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Preface

Contents

PREFACE

In accordance with the plan adopted originally, of having separate volumes on special subjects, the major activities of the Medical Department in connection with mobilization camps are considered in other volumes of this history. Thus, in Volume III appear data pertaining to the medical supply of camps, and in Volume V, data concerning military hospitals; in Volume VI, all subjects collectively designated sanitation, but covering in detail the matters of housing, clothing, and feeding troops, physically examining them and protecting them from infectious and other disease conditions; in Volume VII, the training of

Medical Department troops, not only in the Medical Department training camps, but also in divisional mobilization camps. From this it would seem at first glance that the subject of Medical Department activities concerning mobilization camps has been covered adequately. The above method of treatment, however, leaves untouched a number of details which go to make up a large part of the first chapter. Succeeding chapters deal specifically with, first, the National Army cantonments and National Guard camps, and then the two great embarkation ports-the port, of Hoboken, N. J., and the port of

Newport News, Va.

In connection with the embarkation ports, it is necessary to explain that, whereas the Medical Department activities relating to these ports, as recorded herein, pertained to both the embarkation of troops for overseas and their debarkation when they returned to the United States, since no official change in the designation of these ports was made when their major function changed from the embarkation to the debarkation of troops, this fact does not appear except in the body of the text. Ordinarily, the history of one of these ports would suffice for historical purposes, but, though in theory their problems

were very much the same, their experiences were so divergent as to warrant full treatment of the activities of each, with this exception: Since the activities of embarkation and debarkation hospitals are recorded in Volume V, their detailed consideration does not form a part of this volume.

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