U.S. Army Medical Department, Office of Medical History
Skip Navigation, go to content

HISTORY OF THE OFFICE OF MEDICAL HISTORY

AMEDD BIOGRAPHIES

AMEDD CORPS HISTORY

BOOKS AND DOCUMENTS

HISTORICAL ART WORK & IMAGES

MEDICAL MEMOIRS

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENTS External Link, Opens in New Window

ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORIES

THE SURGEONS GENERAL

ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE SURGEON GENERAL

AMEDD UNIT PATCHES AND LINEAGE

THE AMEDD HISTORIAN NEWSLETTER

Chapter XLI

Books and Documents > Medical Department of the U.S. Army in the World War, Volume III, Finance & Supply

CHAPTER XLI

MOTOR AMBULANCE SUPPLY DEPOT, LOUISVILLE, KY.

In the procurement of motor ambulances it proved necessary to purchase the chassis from one manufacturer and the bodies from another. Before the vehicle was ready for use the body had to be mounted on the chassis and the machine tuned up and made ready for immediate use. The chassis were to be manufactured at Pontiac, Mich., and the bodies at Watertown, N. Y. The finished ambulances were required in all parts of the United States. Therefore, it was desirable that the place selected for the assembly of these vehicles be located centrally and have ample railroad facilities for distribution. Louisville, Ky., possessed these qualifications. It had the additional advantage of a large quartermaster depot just across the Ohio River at Jeffersonville, Ind. It was at first contemplated establishing this assembling point at the Jeffersonville quartermaster depot. An investigation showed that the area within the compound of that depot was too small to provide for motor ambulance assembly. It was necessary, therefore, to look elsewhere for space and facilities.

A very advantageous offer was submitted by the Kentucky Wagon Co., of Louisville, Ky., for the lease of a part of their plant.1 The fact that this company was a builder of both animal-drawn and motor vehicles and had trained crews in both sections of its plant was a factor which strongly recommended the selection of this plant for the motor ambulance depot.2

The offer was investigated and accepted.2 A building was turned over, renovated, and converted into offices and warehouses for spare parts stock. Another building, with loading platform and electric hoist, was erected for the work of mounting the bodies on the chassis and the inspection and tuning of engines. A second building was later erected for spare parts bin stock. There was also space for the storage, in the open immediately in the rear of this second building and within the factory compound, of a number of assembled ambulances.2 Since there was considerable expense involved in the construction and modification of buildings, some time was consumed in the negotiations. It was necessary to absorb this expense in the rental. Satisfactory agreement having been reached, the lease was consummated and construction began June 16, 1917. Officers were in readiness and the office force was organized by June 27.2

In July, 1918, the major part of the Ford Building in Louisville was leased for the use of this depot.3 It was intended primarily for the development of a motor ambulance mechanics’ school for the training of motor mechanics. Such mechanics were badly needed by all motorized ambulance companies. The delay in the establishment of such a school was a serious


698

handicap in the handling of ambulance repairs in camps and overseas. More pressing work on body designs and production of both bodies and chassis had served for a time to relegate to the background the training of mechanics.

PERSONNEL

COMMISSIONED

When this depot was established in June, 1917, only one officer of the Medical Department, a captain in the Medical Corps, was assigned to it. After the Sanitary Corps was authorized, technical experts were commissioned in that corps and assigned to the depot as the needs required. At the height of its activities, in August and September, 1918, the commissioned force of the depot and its adjunct, the Medical Department motor mechanics’ school numbered seven, one lieutenant colonel, Medical Corps, in command, with six officers of the Sanitary Corps as assistants.4 Another officer of the Medical Corps was assigned to the school as its surgeon. A few changes in the composition of the depot personnel occurred after the functions of the depot and school were absorbed by the Motor Transport Corps in September, 1918, under the provisions of General Orders, No. 75, War Department, August 15, 1918. The commissioned personnel who remained on duty after the change had been effected were attached to the Motor Transport Corps, but retained their places and designations in the Sanitary Corps.5

ENLISTED

The first enlisted man reported for duty at the depot in August, 1917.̊ Men with qualifications especially suitable for the various duties required were carefully selected and enlisted or inducted into the service at the depot.7 Additional men were transferred from Camp Taylor, Ky., and other stations to this depot when occassion required. All members of the detachment were given training in their military as well as technical duties. As they became proficient and showed the proper qualities, they were promoted to appropriate noncommissioned grades. As they qualified, some of the noncommissioned officers were transferred to other stations for duty.8
 
By the time the mechanics’ school was started in August, 1918, the number of enlisted personnel in the permanent detachment of the depot and school had reached 45.4 With the opening of the school 60 students were added and, for administrative purposes, became a part of the detachment, being so reported.9 Thereafter, until the end of November, 1918, the aggregate strength of the detachment varied between 103 and 120. After the transfer of the functions of the depot and school to the Motor Transport Corps these men were temporarily attached to that corps for duty but remained and were reported as Medical Department personnel. After November the strength of the detachment rapidly declined by transfer and discharge until it finally ceased to exist about the middle of April 1919.9

Prior to the lease of the Ford Building in July, 1918, the members of this detachment were on a commutation status. With the increase in the strength of the detachment it became increasingly difficult to find boarding places for


699

them within a reasonable distance of the depot where board and lodging could be had for the commutation allowances. After the lease of the Ford Building for school purposes, the fourth floor was converted into barracks for the detachnment. These barracks were occupied during the school period and for a short time thereafter. Mess was started July 31, 1918.4

It was intended that this depot should be not only an assembly point and an issuing depot for ambulances, motor cycles, and spare parts, but a repair shop as well where major repairs would be made; consequently the personnel of the detachment were selected with that in view. As new classes of repair work were started, men were selected from the detachment for that work and were given special courses of instruction, both in the shop and in the shops of representative large firms in the city doing that class of work.4 After the initial issue of ambulances and motor cycles, the repair work on such vehicles as were turned in for repairs gradually increased. The large vulcanizing plant in the Ford Building was adapted to the standard ambulance tires, and unserviceable tires and tubes were turned in to the depot by various organizations for salvage or repair.10 This work was done by members of the detachment.

In June, 1918, field service and roadside instruction was started. The detachment was divided into two groups which were taken out alternately. Practical instruction was given in making and breaking camp, camp sanitation, personal hygiene, cooking of rations in individual mess kits, etc. Regular military drills and instruction were also conscientiously carried out.4 After the school was started two road companies were organized out of the students and trained accordingly.4

CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES

The plans for this depot contemplated that the work of the unloading of chassis and bodies from freight cars, the mounting of the body upon the chassis, and the loading and blocking of the completed ambulance on freight cars preliminary to shipment, would be done by the Kentucky Wagon Manufacturing Co. under contract. But there would still be need for watchmen, a chauffeur, a packer for spare parts, an inspector of ambulances, and such number of laborers as might be required. Authority for the employment of these persons was granted June 28, 1917.11 The employment of clerks and stenographers was authorized, from time to time, as increase in the work of the depot made this necessary. Some delay was experienced in securing the requisite personnel, due both to rates of pay offered and to the failure of the United States Civil Service Commission to have on the roster of eligibles in that district persons having the special qualifications desired. These difficulties eventually were overcome. Men with the qualifications desired were given temporary employment pending their taking special examinations and certification by the local district secretary of the Civil Service Commission.12

The location of the depot within the compound of the Kentucky Wagon Manufacturing Co. was fortunate. That company built both animal-drawn and motor vehicles. It numbered among its employees expert body builders and motor mechanics. It appeared to be more ad.vantageous to the Government to have the assembly of motor ambulances and their preliminary testing done


700

by this company under contract than for the depot to develop its own crew of experts for this purpose. The Kentucky Wagon Co. was willing to undertake the assembly and testing of motor ambulances. A contract was entered into whereby that company unloaded the chassis and bodies from the freight cars on which shipped, mounted the body on the chassis, gave the assembled job a test for efficiency, and loaded the finished jobs on freight cars for shipment, all for the sum of $20 per completed ambulance.13 This contract remained in force so long as ambulances continued to be assembled at this depot. The last payment thereunder was made September 27, 1918.13

FINANCE DEPARTMENT

The remaining activities of the depot were not numerous or complex. The officer in charge was made a disbursing officer in September, 1917.14 Disbursements continued to be made by him until his relief from duty at the end of September, 1918.15 The funds then remaining to his credit were deposited in the Treasury to the credit of the proper appropriation and disbursements at the depot thereupon ceased. A finance department was necessary, therefore, and was organized shortly after funds were placed to the credit of the disbursing officer.16 The usual papers required by regulations were prepared and the customary records kept.

PURCHASING AND MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENTS

The depot was early designated to procure spare parts and accessories for both ambulances and motor cycles.17 A purchasing department was organized in August, 1917. The other departments were, ambulance assembly, spare parts assembly, receiving, shipping, warehouse records, property returns, experimental, and repair. Only a small force was employed in each department. The organization was sufficiently flexible to permit one department to assist another in time of stress. The organization was small and the officer commanding the depot had opportunity to supervise all departments.

The routine of handling requisitions in force in other depots and as prescribed in regulations was observed at this depot. As the requisitions came in, they were stamped with date of receipt, given a serial miumber, were recorded, and placed in the pending file. As the supplies called for on the requisition became available for distribution, they were prepared for shipment, invoiced, the proper shipping papers prepared, and the shipment was delivered to the carrier. The original of the invoice was sent to the Surgeon General. The duplicate invoice, together with duplicate receipts, was sent to the consignee. The articles in the shipment were posted on the standard form of return, M. D. Forms 17a and 17b. The return was rendered at the periods prescribed by the Surgeon General.

Routine correspondence was kept in vertical filing cases 18 with card indices and filed in accordance with the duodecimal system prescribed by the War Department.19

A record was kept of the number and date of receipt of each motor chassis and ambulance body, of the chassis and body numbers of each assembled ambulance, of dates of shipment and freight cars (numbers and initials) on


701

which shipped, the spare parts equipment sent with each anìbulance, dates of testing of chassis and name of inspector, and such other information as experience and judgment indicated.19

FORD AMBULANCES

The first receipt of Ford ambulances, 100 of which had been ordered near the end of June, arrived at Louisville July 19, 1917. There were 50 ambulances in the shipment. The bodies were knocked down and shipped 2 in a crate; the chassis likewise, were shipped 2 in a crate.20 The remaining 50 ambulances were received later in the month.21 With the arrival of these Ford ambulances the real work of the depot began. Instructions received froni the Surgeon General directed the shipment of 18 of them to newly organized Engineer regiments, 2 per regiment.22 These 18 ambulances were reshipped to the designated regiments in original crates as they came from the factory. Shipments of unassembled ambulances were also made to some aviation stations.23 Considerable difficulty was experienced by the organizations to which the anibulances had been shipped in assembling the bodies, due to incorrectly placed holes for bolts and screws in the various parts of the body, and in starting the motors which, apparently, had never been turned over.21 For this reason the remaining ambulances were assembled at the depot and tested out before shipment, for it was desired that they be ready for use immediately upon arrival at their destination.24 By the middle of August, 47 of the Ford ambulances had been issued, 21 had been completely assembled and tested, and 32 were in original packages.25 Thereafter they were distributed slowly, the last one being issued February 19, 1918.26

Another purchase of 100 Ford ambulances arrived in Louisville May 24, 1918. The assembly and delivery of these ambulances were handled by the Louisville branch of the Ford Motor Co.27 It had been decided to extend the wheel base of the chassis of these ambulances by means of the Hay Dee extension device. This device was purchased by the depot and was attached to the chassis at the local Ford branch by personnel from the depot before the body was mounted upon it.28 Difficulties, similar to those encountered on the lot assembled at the depot during the previous year, were experienced by the local branch of the Ford Co. in assembling this lot of ambulance bodies. These difficulties were eventually overcome and the machines completely assembled, were delivered to the depot. Some difficulties were experienced, too, in attaching and adjusting the Hay Dee extensions.b  These were overcome in a satisfactory manner. Complete sets of Ford spare parts A were issued with each Ford ambulance. During June, 1918, 94 of these ambulances were received at the depot and 85 were issued. During July, 6 were received, completing the order, and 15 were issued, completing the distribution.29

G. M. C. AMBULANCES

The General Motors Truck Co. was instructed by wire August 16, 1917, to begin shipping chassis at the rate of 5 carloads per day.30 Chassis began to arrive at the depot August 27,31and came in rapidly thereafter. Bodies began to arrive August 17,32 and continued to come in rapidly. Many minor
______________________________________________________
bA more extended account of this extension will be found in Chap. XXIII.


702

difficulties were encountered in mounting the bodies on the chassis, but these were rapidly overcome.33 One of the most aggravating causes of delay was the manner of shipping the chassis. They arrived on flat cars, two chassis per car, but stripped of all readily removable parts. These parts were packed in boxes, one box for each chassis, and shipped separately in box cars. Failure to receive them prevented the shipment of the ambulance having the chassis to which they belonged.34 Some minor defects were found in the motors, which were early discovered, but necessitated a very careful inspection of the completed vehicle before blocking it on the car for shipment.35 All vehicles were tested out under their own power and demonstrated to be in perfect running order before they were shipped. After this test the following card, properly filled out and inclosed in a manila envelope, was attached to the steering wheel of the ambulance. No ambulances were shipped without the card and no card was attached without the requisite test.36

MOTOR AMBULANCE SUPPLY DEPOT, UNITED STATES ARMY, LOUISVILLE, Ky.

[Shipping card]

Another tag was devised for the more systematic assembly and inspection of ambulances. This tag was attached to the chassis as soon as it came on the floor for assembling and remained with it until the test card, mentioned above, was attached, the last thing before shipment. This assembly tag was divided into three sections: Chassis operations, body operation, and shipping. On the first section was entered the chassis number, the body number, and the name or initial of the employee attaching the toe board filler, blocks in the channel of frame at points of attachment of U bolts, head lamps, side lamps, tail lamps, and Prest-o-Lite tank. On the second section--body operations--were entered the names or initials or clock numbers of the employees performing the following operations: Setting U bolts; attaching fenders, tire carriers, tail gate, horn, and curtains; cleaning gas tank; oil inspection; filling with oil (if necessary), gas, air, and water; test, and date. The third section--shipping--received the following entries; Car initial, car number, whether box car or flat car; water drained from cooling system, gas drained, tires inflated; name of


703

employee by whom the body was stripped, hoods sealed, tank box wired, and tools checked; date. This tag served to fix the responsibility whenever any defect or maladjustment was found on final test, and as the basis for the elimination of careless employees from the work.37

This methodical procedure and the careful inspections made at the depot disclosed many defects in the earlier shipments, due probably to carelessness in assembly, lack of careful inspection at the factory, and haste in shipment. These defects covered a wide range--broken headlight lenses, defective clutches and transmissions, broken springs, faulty carburetors, leaking pumps, defective oil indicators, loose gasoline lines, gasoline lines not plugged to prevent being filled with dirt, and defective blocking on the cars.38 After the Medical Department personnel assigned to duty at the factory had organized and begun inspections there, these defects rapidly diminished and soon ceased entirely.39

After the issue of G. M. C. motor ambulances to all organizations in the United States entitled to them had been completed, it was contemplated, for a time, to utilize the assembly room at the depot for the storage of boxes, chassis, and bodies. While it was intended to ship chassis and bodies overseas as rapidly as tonnage could be had for them, it was anticipated that deliveries would exceed this rate. Temporary storage for this surplus was necessary. A contract was entered into February 11, 1918, with the Kentucky Wagon Manufacturing Co.40to unload chassis and bodies from the cars, place them in storage, and reload them on cars for shipment at a fixed price per unit (1 chassis and 1 body). The plan for stowing the chassis and bodies in tiers was developed by the depot personnel.41 By the time the production of chassis had reached a point where storage became necessary the situation in the combat zone called for all the ambulances which could be supplied. Only 84 chassis and a like number of bodies were sent to the depot for storage.42

SPARE PARTS TRAILER

Work on the development of a suitable spare parts trailer was undertaken at the depot in January, 19l8.43A satisfactory design had been worked out by the end of March. Contracts for trailer chassis and the special bodies were signed April 17 and April 13, 1918, respectively.44 Deliveries and issues of these trailers are included in the table of receipts and issues of ambulances given above.

It was contemplated that both the ambulance spare parts set B and the motor cycle repair parts set B would be packed in the trailer at the depot and the whole shipped as a complete unit to the organization to which consigned. This was especially desirable in securing uniformity in equipment and methods of carrying it. It was advantageous to have exactly the same equipment and methods at home and abroad. The trailer was considered the best sort of carrier and container under all circumstances. Future operations would be facilitated by having the equipment complete, uniform, and standard.45

Because of the large number of parts carried in the spare parts trailer and the number of compartments in which they were packed, it was foreseen that it would be difficult for the mechanic to know what parts were in the trailer


704

and where they were carried. To simplify the finding of the parts needed, a simple index was devised. This index consisted of two printed sheets of parts covered with sheets of pyralin and carried in metal frames, 10 inches by 14 inches, attached to the rear door of the trailer. The parts were arranged by divisions and each division carried together in a separate compartment so far as sizes of the parts would permit. Tools and accessories were assembled in groups in the manner in which they would be used--hammers, punches, and chisels in one bin, wrenches in another, drills and brace bits in another, and tire repairing materials in still another. The index was arranged with this distribution of parts in view. All factory parts were grouped on the index in accordance with their numbers. These numbers consisted of two series separated by a hyphen, thus: Knuckle arm nuts, 13-278. When the mechanic desired to find this nut he would look at the index, run down the list of 13’s until he canie to the 278. Opposite this number would be the number of the compartment and bin in which the part was carried.46 This index proved most convenient. The dates of distribution of these trailers are shown below.

DISTRIBUTION

The depot distributed assembled motor ambulances, motor cycles, and spare parts to all organizations within the continental limits of the United States. It received and stored a number of boxed chassis and knocked-down bodies and later put them in transits to ports of embarkation for shipment overseas. Spare-parts trailers were distributed to camps at home and forwarded overseas for distribution to organizations which had left without them.

Distribution of standing or completely assembled ambulances began August 28, 1917, with shipment of two machines to the base hospital at each National Army and National Guard training camp. This distribution was completed September 7, 1917. Distribution of motor ambulances to ambulance companies of the Regular Army not already equipped began September 11, 1917, and was completed September 15, 1917--five companies.47 Distribution of ambulances for the equipment of one motor ambulance company at each of the National Army cantonments began September 10 and was completed except for spare-parts cars October 26. Distribution of ambulances for one motorized ambulance company at National Guard camps began September 24 and was completed October 30. Camp Mills, Garden City, Long Island, N.Y., not one of the original 16 National Guard Camps, was equipped November 8. Distribution of ambulances for the second motorized company at all divisional training camps began October 30, 1917, and was completed March 27, l918.47

There was material delay in securing spare parts for distribution. The sets of spare parts were finally assembled and distribution began early in April, 1918. All camps had been supplied by the end of June of that year. Spare-parts trailers were distributed to the several camps in June and July, 1918. One spare-parts trailer, 1 set of moter ambulance spare parts B, and 12 sets nioter ambulance spare parts A were issued to every camp for each motorized ambulance company equipped with motor ambulances. One set of ambulance


705

spare parts A was issued for each General Motors Co. ambulance sent to stations and not part of an ambulance company. One set of motor cycle spare parts B was also issued to each ambulance company at home and abroad.47 Some delay was experienced in the issue of motor cycle spare parts due to the slowness of the manufacturers in making deliveries.

Receipts and issues of standard ambulances, spare-parts cars, spare-parts trailers, and sets of ambulance spare parts A and B are given, by months, in the following tabular statement:48

Ambulances and parts

MECHANICS’ SCHOOL

As stated previously, the need for a school for the training of ambulance chauffeurs and mechanics made itself known at an early date. The actual work on the development of such a school was delayed by that necessary to the development of organizations at the producing plants and to body design. It was at first contemplated that such a school would be developed at the Louisville depot. A central shop for the repair of motor ambulances and motor cycles appeared to be necessary. It was believed that this repair shop might very profitably be run in conjunction with such a training school and the ambulance supply depot.19 The policies of the War Department, however,


706

limited the number of places at which special training could be given and required the establishment at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., of the school for the training of ambulance chauffeurs.

Authority was granted June 27, 1918, for the establishment of the school for mechanics at Louisville. This authority covered also the lease of the major part of the Ford Building in that city.49 Lease was effected July 19, 1918.50 This building was converted so as to provide comfortable barracks on the fourth floor, spare-parts stock on the third floor, school on the second floor, and offices, utilities, and receiving and shipping departments on the first floor.

The purpose of the school, its equipment and facilities are given in the following extract from a letter from the officer in charge:51

The Medical Department Mechanics’ School is arranged to furnish two distinct courses of instruction, (a)the inside instruction including shopwork, and (b)the road course. For the purpose of the inside instruction we have, at present, laid out on the third floor of the Ford Building.
3 complete model 16 G.M.C. chassis;
1 frame complete with springs;
3 motors complete;
3 clutch and transmission assemblies, complete;
3 rear axles, complete;
3 front axles, complete;
3 universal drive shafts, complete;
3 steering gears, complete;
3 water pump assemblies, complete;
3 radiatiors;
3 magnetos; and
2 complete Indian motor cycles with side cars.

This material is mounted on horses or blocks for ready disassembly and assembly. All disassembly and assembly work is done with the tool equipment carried in two spare-parts trailers equipped with complete sets of spare parts B, which are installed on this floor. For the contents of the spare-parts trailer, including its tool equipment, attention is invited to the pamphlet of information and instructions published in the Office of the Surgeon General under date of May 1, 1918.

On the second floor of the Ford Building which is intended to be used as an overhauling shop for ambulances sent in from time to time from the different camps, is located a tire repair shop equipped with an Akron-Williams steam vulcanizing outfit for which material has been ordered to remodel it to take care of 35 by 5 tires; a radiator repair shop with furnaces, test tank, and compressed air; a blacksmith’s forge and anvil; 2 arbor presses; 1 drill press; lathe; 1 universal grinder, and 1 dry grinder. In addition to this there are some special Ford equipments, including an electrically driven machine for running in motor bearings and another electrically driven machine for testing rear axles.

This second floor is also equipped with a lecture room, provided with blackboards, seating 150 men, and is at present supplied with a cut-out motor-cycle motor, a cut-out motorcycle transmission, a cut-out motor-cycle clutch, a cut-out carburetor and governor for ambulance, and a cut-out Pyrene fire extinguisher. This material will be added to from time to time.

For road training it is intended to equip motorized ambulance companies complete, and for this purpose we now have on hand 24 standard model 16, G. M. C. ¾-ton ambulances, 6 motor cycles, and 2 spare-parts trailers, and it is our understanding that shipment has been made, by the various general depots of the Quartermaster Corps, of 6 class A trucks, 2 Dodge touring cars, 2 trailmobile-type rolling kitchens, and 2 trailmobile-type water carts. We also have on hand the complete medical, quartermaster, and ordnance equipment for two ambulance companies which will be carried on this transportation, per paragraph 874, Manual for the Medical Department, 1916.


707

The fourth floor of the Ford Building is used as a barracks, in which are now housed 52 men attached to the motor ambulance supply depot. The capacity of the main squad room in this barracks is 110 men. The mess room will seat 150 men at one time. The kitchen arrangements are ample for a mess for 500 men.

The school detachment consisted of 8 officers, including the commanding officer, 10 noncommissioned officers, 3 cooks, and a small number of privates, first class.52 This personnel was grouped into administrative, detachment commander, and instructors, commissioned and enlisted.53

The first class comprised 60 men selected from among those who had taken the chauffeurs’ course at Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. They were given practical work in finding trouble in the motors and in making roadside repairs. Some 40 members of the class qualified as mechanics, of whom 6 were proficient motor-cycle mechanics.54

The school was discontinued at the end of December, 1918. All Medical Department equipment was transferred to the medical supply depot, St. Louis, Mo. The building was released to the Ford Motor Co. in January, 1919.55

REFERENCES

(1) Letter from Col. H. C. Fisher, M. C., S. G. O., to Mr. Robert V. Board, President, Kentucky Wagon Manufacturing Co., Louisville, Ky., May 23, 1917.  Subject: Motor ambulance supply depot. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 11,220-247.
(2) Correspondence between Maj. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., and Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., motor ambulance supply depot, Louisville, Ky., during June and July, 1917, relative establishment of Motor Ambulance Supply Depot. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/1.
(3) Correspondence between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., and Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., during July, 1918, relative to establishment of motor ambulance mechanics’ training school. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/337.
(4) Weekly report of the Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., for the period ending July 31, 1918, to the Surgeon General. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/398.  
(5) Correspondence between the Surgeon General and The Adjutant General, U. S. Army, during August and September, 1918. Subject: Motor Transport Corps. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O. , 750-751  M. T. C./1.
(6)  Return of enlisted personnel, Medical Department, August, 1917. On file, Enlisted Section, Personnel Division, S. G. O.
(7) Correspondence between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., and Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., during July to December 1917. On file Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/(various numbers).
8) Weekly reports of the Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, April to August, 1918, to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/398.
(9) Return of enlisted personnel, Medical Department, August, 1917, to April, 1919, inclusive. On file, Enlisted Section, Personnel Division, S. G. O.


708

(10) Par. 4 (a). 4, Supply Letters, Nos. 1 to 23, inclusive (consolidated and revised), Medical Department, U. S. Army, Surgeon General’s Office, December 5, 1917.
(11) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Officer in Charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., June 28, 1917. Subject: Civilian employees.  On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 182,301-A-1..
12) Letters from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., July 2, July 19, and August 17, 1917, relative to civilian employees and other depot matters. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G.  O., 713-440 /1.
(13) Contract between Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., representing the United States, and the Kentucky Wagon Co., July 17, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport files, Contract No. 613.
(14) Letters from Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., August 31, 1917, to Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky. Subject: Depot affairs. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440./23.
(15) First indorsement of the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, to the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., September 24, 1918. Subject: Commissoned personnel. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440./388.
(16) Letters from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., August 27 and 30, 1917.  Subject: Depot affairs. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/23, 58.
(17) Letter from Maj. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., to Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., July 25, 1917. Subject: Ford ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 14,842-1.
(18) Letter from Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Maj. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., July 2, 1917. Subject.:  Correspondence filing system. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/1.
(19) Correspondence between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot,  Louisville, Ky., and Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O.,  August, 1917, to December 31, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/1 to 133.
(20) Telegram from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, July 19, 1917. Subject: Ford ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 14,842.-L.-1.
(21) Letter from Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Maj. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., July 31, 1917. Subject: Depot matters. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440 /1.
(22) Letter from the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, to the Chief of Engineers, July 21, 1917. Subject: Motor ambulance for Engineer regiments. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 15,573.-G-1.
(23) Letter from the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, to the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., July 16, 1917. Subject: Motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 14,842.-R.
(24) Letter from Maj. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., to Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., August 4, 1917. Subject:  Motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/1.
(25) Letter from Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to  Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., August 21, 1917. Subject: Motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/23.


709

(26) Louisville weekly reports for the week ending February 23, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/398.
(27) Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., May 30, 1918. Subject: Spare parts and Ford ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440./340.
(28)  Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., June 20, 1918. Subject:  Motor ambulances and spare parts. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/351.
(29) Louisville weekly reports, June 8, 1918, to July 20, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/398.
(30) Telegram from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., August 16, 1917.  Subject: Shipment of chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,713-440./13.
(31) Letter from Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Suppy Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., August 27, 1917. Subject: Labor difficulties. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/23.
(32) Letter from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to the H. H. Babcock Co., Watertown N. Y., August 18, 1917. Subject: Ambulance bodies.On File, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/23.
(33) Letter from Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G.O., August 30, 1917. Subject: Ambulance assembly. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/58.
(34) Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., September 5, 1917.  Subject: Shipments of G. M. C. chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/47.
(35) Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Lieut. Co]. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. 0., September 4, 1917. Subject, Motor ambulance chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/46.
(36) Letter from Capt. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Maj. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., August 16, 1917. Subject:Ambulance assembly. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/13.
(37) Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. 0., September 20, 1917. Subject:  Depot affairs.  On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/105.
(38) Letter from officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to the General Motor Truck Co. Pontiac, Mich., September 20, 1917. Subject: Defective chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/105.
(39) Letter from Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., to Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., October22, 1917. Subject: Spare parts and ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/22.


710

(40) Contract between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., and the Kentucky Wagon Manufacturing Co., February 11, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Contracts, No. 3985.
(41) Correspondence between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., and Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., during December, 1917, and January, 1918, relative to storing ambulances and other depot matters. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/133.
(42) Louisville weekly reports, February, 1918, to June, 1918, inclusive. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/164.
(43) Letter from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, San. Corps, S. G. O., January 16, 1918. Subject: Spare parts. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/164.
(44) Contract between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., and the Trailmobile Co., of Cincinnati Ohio, April 17, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Contracts, No. 4669.
(45) Letter from Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, San. Corps, N. A., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., March 22, 1918. Subject: Spare parts “B” equipment, body and trailer chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-714/284.
(46) Letter from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisv ille, Ky., to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, San. Corps, N. A., April 26, 1918. Subject: Index of spare parts. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/290.
(47) Louisville weekly reports of Motor Ambulances received and Issued. On file, Financeand Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/398.
(48) Compiled from the following reports on file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.: Louisville weekly reports, August, 1917, to September 30, 1918, file number713-440/398, Louisville  daily shop report, September 28, 1917 to October 22, 1918  file number   713-440/399, 401,  and Louisville daily spare parts report, July 6, 1918, to October 22, 1918, file number,  713-440/402. 
(49) Letter from Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., to Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., February 26, 1918. Subject:Training school for mechanics. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/195.
(50) Memorandum from Director of Purchases and Supplies, to Chief of Staff, Director of Operations, Jumse 27, 1918. Subject: Lease of building owned by Ford Motor Co., Louisville, Ky.; and the indorsement of the third Assistant Secretary of War thereon.  On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-714/564.
(51) Letter from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to the Quartermaster General, attention, “Burnett,” August 20, 1918. Subject: School equipment. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/382.
(52) Letter from the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, to The Adjutant General of the Army, August 30, 1918. Subject: Motor Transport Corps. On file, Record Room, S. G. O.


711

(53)  Letter from the Surgeon General’s Office to Lieut. Col. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., July 18, 1918. Subject: Organization and personnel. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/347.
(54) Letter from Lieut. Col. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Medical Department Mechanics’ School, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., September 24, 1918. Subject: Progress of school. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-440/395.
(55)  Letter from the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, to the Director of Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division, January 10, 1918. Subject: Discontinuance of mechanics’ school. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 440 (Louisville, Ky.) F.