyson constructed a platform which held the Jaeger pump and a 2-horsepower motor. By use of pulleys and a belt, the pump could be used without consumption of gasoline. The power-line came from the main control panel from one unit and was connected to an electric motor. This method was found to be highly efficient.

On Saturday, 25 November 1944, Major General Albert W. Kenner, accompanied the Commanding Officer on the regular Saturday morning inspection. General Kenner remarked that the laundry installation was by far the most practical setup he had seen in his tour through the Seventh and Ninth Armies, and as far as he had gone through the First Army. General Kenner was especially pleased to learn that in addition to its regular duties, Detachment "F" was servicing the patients' laundry each and every day in the week.

The area of Operation 6 was the most practical setup in all our operations on the Continent. The valuable experiences gained


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in all previous setups were put to good use in the installation of an ideal laundry section.

The following is a resume of the results of unit operations for the year ending l944:

UNITS

NUMBER

Clothing of Personnel

Bundles

9389

Bundles

Pounds

91,797

Hospital Linen and Miscellaneous

Pounds

251,318

Total Poundage

343,115

Hours of Actual Production

3206 ½

(Hours (clock hours) one half of amount shown. Two units in operation.)


APPENDIX J

ACTIVITIES OF NURSE PERSONNEL


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ACTIVITIES OF NURSE PERSONNEL

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

Upon arrival in England half the nurses of the 67th Evacuation Hospital were billeted in private homes and the remainder in a large old mansion which had been vacant for many years.

During the winter and spring, all nurses followed a heavy training schedule which consisted of daily classes and lectures and many hours of teaching surgical techniques arid nursing procedures to enlisted personnel. Hospital equipment was put into shape, nurses doing considerable sewing, such as making lap sheets, glove covers, and cuffs on gowns. Three large inner tent-liners, each consisting of 30 sheets, were made for the operating rooms. Nursing personnel also underwent a rigorous physical training course of drilling.

A day after arrival in France 17 June, the hospital began functioning. During the following months the nurses worked faithfully and efficiently under the moat trying conditions. The achievement of the nurses in the field represented no small contribution to the successful operation of the hospital in Western Europe. More then 15,000 patients benefited from their solicitous and skillful care.

In addition to the work expected of nurses, they have had to do many things that doctors ordinarily do in civilian life. Many lives have depended upon their judgement, initiative and ability. During


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certain emergencies it was necessary for nurses to give blood transfusions, plasma and intravenous injections. It became a common sight to enter a ward and find from 10 to 15 of these treatments being given under the supervision of a nurse.

On the "belly" ward frequently there were as many as 15 to 20 colostomies with dressings which had to be changed every few hours. One nurse remarked that in private life such a case usually had a special nurse, and was considered a difficult case; but in this hospital one nurse, with the assistance of capable enlisted technicians, took care of the entire ward.

In the operating room one nurse circulated for as many as three tables at the same time. Nurses also assisted in giving Sodium Pentothal anesthesia and even did minor debridements.

The health of the nurses has been good especially while living in tents. Owing to various illnesses and transfers, however, 15 replacements in a group of 40 have been required during the year.

Three Bronze Star Medals were awarded to nurses of the 67th Evacuation Hospital as follows:

Captain Jean R. Truckey

N-7308xx

ANC

28 December 1944

1st Lt Mary C. Willhide

N-7355xx

ANC

28 December 1944

1st Lt Alice A. Miller

N-7670xx

ANC

2 August 1944

Certificates of Merit were awarded to 6 nurses. One was awarded to 1st Lt Lois H. Grant when she left the unit in November to become Chief Nurse of the 51st Field Hospital. The other certificates went to the five nurses who stayed behind at Malmedy to care for the 224 patients who were still in the hospital when the German


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counter-offensive forced the unit to withdraw on 17 December. Every nurse volunteered to remain, the following being selected to remain:

1st Lt Anna M. Aslakson

N-7292xx

ANC

1st Lt Nina L. Bareham

N-7293xx

ANC

1st Lt Sally J. Casement

N-7671xx

ANC

1st Lt Ethel Gilbert

N-7443xx

ANC

1st Lt Elizabeth J. Stuber

N-7297xx

ANC

They were able to rejoin the rest of the hospital personnel on the morning of 18 December. Part of their experiences were put onto the "Army Hour" broadcast later.

Lt Miller went to England in September where she appeared on a "live broadcast" to America dealing with the experiences of nurses in the Western European campaigns,

Capt Truckey spent about 3 weeks at the Office of the Chief Surgeon, ETOUSA, in connection with public relations works concerning the Army Nurse Corps.


APPENDIX K

REPORT OF SUPPLY SECTION


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REPORT OF SUPPLY SECTION

67TH EVACUATION HOSPITAL, SEMIMOBILE

1944

This unit arrived in England without any T/E equipment except for very few items such as typewriters and other office equipment.

A small reception party consisting of an officer and a few enlisted men met the unit on its arrival at Dursley, England. This party had already spent several days arranging for the various billets for personnel and had drawn the various essential housekeeping items for cleaning, billeting and messing. Considerable time was spent after the unit arrived improving these conditions as various other supply items could be secured. Most of these first items were secured through the local district stores operated by the British Military.

The next procedure was the requisitioning of all the T/E equipment from the various branches of supply, which was authorized by T/O and E 8-581 dated 26 July 1943. As these items were approved by higher headquarters, and were available, notification would be received and in most cases would be picked up by the units' organic transportation.

A very complete and elaborate system of base and sub depots had been planned and set up within the United Kingdom for the purpose of receiving, organizing, and issuing the various branches of supplies. The greatest difficulty with this arrangement of depots was the distance involved travelling to and from them. This was necessary due


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to security measures, and not having all the supplies of one branch stored in one place. The breakdown of the United Kingdom into districts was extremely helpful, but it often became necessary to go outside of the original designated district to secure various allotted items of equipment. A period of six months was used drawing and collecting together all these various items of supply.

The first large item of equipment received by this unit was the Medical Unit Equipment (Item #97223). This was shipped to us by rail and came in several wagon loads. After securing a suitable apace to move this equipment into many weeks were spent by most of the unit personnel in unloading, unpacking, sorting, arranging, and issuing of these items to their respective departments where they would be used when functioning as a hospital. This took considerable time, and planning as this equipment was originally packed and shipped without any thought or consideration as to the departments it would eventually be issued. After the issue of this authorized equipment was completed many needed items were improvised and constructed and also great consideration was given to the departmental packing of this equipment for future movements.

Several weeks prior to our shipment to France, we were issued some three hundred water proof boxes by the Medical Department. These had been specially designed, manufactured, and shipped to us from the United States. Their use primarily was for packing all


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valuable and other supply items that would be spoiled by becoming wet while crossing the channel or unloading on the beaches of France. The equipment packed in these boxes were loaded on our own vehicles and would cross the channel on LST's.

The last month spent in England was an extremely busy one. All items of equipment which had not already been received had to be procured at this time. Special approval had to be obtained, and many trips made to finish this job. On some days trips were made in all directions. Before the designated deadline was reached all the unit equipment was complete and ready for shipment and loading.

The First Army Surgeons' Office had. many excess items of various branches approved and issued to the unit approximately three months prior to our shipment to France. Most of these items were of a medical nature and without these excess items this unit could never have performed the service it did upon its arrival in France.

An estimate was made of all equipment to be shipped to France as freight. This was everything other than could be transported on our own trucks. This amounted to some forty-five tons. All this equipment had to be suitably packed and ready for shipment on very short notice.

One great problem about this time was the necessary marking of some 40 ward tents with the prescribed Geneva Convention Red Cross and also the making and painting of two red cross ground markers


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100 feet square. These ground markers originally were to be items of issue, but were not received in the United Kingdom in time for issue and to date have never been received.

Late Sunday afternoon 5 June 1944, notice was received that all equipment being shipped as freight was to be loaded on our trucks and taken to the Port of Embarkation the following morning. All Sunday night was spent loading the equipment and making out the various forms for shipment. The job was finally completed by 0700 hours Monday morning and the fleet of trucks departed for the designated part where the equipment was loaded on boats to be shipped across the Channel.

Some ten days later word was received for the movement of the unit and all its equipment loaded on the trucks on which it would cross the Channel. Our fleet of trucks were split up into two groups at the port. One consisted of nine vehicles, the other eighteen. These two groups came over on two different LST's. By Sunday morning 19 June all trucks with equipment and the unit personnel were safely assembled at one sight in Normandy, France.

Within twenty-four hours our hospital was to be set up and ready to receive its first patients. This was accomplished in due order with what equipment which was taken over in our own vehicles.

As the casualties became greater in the early part of this campaign the need for our additional equipment which had been shipped by freight became more urgent. Fortunately within a few days it started arriving on the beaches and was completely account-


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ed for by the time the weather took a turn for the worse and nothing could be beached for many days. Without this additional equipment this unit could never have rendered the service so urgently needed at this time.

The only great problem of supply encountered by this unit was one regarding our power units, generators. The original units issued were not large or strong enough to stand the great load put on them. With the cooperation of First Army Engineers and the Surgeon's Office we were eventually issued adequate power units to handle the terrific load. All other minor problems of supply encountered by this unit were promptly and adequately taken care of by the various dumps already set up in France.

Many moves and set ups were made and always the much needed equipment to meet any type of problem was available and on hand.

The most valuable time spent by any unit pertaining to its organic equipment and supplies is that period spent prior to its commitment for combat service. Acquiring all authorized and needed equipment, and anticipating any needs that might arise is certainly most important.