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Report of Operations, 279th Station Hospital

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REPORT OF OPERATIONS

279TH STATION HOSPITAL

Berlin District, United States Amy

APO 755, US Army

Period beginning 8 May 1945, to

30 September 1945, inclusive


SOURCE:  National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, MD
                  Records of The Adjutant General's Office
                  World War II Operational Records, 1940-48, Medical
                  279th Station Hospital
                  Box 21844
        


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HEADQUARTERS

279th STATION HOSPITAL

Office of the Commanding Officer

Berlin District, United States Army

APO 755, US Army



INDEX


REPORT OF OPERATIONS

 

COMMANDER'S NARRATIVE REPORT                    SECTION I
PERSONNEL REPORT                     SECTION II

PLANS & TRAINING REPORT                                 SECTION III

TRANSPORTATION REPORT                                  SECTION IV

PROVOST MARSHAL REPORT                                SECTION V
RECEIVING & EVACUATION REPORT                    SECTION VI
UTILITIES REPORT                                               SECTION VII
MEDICAL REPORT                                                SECTION VIII

SURGICAL REPORT                                               SECTION IX


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Report of Operations

279th Station Hospital

21 June 1946



SECTION I



COMMANDER'S NARRATIVE REPORT

Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1. Personnel: a. 0n 8 May 1945, the Military Personnel Section of the 279th Station Hospital was with the unit at Govilon, Monmouthshire, Wales. The unit was operating with a strength of 35 male officers, 1 warrant officer, 64 female officers and 350 enlisted men. 0n 20 May 1945, the Personnel Section along with the complete organization departed from Wales at 0220, arriving at Southampton, England, at 0915 hours. At 2230 hours the unit embarked on the "US Borinquen" from Southampton arriving at Le Havre, France, at 1600 hours the following day. After arrival at Le Havre, the unit proceeded by motor transportation to Camp Twenty Grand, DuClair, France. On 26 May 1945, the unit departed from Camp Twenty Grand by rail and motor transport at 1900 hours, arriving at Eagle Main, Kent Camp, Verdun, France, on 27 May 1945, 1930 hours. On 8 August 1945, an advance unit departed this station at 0800 hours for Berlin, Germany. On 8 June 1945, the Military Personnel Section of the 279th Station Hospital, along with the unit, was assigned to Oise Intermediate Section, per Troop Assignment Order No. 99, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations.*


* On 8 September 1945, 8 officers and 20 enlisted men were put on temporary duty with the advance unit from this organization in Berlin, Germany.


b.         The outstanding accomplishment during this period, in excess of routine personnel duties, was the redeployment of personnel as they became eligible and the requisitioning and receiving of replacements to insure sufficient qualified personnel being present to efficiently operate a station hospital.


c.         The most acute problem was the procurement of qualified personnel to replace personnel lost through redeployment. However, the criteria was not low enough during this period to cause the loss of too large an amount of experienced personnel.


2.         Plans & Training: a. During the period under consideration no regular training program was in effect until 26 May 1945. Upon arrival at the Eagle Main Staging Area, Verdun, France, the majority of personnel with this unit received parallel training with other organizations in that area,


b.         Upon arrival in Berlin, Germany, all personnel was extremely active in the many duties incident to preparation of the hospital for the receipt of patients on 18 September 1945. During the remainder of the month, on-the-job training was not supplemented by any additional program.


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3. Transportation: a. At the time this hospital was stationed in the Verdun Area it was operating under T/O and E 8-560, which authorized 15 vehicles and 24 enlisted men in the Motor Transportation Section. During the training program at that time the vehicles were used for the purpose of training to fit the unit for its occupation duties, and for general housekeeping activities.


b.         Part of the transportation accompanied the advance detail to Berlin on or about 8 August 1945, and the balance arrived on or about 8 September 1945 with the main body of the hospital personnel. At that time there were 18 motor vehicles, 3 in excess of T/O and E. The new hospital site had adequate shops and a good parking lot. Upon arrival, the vehicles showed an approximate mileage of 20,000 miles each, and were in need of many minor and a few major repairs. Attempts at repair were made, but under great handicap inasmuch as spare parts and tools were extremely difficult to obtain.


c.         During the first week, the main body of motor transportation functioned primarily on housekeeping duties. On or about 18 September, at which time the hospital was officially opened to the reception of patients, the 5 assigned ambulances were used solely for the transportation of patients from the scene of accidents or other emergencies, and the transportation of patients to and from other hospital plants in Germany. The passenger transportation was used by personnel of the hospital for transaction of official business. The cargo transportation was used for housekeeping duties, such as hauling rations, unit and medical supplies, laundry, coal and coke, rubbish and ashes, in addition to hauling materials for the many construction projects at the hospital. A field autoclave was maintained and operated by men of the department, sterilizing linen and clothing from the contagious wards.


d.         The total number of miles driven during this period was 141,761; the accident rate for the same period was 2.82 per 100,000 miles.


4.         Provost Marshal: From 8 May 1945 to 18 September 1945, the activities of this department were of no special significance, but when the hospital was officially opened, adequate guard posts were established and a schedule set up for the proper safeguarding of all buildings, equipment and government property, etc. All German Civilians were checked in and out of the hospital area and were inspected for concealed items of government property such as food, clothing, etc. Each civilian vehicle leaving the post was likewise inspected.


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5. Receiving & Evacuation: a. The activity of this department may be divided into two distinct periods, 8 May to 18 September 1945, during which time the service was inactive, and 18 September to 30 September 1945, during which the section became very active. On 18 September the department was established in the main hospital building; it included the Receiving Office, Dispensary, Out-Patient Clinic, and a small prophylactic station.


Admissions during this period: 382

Dispositions: 146


b.         The Out-Patient Clinic handled 649 patients and gave a total of 821 treatments, and the clinics in various medical and surgical specialties served many units throughout the area.


c.         On 28 September 1945, the Surgeon, Berlin District, directed that all cases of suspected venereal disease be referred, undiagnosed by other dispensaries, to this hospital for hospitalization, diagnosis and treatment. This terminated the dispensary treatment of gonorrhea, and resulted in a marked increase of venereal disease admissions to hospital.


d.         The Dispensary held daily sick call for the personnel of this hospital and that of the 15th Medical Depot. One of the Dispensary's functions included immunization of personnel against communicable diseases. During this period, 388 Typhus vaccinations were administered. The number of emergency cases handled by the Dispensary was rather high, chiefly resulting from automobile accidents. Injured allied military personnel were treated, and were when necessary admitted to hospital until such time as they could be safely transferred to their own hospital. First aid and occasional emergency hospitalization was rendered to German Civilians.


6.         Utilities: a. During May, June and July 1945, this department was inactive due to the operational situation. Throughout August and September of the same year, however, the department became extremely busy sad its personnel was increased to over 100 individuals. Despite this increase, the volume of work to be accomplished still overtaxed the facilities and capacity of this department. During this period, requests to higher headquarters wore submitted for the general rehabilitation and reconstruction of the hospital plant, and work was begun accordingly. Due to the shortage of Engineer personnel, the brunt of administration and operational work fell on this section.




b.         Civilian laborers were furnished to all sections from the Utilities labor pool to aid in setting up medical supply and professional departments. A total of more than 500 work orders were accomplished during September.


c.         The entire plant located at 42-46 Unter don Eichen was requisitioned, including a total of more than 20 buildings with usable floor area of 350,000 sq ft and 22 acres of grounds. Billets for officers included 18 buildings, all located within a radius of 3 blocks of the main hospital plant. A total of 20,000 man-hours of work was accomplished by Utilities personnel during this period; this figure does not include the work done by the Engineers.


7.         Medical Service: a. Upon arrival at the Eagle Main Staging area, 27 May 1945, many of both professional and enlisted personnel were placed on detached service with other medical nuts. Those remaining at Verdun took part in such medical meetings and training programs as wore available at the post.


b.         After the official opening of the hospital in Berlin on 18 September 1945, the remainder of this month was spent principally in organizing the service into its various sections, and preparing the wards to receive patients. The unit was designated V.D. Center for Berlin District on 28 September 1945.


8.         Surgical Service: a. During the period 8 May to l8 September 1945, the Surgical Service of this hospital remained inactive. On the latter date the service consisted of 3 wards, two general surgery and one orthopedics. The operating room section was set up in the delivery rooms of the former German obstetrical department, due to damage sustained by the German operating rooms. This setup was adequate aid full use was made of German equipment and personnel.


b.         Rapid turnover of personnel, a small staff, and light service prevented regular staff meetings. Ward rounds were made frequently by the entire staff. Procedures were conservative, following theater directives. There appeared to be no need for improvisation or new methods.



*See movement orders, Inclosures #l and #2, Section II, Personnel Report.


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SECTION II


PERSONNEL REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945


1.         On VE Day, 8 May 1945, the Military Personnel Section of the 279th Station Hospital was with the unit at Govilon, Monmouthshire, Wales. The unit was operating with a strength of 35 male officers, 1 warrant officer, 64 female officers and 350 enlisted men. VE Day brought notification to 2d Lieutenants Elizabeth M. Farr, Lorraine L. Fontaine and Mary B; Graves that they had been promoted to 1st Lieutenant, effective 1 May 1945, per par 21, Special Orders 13]. of Headquarters, European Theater of Operations. On 9 May 1945, four of the nurses were notified that they had been promoted to 1st Lieutenant. on 1 May, per par 5, 30 12], Hq, ETO. They were Jonike E. Henry, Audrey G. Jones, Billie Mans, and Mildred 0. McCay. 1st Lt. Elmer S. Carlson joined this organization on 11 May 1945 from the 6868th Rehabilitation Training Detachment per par 4, SO 127, Hq, United Kingdom Base. Four nurses were notified on 13 May that they had been promoted to the grade of 1st Lt as of 1 May per par 22, SO 121, Eq, ETO. They were Mary M. Parker, Ramah I. Royal, Mary L. Smith and Dawn B. Stewart. Also on the 13th, Lucy M. Adams was promoted to let Lt per par 4, SO 121, Hq, ETO as of 1 May. 1st Lt Jack Duckstein, DC, was relieved from assignment, and assigned to the 81st General Hospital, per par 2, SO 118, Hq 12th US Hospital Center, departing that same day.


2.         On 20 May 1945 the Military Personnel Section, along with the complete organization, departed from Wales at 0220 hours and arrived at Southhampton, England at 0915 hours. At 2230 hours the unit embarked on the "US Borinquen" at Southampton, England, arriving at Le Havre, France at 1600 hours the following day. After arrival at Le Havre, the unit proceeded by motor transport to Camp Twenty Grand, DuClair, France. On 25 May 1945, five nurses were promoted to grade of 1st Lt. They were 2d Lt Aileen Lee and Elizabeth J. McEwen per par 21, SO 136, Hq, ETO, and Elizabeth C. Taff and Clare P. Tomeny per par 23 SO 136, Hq, ETO; also Lucille J. Wright per par 24, SO 136, Hq, ETO.


3.         The unit departed from Camp Twenty Grand, DuClair, France, by rail and motor transport on 26 May 1945, at 1900 hours, arriving at Eagle Main, Tout Camp, Verdun, France, on 27 May 1946 at 1930 hours. On 29 May 1946, eleven nurses were relieved from assignment and assigned to the 176th General Hospital per par 19, SO 146. They were 1st Ina F. Buller, Mary F. Hamill, Ellen Lipsey, Katherine M. Loyd, Mildred 0. MeCay, Zilda M. McNeil, Mary B. Graves, and 2d Lts Cordilia R. Ekberg, Verda A. Morrison, Kathleen A. Show, and Dawn B. Stewart.


4.         The 1st of June 1945 brought with it a list of promotions. 1st Lt Thomas A. Iacolucci was promoted to Captain per par 18, SO l36, Hq, ETO. 2d Lt. Ruth I. Bass (Physical Therapy) and 2d Lt. Cloriaas Blackock were both promoted to 1st Lt per par 18, SO 136. Alice B. Doyle, a 1st Lt in the Army Nurse Corps, and 1st Lt. Charles L. Glascock, Medical Administrative Corps, were both


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promoted to the rank of Captain per par 16, SO 136, Hq ETO. Then Omega Gasper, 2d Lt, ANC, was promoted to let Lt per par 20, SO 136, Hq, ETO, and 2d Lt. Evelyn G. Rank, ANC, was promoted to let Lt per par 22, 30 136, Hq, ETO. On 8 June 1945, the Military Personnel Section of the 279th Station Hospital along with the unit was assigned to Oise Intermediate Section per Troop Assignment Order No. 99, Hq, ETO (See Incl #1). On 17 June 1945, Captain Leo R. Pasquini, DC, was placed on US pending assignment to the 164th General Hospital per par 1, SO 141, Hq, 279th Station Hospital, and departed on 18 June 1945. On 18 June 1945, five officers were relieved from assignment and assigned to the 220th General Hospital per Letter Order AG 201 L 3-2l50 Subj: "Orders", Hq, United Kingdom Base. They were 1st Lts Shirley 4. French and Audrey G. Jones, both from the ANC, and 2d Lts Melba U. Penn, Claire U. Ritchie; also Margaret B. Sheehan, ANC. On 27 June 1945, two more officers of the Army Nurse Corps received promotion to let Lt per par 90, SO 167, Hq, ETO; they were 2d Lts Frances A. McDonnell and Anne F. Stacowicz. On the same date, Corporal John Dembec was transferred to this organization from the 448th Reinforcement Company, 19th Reinforcement Depot, and two Enlisted Men, Tec 4 Hunter B. Gunn and Pfc Lucyan J. Lewandowaki were transferred to the 16th Reinforcement Depot. On 28 June 1945, Captain Beatrice N. Bosley, ANC, was transferred to the 51st Station Hospital per par 1, SO 174, Hq, Oise Intermediate Base. On the same day, five Enlisted Men were reduced to the grade of Pvt. They were Tec 4 James B. Mitchell, Cpl Freddie M. Schmidt, Tec 5 Lawrence J. Broussard, Tec 5 Ferdenando V. Soave, and Tec 5 Carl F. McDaniel. They were reduced per par 4, SO 152, fiq, 279th Station Hospital. On 29 June 1946, two Enlisted Men were transferred to this organization per par 21, SO 177, Hq Oise Intermediate Section. They were S/Sgt Joseph F. Cleary and Pfc Melvin E. Walker. 0n 30 June 1945, Pfc Basteano J. Russo and Pfc Charles B. Stouffer were reported AWOL1 as of 0600 hours, 29 June.


5.         On 2 July 1945, Major Reuben B. Hoover was relieved from assignment and transferred to the 179th General Hospital per par 8, SO 176, Hq, ETO. On On 5 July 1945, Pvt Val. R. Carreno and Anthony Chiricheillo were transferred from the 19th Reinforcement Company to this unit per par 86, SO 180. On 7 July 1945 Sgt Reginald A. Wiglesworth was relieved from assignment and assigned to Med Section Oise Intermediate Section per par 1, 30 185, Hq, Oise Intermediate Section. On 8 July, six nurses wore promoted from 2d Lt to 1st Lt per par 5, SO 182, Hq, ETO. They were 2d Lts Teresia M. Birkenfeld, Josephone F. Burke, Jacaie C. Butler, Lois J. Francey, Dota L. Jarrell, and Paula J. Masek. Pfc John B. Straining was relieved from assignment and attached to the 16th Reinforcement Depot on 11 July 1945 per par 2, SO 188, Hq, Oise Intermediate Section. On 12 July 1945 Tec 5 Raymond D. Fanning, Cpl John A. Goulding, Cpl Robert A. Ramsdell, and Tec 5 Alfred Yudson were promoted to Tec 4 per par 1, SO 162, Hq, 279th Station Hospital. Captain David N. Trimble was relieved from assignment on 15 July 1945 and assigned to the 51st Station Hospital per par 1, SO 193, Hq, Oise Intermediate Section, U.S.F., ETO. On 16 July 1945, the unit lost


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two men, Pfc Jose Medieron and Pvt Ferinando V. Soave, who were transferred to the 254th Medical Detachment per par 1, SO 194, Hq, Oise Intermediate Section. On the sane day two men were assigned this organization from the 254th Medical Dstachment per par 1, SO 194, Hq Oise Intermediate Section. They were Tec 5 Melvin J. Griggs and Pfc Edward I. Jay. On 25 July 1945, Major Saul Solomon and Captain Carroll F. Tatum were relieved from assignment and departed the same day. Major Carl I. LeFrantin was relieved from assignment on 28 July and assigned to the 825th Convalescent Center per par 1, SO 162, Hq 819th Hospital Center. The last day in the month brought some different changes in this unit. Four enlisted men were transferred to the 127th Evacuation Hospital per par 1, SO 212. They were Sgt Douglas G. Fulton, Cpl Daniel U. Johnson, Pfc John A. Phipps, and Pfc Bennie L. Pizzuti. Too 4 Rudolph H. Valention was transferred to the 251st General Hospital per par 1, SO 212 Hq, Oise Intermediate Section.


6.         On 6 August 1945, Captain Charles J. Buchate and lst Lt Wilbur B. Swinden were assigned and joined this organization from the 127th Evacuation Hospital per par 6, SO 54, Hq, Mournelon Base Area Assembly Area Command. The following day, Captain Donald B. Jury was relieved from assignment and assigned to Hq, Delta Base Section, per par 2, SO 172, Eq 819th Hospital Center, Oise Intermediate Section, Theater Service Forces. On 8 August 1945, advance unit departed this station at 0800 hours for Berlin, Germany. This unit consisted of ten officers and thirty-three enlisted men. On 11 August 1945, Tec 3 Richard Wagner was relieved from assignment and assigned to the 897th Medical Professional Service (Third Army) per par 3, SO 176, Hq 819th Hospital Center, Olse Intermediate Section. They were Major Michael J. Grino, Major Van W. Taylor, and. Captain Irvin I. Taitz. Captain Charles R. Gillingham was assigned to this unit from the Zd General Hospital per par 3, SO 122, Hq 820th Hospital Center, Oise Intermediate Section, 20 August 1945. 0n the next day, Captain Alexander O. Kleinman was assigned and joined from the 198th General Hospital per par 7, SO 67, Hq Mourmelan Sub Area Assembly Area Command. The 22nd of August saw two more enlisted men get their stripes, Cpl William H. Pfeffer who was promoted to Tec 3 per par 1, SO 186, Hq 279th Station Hospital, and Pfc Woodrow W. Crawford, who was promoted to Tec 5 per the same order.


7.         Captain Robert Ruder, DC, and Tec 5 John T. Lawless joined this unit on 24 August 1945. Captain Ruder joined from the 14th Reinforcement Depot per par 36, SO 233, Hq, 14th Reinforcement Depot, and Tec 5 Lawless came from the 217th General Hospital per par 2, SO 184, Hq 819th US Hospital Center. On 27 August 1945, Too 5 William J. Rasimowicz and Pvt Robert L. Oerton were assigned, and joined this organization from the 217th US General Hospital per par 2, SO 186, Hq 819th US Hospital Center. lst Lt. Joseph Schaluck, Jr., joined the unit on 31 August 1945, from the l669th Labor Supervision Company, per par I, SO 241, Hq Oise Intermediate Section Theater Service Fores, ET. On the same date, Pfc Gordon V. Ragan was appointed Too 4, per par 1, SO 188, Hq 279th Station Hospital.


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8.         On 2 September 1945, Tec 5 Charles A. Swanson was relieved from assignment and attached unassigned to the 19th Reinforcement Depot per par 49, SO 240, Hq Oise Intermediate Section TSFET. On the sane date, two 1st Lts, ANC, were assigned to this unit per par 26, SO 178, Eq 813th Hospital, Oise Intermediate Section Theater Service Forces, European Theater. 0n 8 September1945, eight officers and fifty enlisted men were put on temporary duty to the advance unit from this organization in Berlin, Germany (See Inclosure #2). lst Lt. Ann B. Ashley, ANC, was relieved from assignment and assigned to the 317th Station Hospital on 4 September per par 12, SO 191, Oise Intermediate Section, Theater Service Forces, lst Lts Alice Doule, Billie Nans, and Ramah I. Royal were relieved from assignment and assigned to the 50th General Hospital per par 7, SO 194, Hq 819th General Hospital, Oise Intermediate Section, Theater Service Forces. Pvt William Smith was assigned to this unit from the 62d Hospital per par 30, SO 244, Hq Oise Intermediate Section. On 5 September Captain Lester L. Evett, ChC, was assigned, and joined from the 59th General Hospital per VOCG Oise Intermediate Section, pending written orders. On the sane date, Pfc Francisco Rodriquez was relieved from assignment and attached unassigned to the 19th Reinforcement Depot per par 15, SO 241, Hq Oise Intermediate Section. Pvt Dewey I. Stepp was assigned this unit from the 75th Hospital Train per par 3, SO 206, Hq 21st General Hospital. On 7 September 1945, let Lts Clorisse C. Blacklock, Jessie C. Butler, and Evelyn G. Rand, ANC, were relieved from assignment and transferred to the 74th General Hospital per par 4, SO 196, Hq 819th Hospital, Oise Intermediate Section, Theater Service Forces. On that day, 1st Lt Harriet L. Gilman and 2d Lt Paula S. Vose were assigned and joined from the 19th General Hospital per par 18, SO 181, Hq 813th Hospital, Oise Intermediate Section, Theater Service Forces. 2d Lts Miriam L. Davis and Izetta L. Edwards were assigned and joined on 8 September 1945. They came from the 189th General Hospital per par 14, SO 182, Hq 813 Hospital, Oiso Intermediate Section, TSF. On the same order was 2d Lt Alioe N. Flanagan, All of these were ANC. 1st Lts Mamie S. Duma, Marjorie B. Fuller, and Jonike B. Henry, ANC, were relieved from assignment on 9 September 1945 per par 3, SO 198, Hq 819th Hospital, Oise Intermediate Section Theater Service Forces.


9.         On 9 September 1945, the unit left Maginot-Niel Medical Staging Camp, Verdun, France, by motor transport for new station. On 10 September the unit was still enroute to the now station, arriving at Berlin, Germany, on 11 September at 1400 hours. On 15 September 1945, S/Sgt Charles H. Vandenburg was relieved from assignment and attached unassigned to the 19th Reinforcement Depot per par 15, SO 251, Hq Oise Intermediate Section. 1st Lt Virginia B. Bender was assigned and joined from the 315th Station Hospital, 22 September 1945, per par 20, SO 242, Hq United Kingdom Base. On 25 September 1945, 1st Lt Virginia C. Cunningham was assigned and joined this unit from the 16th Station Hospital per par 21, SO 262, Hq, 7th Army Western Military District. Also 2d Lt Loretta L. Botto, Physical Therapist, was assigned and joined from the 202d General


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Hospital per par 2, SO 93, Hq St. Victoria Staging Area. 0n 28 September 1945 1st Lt Ruth I. Base, Physical Therapist, was relieved from assignment and assigned to the 68th General Hospital per par 8, SO 263, Hq US Forces European Theater (rear).


10.       CWO Johnaie F. Shelton of Pittsburg, Texas, was Personnel Officer, and M/Sgt Winston C. Harrell of White Oak, Georgia, was Personnel Sergeant-Major. The main accomplishment during this period, in excess of routine personnel duties, was the redeployment of personnel as they became eligible, and the requisitioning and receiving of replacements to insure sufficient qualified personnel being present to efficiently operate a Station Hospital.


11.       The most acute problem was the procuring of qualified personnel to replace those persons lost through redeployment. However, the criteria was not low enough during this period to cause a large amount of experienced personnel to leave.


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Inclosure #1    HQ, Northern District, Normandy Base Section, Communications Zone, European Theater of Operations, Movement Orders No. 5-51, 25 May 1945

 

Inclosure #2    HQ, Oise Intermediate Section, Theater Service Forces, European Theater, Movement Order (1219), 8 September 1945



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SECTION III



PLANS & TRAINING REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1.         During the period 8 May to 26 May 1945, no regular training program was in effect. Upon arrival at the Eagle Main Staging Area, Verdun, France, the majority of personnel with this unit received parallel training with other organizations in that area.


2.         Upon arrival in Berlin, all personnel was extremely active in the many duties incident to preparation of the hospital for the receipt of patients on 18 September 1945. During the remainder of the month, on-the-job training was not supplemented by any additional program.



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SECTION IV



TRANSPORTATION REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1.         For the period in question this hospital was operating under T/O and E 8-560, which authorized 15 vehicles and 24 enlisted men in the Motor Transportation Section. During the time the unit was engaged in parallel training at Verdun, the transportation was used for normal housekeeping duties and for training purposes to fit this organization for occupation duties.


2.         Upon arrival of the advance unit of this organization in Berlin, Germany, an MAC off jeer was assigned as Motor Transportation Officer. A portion of transportation accompanied the original group, the balance arriving shortly thereafter with the main group of hospital personnel. There were 18 motor vehicles at that time, 3 in excess of T/O and E.


3.         The hospital site had adequate shops and a large parking lot. The latter was covered with rubble which had been removed from bombed out buildings in the area and considerable clean-up work was necessary. Upon arrival, the vehicles had an approximate mileage of 20,000 miles each and were in need of many minor repairs and a few major repairs. Attempts were made toward repair of vehicles, but under great difficulty inasmuch as spare parts and tools were moat difficult to obtain. During the first week after arrival, the motor transportation section functioned primarily on housekeeping duties.


4.         On 18 September 1945, at which time the hospital was officially opened to the receipt of patients, the 5 assigned ambulances were used solely for transporting patients from the scene of accidents or other emergencies, and to and from other hospital plants in Berlin. Passenger transportation was used by personnel of this hospital for the transaction of official business. Cargo transportation was used for housekeeping duties such as hauling rations, unit and medical supplies, laundry, coal and coke, rubbish and ashes, and the hauling of materials for the great amount of construction which was necessary.


5.         A night dispatcher and regular driver were assigned for constant duty; additional night drivers were provided from a roster of regular drivers as required. A field autoclave was maintained and operated by men of the department for the sterilization of linen and clothing from contagious wards.


6.         Total number of miles driven during this period was 141,761. The accident rate for the same period was 2.82 per 100,000 miles.



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SECTION V


PROVOST MARSHAL REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1.         From 8 May 1945 to 18 September 1945 the activities of this department were of no special significance, but when the hospital was officially opened to receive patients, adequate guard posts were established and a schedule set up for the proper safeguarding of all buildings, equipment and government property, etc. All German Civilians were checked in and out of the hospital area and were inspected for concealed items of government property such as food, clothing, etc. Each civilian vehicle leaving the post was likewise inspected.


2.         Following is the Tour of Duty of the 279th Station Hospital guards for the period under consideration, 18 September 1945 to 30 September 1945:


a.         Post #1 -- Nurses Area. Tour will cover buildings 107, 106, 105, and 104; l04a is occupied by civilians. Guards will walk the front of the buildings and cut in between them so that the rear may be also checked. At no time will guards be engaged in conversation with civilians or other persons except in line of duty. Civilians on duty in Nurses Quarters will be checked by the guard at bldg 107 when reporting to and leaving work. Upon leaving, their bags will be inspected for food, articles of clothing, or any items that may be removed from the quarters. Old clothing may be taken out if the individual concerned has a slip signed by the nurse who has given the apparel to them. No loitering of GIs in front of quarters will be permitted at any time.


b.         Post #2 -- Main Gate #1. One guard will be on duty at Main Gate between 0700 hours and 1700 hours; from 1700 to 0700 hours there will be two guards. Guard at this gate will check all civilians entering the post to ascertain if they have proper identification. All civilians and civilian vehicles leaving the post will be checked for food, clothing or any other government property; there will be no exception to this rule. Passenger vehicles only will be permitted through this gate; trucks will be directed through east gate, which will be open between 0700 and 1700 hours. From 1700 to 0700 hours, it will be opened by guard at main gate where keys will be kept in guard house at that post. Between 2000 and 0800 hours one guard from each tour will b e designated Sgt of the Guard. In addition to his duties as guard at the main gate, he will ascertain that all guards are properly posted and relieved at the proper tine. He will spot check guards during his tour; during this period there will be two guards at the main gate. Visiting hours in th. hospital are from 1400 to 1600 hours; civilians will not be permitted to visit. No one will be allowed to enter the post after 1600 hours for other than official business. If any question arises during normal duty hours, the Sgt Major's Office should be contacted; in the same instance, the A & D office will be called after 1700 hours.


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c.         Post #3 -- Gate #2 (between Main Gate and Kamillenstrasse). Between hours of 0700 and 1700, this gate will remain open for the purpose of allowing trucks to enter and leave the post. All civilian trucks upon leaving the post will be searched for food, clothing, or other government property. 0n entering, trucks will be directed to rear of post and will not be permitted to park in parking area in front of headquarters building. This gate will be locked between 1700 and 0700 hours; keys will be kept in Main Gate guard house, and it may be opened if necessary by the Main Gate guard after 1700 hours.


d.         Post #4 -- Rear Guard. One guard will be posted in the hospital's Medical Supply area. The post will include the Medical Supply building, coal pile, and motor pool, and will be covered during off-duty hours by one guard per shift, who will circle the above area during his tour of duty.



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SECTION VI



RECEIVING & EVACUATION REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1.         During the period 8 May 1945 to 18 September 1945, the Receiving and Evacuation Section of this hospital remained inactive, On 18 September 1945 the R & E Section was established in the main hospital building; this included the Receiving Office, Dispensary and Out-Patient Clinic, and a small prophylactic station.


2.         For the period in question there were 382 Admissions, and 146 Dispositions. The Out-Patient Clinic handled 649 patients and gave 821 treatments. The clinics in different medical and surgical specialties served various units throughout the area.


3.         On 28 September 1945, the Surgeon, Berlin District, directed that all oases of suspected venereal disease be referred undiagnosed by other dispensaries direct to the 279th Station Hospital for hospitalization, diagnosis and treatment. This terminated the Dispensary treatment of Gonorrhea, and resulted in a marked increase of V.D. admissions to hospital.


4.         The Dispensary held daily sick call for the personnel of the 279th Station Hospital and that of the 15th Medical Depot. An additional function of the Dispensary was the immunization of personnel against communicable diseases. During this period, 388 typhus vaccinations were given. The number of emergency cases handled by the Dispensary was rather high, chiefly resulting from automobile accidents.


5.         Injuries of Allied Military Personnel were treated, and when necessary, patients in that category were admitted to hospital until such time as they could be safely transferred to their own hospitals. First aid and occasional emergency hospitalization was rendered to German Civilians.



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[16]

SECTION VII



UTILITIES REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1.         From 8 May 1945 to 1 August 1945 this department was inactive due to the operational situation. During August and September of the same year the department became extremely busy and Utilities personnel was increased to over 100 persons. In spite of this increase, the volume of work to be accomplished still overtaxed the facilities and capacity of this department. During this period requests were submitted for the general rehabilitation and reconstruction of the hospital plant to higher headquarters, and work was begun accordingly. Due to the shortage of Engineer personnel the brunt of administration and operational work fell on this section. All labor used on these projects was hired by the hospital rather than the Engineers, and reconstruction of some of the buildings was begun in August. The main kitchen was redecorated, cleaned, and the equipment placed in operating condition. The standing water tank was drained and cleaned of bodies and debris. The entire hospital area was rid of debris, trash, bodies and rubble insofar as possible.


2.         A telephone switchboard was installed, furnishing forty outside connections. In August, the hundred-dial PABX system was put into operation and all departments had telephone service prior to the official opening of the hospital. Civilian laborers were furnished to all sections from the Utilities labor pool to aid in setting up medical supply and professional departments.


3.         A total of more than 500 work orders were accomplished during September, varying from construction of signs to complete redecoration, plastering and tiling of the main kitchen in the headquarters building. Requisitions for buildings to be used as Nurses' and Officers' Quarters were submitted, and the Engineers were requested to make safety checks and repair of these buildings before occupancy. Minor repairs and cleaning was accomplished by men of this department. Routine repair and upkeep was maintained on p1umbing and electrical fixtures. Work was begun on repair of the laundry facilities, and boiler and steam installations were checked for safety. Plans were prepared and submitted to the Engineers for approval on installation of a chlorination plant and for the reconstruction of additional buildings.


4.         The entire plant located at 42-46 Unter den Eichen was requisitioned, including a total of more than 20 buildings with usable floor area of 350,000 sq ft and 22 acres of grounds. A total of 20,000 man-hours of work was done by Utilities personnel during this period; this figure does not include the work done by the Engineers. The following promises were requisitioned for Officers' billets:



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[17]

 6, Wildenowstrasse,

20, Wildenowstrasse,

32, Wildenowstrasse,

 7, Kamillenstrasse,

 8, Kamillenatrasse

 9, Kamillenatrasse,

10, Kamillenstrasse,

11, Kamillenstrasse,

12, Bastianstrasse,

 9, Malvenstrasse,

12, Malvenstrasse,

104, Unter den Eichen,

104a,Unter den Eichen,

105, Unter den Eichen,

l05a,Unter den Eichen,

106, Unter den Eichen,



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[18]

SECTION VIII



MEDICAL REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945



1. The major part of this time was spent at the Eagle Main Staging Area, Verdun, France, the unit having arrived there on 27 May 1945. Upon arrival there, many of both professional and enlisted personnel were put on detached service with other medical units. Those remaining at Verdun took part in such medical meetings and training programs as were available at that post.


2. On 18 September 1945, the 279th Station Hospital opened in Berlin, Germany. The remainder of the month was spent principally in organizing the service into its various sections and preparing the wards to receive patients.


3. On 28 September this unit was designated the V.D. Center for Berlin District.



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[19]

SECTION IX



SURGICAL REPORT


Period beginning 8 May 1945 to 30 September 1945


1. During the period 8 May l945 to 18 September 1945 the Surgical Service of this hospital was inactive. On 18 September 1945, when the hospital opened in Berlin, the Surgical Service had three (3) wards, two general surgery and one orthopedics. The operating room section was set up in the delivery rooms of the former German obstetrical department, due to the damage sustained by the German operating rooms. This setup was adequate and full use was made of German equipment and personnel.


2. The Service followed the ten day policy of the hospital and admitted only minor cases. The average census, therefore, was 40-50 patients in the Service at any one time.


3. Rapid turnover of personnel, a small staff arid light Service prevented regular staff meetings. Ward rounds were made frequently by the entire staff. Procedures were conservative, following theater directives. There appeared no need for improvisation or new methods.



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