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Chapter XXVII

Books and Documents > Medical Department of the U.S. Army in the World War, Volume III, Finance & Supply

CHAPTER XXVII

OVERSEAS SHIPMENTS

It was early manifest that if equipment were to be shipped to the American Expeditionary Forces in quantities commensurate with the needs, it must be condensed into the smallest possible bulk, even at the expense of more extensive assembly at ports of debarkation. It was also evident, for the same reason, that shipments of building material for shops and warehouses would be very limited. Reports indicated a dearth of all kinds of building material in France. These considerations led the Medical Department to the decision to ship all standard ambulances, both chassis and bodies, in tight boxes of average lumber. The size of the boxes in which the chassis were shipped was 186 inches long, 71 inches broad, and 32 inches high. They contained more than 255 board feet of lumber, most of which, it was believed, would be in a serviceable condition when the chassis were uncrated at their destination. This plan offered a means of transporting to France a considerable quantity of lumber which could be readily salvaged and used for building purposes. A motor ambulance assembly unit, which was organized and sent to France, within a short time after its arrival in France did erect its own assembly shops, using this material for the purpose.1

In boxing the chassis the wheels, steering column, dashboard, radiator, and a few other parts were removed from the frame and secured within the box.ª Many of the chassis boxed earlier lay out in the open, in storage, at ports of embarkation awaiting tonnage space, or at ports of debarkation awaiting assembly, where they were subjected to all kinds of weather conditions. It was but natural that complaints of rusted parts should arise when they were unpacked for assembling. A report from the commanding officer of the motor ambulance assembly unit in France, received early in February, 1918, after 90 machines had been assembled, indicated that the General Motors Co. chassis were in very bad condition from rust and breakage. The boxes and machines showed evidences of rough usage in transit. Broken compression plugs, drain cocks, and radiator goosenecks were of common occurence. Frozen clutches were numerous, due to rusting of the splines and plates. These clutches were very difficult to loosen without dismantling and cleaning plates and splines. It was recommended in this report that greater care be taken in packing, that all parts be so firmly secured that they could not become loose in transit, and that a heavy oil be applied to all moving parts to keep them from rusting.1

Several months had elapsed between the boxing of these chassis for shipment and the uncrating of them for assembly. During that interval most of
_______________
See Figure 16


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the defects reported, if not all of them, had been noted by the Medical Department representative at the General Motors Truck Co. plant. Measures had been taken to correct them and to produce a boxed chassis that would withstand even unreasonably rough usage in shipment. A copy of the report on defects found in General Motors Co. ambulances mentioned in the preceding paragraph was furnished the inspector at the General Motors Truck Co. plant February 6, 1918,2 with instructions to take extra precautions and insure additional strength in boxing.3 Subsequent shipments appear to have arrived in good condition.

That ambulances should arrive in France in as perfect condition as could be effected was one of the determining factors in arriving at the decision to ship them knocked down and boxed for export. Standing ambulances which had been in service for training purposes in the several camps during the winter of 1917-18 had seen hard usage and were in poor mechanical condition. To ship them overseas would not only require more shipping space but also a complete overhaul and repair before shipment and would leave the camps short of ambulance transportation. The winter had been severe, a majority of the machines had been without shelter, and the drivers had been inexperienced. It was decided, therefore, to leave them in the camps for the training of subsequent organizations and to provide new ambulances for all divisions on their arrival overseas.4 The earlier policy had contemplated that National Guard organizations would take with them motor ambulances for two ambulance companies.5 This was done because the Militia Bureau had provided funds for the purchase of that amount of equipment. Ambulances for the third company were to be provided in France. All ambulances for National Army divisions were to be provided in France.5 So far as can be ascertained very few used machines were sent to France. Those few went with the earlier divisions embarking for overseas service.

The policy of shipping motor trucks knocked down for overseas service was extended to all shipments of such vehicles, as will appear from the following instructions from the Quartermaster General, January 8, 1918: 6

1. In order to conserve in every way possible transport space for the shipment of supplies and equipment for the forces abroad, instructions have been issued to the commanding general of each of the ports of embarkation that all motor trucks, including their bodies, shall be knocked down and crated. This work will be done on all trucks that have reached ports of embarkation or are en route thereto.
2. It is therefore suggested that necessary instructions be issued, in connection with motor trucks that may be furnished by your department, to have this crating done prior to forwarding to ports of embarkation all shipments destined for overseas.

All the 2,400 Ford ambulances purchased on the contract of July 13, 1917, except 50 for the United States Army ambulance service at Allentown, Pa., were shipped to France very rapidly. The Ford Motor Co. advised the Surgeon General, August 8, 1917, that 1,700 ambulances had already been shipped and that the remainder of the order for 2,400 would be delivered by August 15.7 The ambulance service at Allentown informed the Surgeon General that 50 ambulances had been received at that station for training purposes.8 The medical supply officer, Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., reported, September 24, 1917, that 2,218 Ford ambulances had been shipped to that date and


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that 132 were on hand awaiting shipment.9 These 132 ambulances were floated shortly thereafter. A large part of these ambulances had arrived in France before the end of September.10 The sending of this large number of ambulances at that time called forth a severe statement from the commander in chief, November 24, 1917, that there were at that time many hundreds of these machines in excess of the needs.11 And yet these machines proved a blessing in disguise. Approximately 500 of them were transferred to the Quartermaster Corps, Engineer Corps, Signal Corps, and other services in France,12 for truck duty.

Of the 2,200 ambulances delivered under the first two contracts with the General Motors Truck Co., it was estimated that 900 would be required for domestic use. The remainder were to be sent overseas.13 Increasing domestic needs reduced the number for shipment overseas by approximately 200 cars.14 The chassis alone weighed 2,878 pounds. The box in which it was packed weighed approximately 1,200 pounds. The gross weight of the packed box was 4,000 pounds. It occupied 245 cubic feet of space. This bulk could be handled efficiently only by a crane, derrick, or other power machinery.

The first instructions for the shipment of General Motors Co. ambulances to France were issued May 24, 1917, when it was directed that 48 model 15 chassis and as many bodies be boxed and held for shipment upon telegraphic instructions.15 This number was later reduced to 36, all of which appear to have arrived in France.16 The ambulance company accompanying the first convoy took its assembled ambulances, Service Truck Company No. 120.17

As soon as information was received concerning the prospective embarkation of the 26th and 42d Divisions, instructions were issued for the shipment of 108 ambulances and 7 spare parts cars complete.18 These ambulances were shipped through Pier 45, North River, New York City, and were intended for Sanitary Train Nos. 101 and 117, with the 26th and 42d Divisions, respectively.18 The next shipment was authorized October 25, 1917, and called for 120 chassis, 111 ambulance bodies, and 9 spare parts bodies boxed for export. They were forwarded through the port of Baltimore.19 Thereafter practically all shipments of General Motors Co. chassis were made through the port of embarkation at Newport News, Va 20 By the end of November, 1917, 452 ambulances had been placed in transit to the ports for shipment overseas.21 From the 1st of December, 1917, to the end of March, 1918, 120 more ambulances were shipped.22 By the end of June, 1918, 1,283 more ambulances had been forwarded, of which 706 were shipped direct from the factories 23 and 577 from storage (497 at Watertown, N.Y., 24 and 80 at Louisville, Ky.25). Of the 577 shipped from storage 430 were issued to the fourth overseas contingent, United States Army ambulance service, scheduled for service in Italy.26 Thirty additional chassis (without bodies) were turned over to the Quartermaster Corps for issue as gasoline tank trucks to this contingent. This brings the total number of ambulances placed in transit for shipment overseas to the end of June, 1918, up to 1,855. To this should be added the 36 model 15 and the 12 Service Motor Truck No. 120, giving an aggregate of 1,903.

Shipments fell off during July, when only 191 went forward.27 This was improved by the shipment of 475 during August.28 The peak was reached in


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September when 1,041 chassis were shipped.29 This brings the shipments during the quarter ending September 30, 1918, to 1,707, and the total shipments of model 16 General Motors Co. chassis from the beginning in 1917 to that date 3,562, with a total aggregate of 3,610. The shipping records of October and November are not available and the number forwarded during those months is unknown, but the contract appears to have been completed in October and probably all of the chassis left the factory.

The shipping box for General Motors Co. chassis was modified in September, 1918, whereby it not only was made stronger but was reduced in size so that it required but 207 cubic feet of shipping space.30

The difficulties experienced in starting production of new pattern ambulance bodies and the delays in their shipment have already been described. At one time ambulance chassis in considerable numbers were shipped overseas without bodies.

The number of ambulances, General Motors Co. and Ford, produced prior to the cessation of hostilities never reached the estimated requirements. The estimated overseas requirements of April 12, 1918, when the war plans, as transmitted to the Surgeon General, contemplated 26 divisions in France by June 30, 1918, and 40 divisions by the end of the following December, appear below: 31

ESTIMATE

Number of divisions overseas by June 30, 1918................................................................26
Number of divisions overseas by Dec. 31, 1918.................................................................40

AMBULANCES PER DIVISION OVERSEAS

3  motor ambulance companies, 13 ambulances each........................................................39
1 supply train divisional......................................................................................................... 1
1 Heavy Artillery regiment..................................................................................................... 3
1 Light Artillery regiment.......................................................................................................  2
1 field signal battalion (operating independently).............................................................  1_

Total divisional amblances per division overseas..................................................... 46

ADDITIONAL AMBULANCES PER ARMY OVERSEAS

20 avacuation companies, 20 ambulances each................................................................. 400
1 army sanitary train, 4 companies, 13 ambulances each..................................................   52
138 base hospitals, 10 veneral hospitals, 12 convalescent camps, 1 convalescent
depot; 161 hospitals as above, 3 ambulances each........................................................... 644
60 evacuation hospitals, 4 ambulances each.....................................................................240

Total army ambulances overseas................................................................................1,336

TOTAL AMBULANCES OVERSEAS JUNE 30, 1918

26 divisions, 46 ambulances each........................................................................................1,196
Army ambulances overseas..................................................................................................1,336

Total...................................................................................................................................2,532

TOTAL AMBULANCES OVERSEAS DEC. 31, 1918

40 divisions, 46 ambulances each........................................................................................ 1,840
Army ambulances overseas.................................................................................................. 1,336

Total..................................................................................................................................3,176


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This does not include any ambulances to take care of losses, but for purpose of determining the amount of acetylene gas used ambulances for replacement purposes need not be considered. We are figuring 25 per cent loss each six months of service.

As the war plans changed and the flow of troops to France became augmented, the estimated requirements of ambulances rose. Based upon the information available June 20, 1918, and taking wastage into account, the estimated overseas requirements June 30, 1918, were 3,333 ambulances and December, 1918, 5,505.32 The estimate of August 1, 1918, based upon 52 divisions overseas indicated the need by the end of December, 1918, of 6,795 ambulances, or 900 in excess of those delivered and due on contract. 33

The shipment of spare parts for ambulances was never entirely satisfactory. The first shipment went forward November 15, 1917, and consisted of 20 sets of factory spare parts B and a corresponding quantity of spare parts A.34 During June to October, inclusive, 1918, there were placed in transit to France 140 spare parts trailers complete with B equipment, 30 sets of spare parts B equipment, and 2,057 sets of spare parts A equipment.35 These spare parts were provided out of supplies procured by the Medical Department.

SHORTAGE OF AMBULANCES 1918

With the steadily increasing stream of troops transported to France during the spring and summer of 1918 there was a corresponding increase in the demand for motor ambulances for the expeditionary forces. This demand was augmented by the major operations planned for September and by the unexpected epidemic of influenza. While ambulances had been manufactured, boxed for export, and shipped to the ports of embarkation, there was always a tedious delay before they were actually floated. These delays were augmented by the time intervening between the arrival at ports of debarkation and their assembly for delivery to the troops. Loadings on board ship were often so made and the destination of the vessel so changed while at sea that chassis arrived at one port and bodies at another.36 This materially added to the difficulties of assembly. While the ambulance assembly unit left the United States fully equipped with the necessary machinery and parts, conditions at the bases overseas limited the efficiency of this unit.37 These numerous and probably unavoidable delays always left a very wide margin between the number of vehicles shipped from the factory and those available for use in France.

The representative of the Medical Department on duty with the General Motors Truck Co. reported March 18, 1918, the completion of the contracts of April 25, 1917, and June 14, 1917. This report also shows that 1,094 chassis boxed for export had been shipped to ports of embarkation.38 Yet on June 9, 1918, when it would seem that ample time had elapsed to have all these ambulances running on the roads in the rear of the Army in France, a cablegram was received from the commander in chief of the American Expeditionary Forces that there were then available 562 model 16 G. M. C. ambulances, 20 ambulances of miscellaneous models, and 2,611 Ford ambulances.39 A cablegram from the same source a few days earlier had stated that the Medical Department required 100 Ford ambulances and 250 G. M. C. ambulances per month for


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six months beginning July 1, exclusive of the needs of the United States Army ambulance service.40

By the end of July, 1918, the ambulance situation with the American Expeditionary Forces, due to increased combat activity, was growing serious. A cablegram from General Pershing of August 6 stated: 41

Motor ambulance shortage at present date extremely acute. Present shortage is 1,019 G. M. C. and 306 Fords. These figures consider as available for A. E. F. which you state are ready to float or now en route to Newport News. For month of August M. T. C. priority calling for total of 605 G. M. C. and Ford ambulances will cover monthly needs only and will not reduce our accumulated shortage of this transportation. It is imperative that the shortage quoted above, 1,325 ambulances, be made up without delay. If G. M. C. cars can not be furnished, request the entire shortage be covered by shipment of lighter type. Figures given above are in all instances exclusive of needs of U. S. A. A. S.

The commander in chief, A. E. F., was advised by cable, July 12, that 432 G. M. C. ambulances complete were at Newport News ready to float and 55 additional en route.42 On August 16, he was advised by cable:43

There are available and embarkation service have stated that they expect to float during August 100 Ford ambulance chassis and 200 G. M. C. ambulances; 924 available for floating during September, 300 Ford ambulances, 200 Ford ambulance chassis, and 350 G. M. C. ambulances. It is estimated that during October there will be available for shipment 400 Ford ambulance chassis and 800 G. M. C. ambulances. Additional orders on Ford ambulances sufficient to cover your total cable requirements will be placed within two weeks and delivery can be had during September and October.

On August 31, the commander in chief, A. E. F., was further advised that 136 Ford ambulances and 209 G. M. C. ambulances had been freighted, docked, or floated since August 17.44 Rate of production then was Ford ambulances 50 per day, increasing to 126 per day, September 3, and G. M. C. ambulances 400 per month. Shipments were to go forward as follows: 50 Ford ambulances by special train daily until September 3, and then at the rate 126 per day until order for 1,500 was complete. G. M. C. ambulances were being withdrawn from the training camps to balance shortage.

This program apparently did not meet the requirements in the American Expeditionary Forces, for a cable therefrom of September 5 stated that the ambulance shortage there was critical; that 2,000 were needed to make up the existing shortage; that only 150 had been received in August; that 625 were called for on the September priority; and that it was very important that all G. M. C. and Ford ambulances available at seaboard be floated at the earliest possible date.45

On September 14, a reply was made to the foregoing cable to the effect that 511 ambulances had been floated during July and August; that 200 General Motors Co. and 258 Ford ambulances had been shipped to ports of embarkation during the first 12 days of September, of which 109 had been floated; that 479 ambulances were then moving from the camps to the seaboard.46

These various calls for ambulances constrained the Secretary of War to order some hundreds of used ambulances at the various camps to be collected and sent overseas. It was planned to ship these ambulances to the Motor Transport Corps motor repair park at Camp Holabird, Baltimore, Md., for


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repairs before loading them on the transports.46 On September 6 telegraphic orders were sent to the commanding generals at all the larger camps directing them to send without delay to designated central points from 12 to 24 ambulances.47 At these central collecting points the cars loaded with ambulances from the several camps were made up into solid trains of ambulances and moved as special trains to Camp Holabird.

By the time these used ambulances had been loaded on flat cars, assembled at the collecting points, shipped to Camp Holabird, and overhauled and repaired, the armistice had been signed and there was no longer any need for them. It is believed that very few of them ever reached France. New ambulances, both G. M. C. and Ford, were by that time being produced and delivered to the ports more rapidly than they were being floated. At the cessation of hostilities, November 11, 1918, there were at ports of embarkation 1,395 G. M. C. chassis and 517 bodies.48 At the end of October there were 440 Ford ambulances complete at the same ports.49 During October there were floated from all ports 741 Ford ambulances, 58 Ford chassis, 41 G. M. C. ambulances complete, 511 G. M. C. chassis, and 221 G. M. C. bodies.49

AMBULANCE ASSEMBLY UNIT

After their arrival overseas both chassis and bodies had to be assembled, painted, and tested before they could be delivered to the using organizations. Because of the lack in France of personnel familiar with chassis and bodies, considerable difficulty was experienced in assembling the earlier lots sent overseas. These difficulties gave rise to a request from the American Expeditionary Forces, in August, 1917, for personnel trained in the assembling, repair, and maintenance of G. M. C. ambulances.50

This cablegram indicated the need overseas for a motor ambulance assembly base at which all of the heavy type motor ambulances could be assembled. Measures were at once initiated for the development and organization of a suitable unit for this work. Some time was consumed in finding suitable personnel to have charge of the work and in securing commissions for them. Three such persons were selected. Two of them were sent to the H. H. Babcock Co., Watertown, N. Y., to familiarize themselves with the details of assembling bodies and to organize a section for that particular work.51 The third officer was sent to the General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., for a like purpose in chassis assembly. Steps were taken by these officers to secure and train the enlisted personnel in the duties of their respective sections. The enlisted personnel selected were obtained through the draft and all had special qualifications for the particular duties to which they would be assigned overseas. Of the two officers sent to Watertown one was to have general charge of the assembly base overseas and the other to have charge of the body assembly work. The enlisted men sent to the Babcock Co. plant for this work were given a course in body construction and actual work in the assembling department to familiarize themselves with the appearance and location of the individual components of the body. They crated the partly assembled bodies for shipment. They uncrated these bodies and assembled them, following in detail the procedure to be observed overseas. 51


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Similar instruction and training were given to the section organized at the General Motors Truck Co. plant for chassis assembly and testing. Both sections of this unit were then sent to the motor ambulance supply depot, Louisville, Ky., for training in mounting the bodies on the chassis and in the testing and inspection of the assembled ambulance for delivery to the using organization.

Tools and a complete equipment for the assembly base were selected by the personnel and prepared for shipment overseas. An ample stock of parts likely to be needed in this assembly were also secured and prepared for shipment.

The personnel of the motor ambulance assembly unit as finally organized consisted of 3 officers and 61 enlisted men, including a property sergeant arid two cooks. This unit arrived at Fort Jay, N. Y., complete with equipment, early in November, 1917. The unit sailed for France in November, 1917.52 Its equipment, with a few minor exceptions, had preceded it and was located after a prolonged search.53 The unit was broken up into three sections not long after its arrival and assigned to as many different base ports.54

REFERENCES

(1) Letter from First Lieut. J. B. Streit, Sanitary Corps, Base Section 1, A. E. F., to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., January 8, 1918, on conditions at Base Section No. 1, A. E. F. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G.O., 713-440/78.
(2) Letter from the Surgeon General to Capt. A. B. Browne, Sanitary Corps, N. A., Pontiac, Mich., February 6, 1918. Subject: G. M. C. report from overseas. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/78.
(3) First indorsement, Surgeon General, to the Quartermaster General, February 26, 1918.Subject: Cable No. 594, par. 9, G. M. C. ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 250 France/247.
(4) Letters from The Adjutant General, to the commanding generals of all National Guard, National Army, and Regular Divisions, June 17, 1918. Subject: Motor transportation for divisions ordered overseas. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S.G.O., 534-129 Wheeler/140.
(5) Paragraph 2, Cable No. 439-R, November 24, 1917, from The Adjutant General, to the C. in C., Amexforce, France, reference motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 250 F./111.
(6) Letter from the Quartermaster General to the Surgeon General of the Army, January 8, 1918. Subject: Knocking down and crating trucks for overseas shipment. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  750-594 Q. M. G./140.
(7) Letter from Ford Motor Co., Detroit, Mich., to the Surgeon General Gorgas, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C., August 8, 1917, relative to completion of order for 2,400 ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 247/2.
(8) Second indorsement, Headquarters, U. S. Army Ambulance Service, Allentown, Pa., to the Surgeon General, September 17, 1917. Subject: Receipt of Ford ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 247/2.


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(9) Fifth indorsement, Medical Supply Depot, Port of Embarkation, Pier 45, North River, New York City, to the Surgeon, Port of Embarkation, 209 River Street, Hoboken, N.J., September 24, 1917. Subject: Ford ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  247/2.
(10) Paragraph 4, Cable No. 183-S, Headquarters, A. E. F., to the Adjutant General, September 17, 1917. Subject: U. S. Army Ambulance Service. On file, Finance and Supply Division,  S. G. O., Cables-France.
(11) Paragraph 1, Cable No. 3O2-S, Headquarters, A. E. F.. to The Adjutant General, November 24 1917. Subject: Ford ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables-France.
(12) Sixth indorsement, chief of U. S. Army Ambulance Service with the French Army, to the commanding general, Headquarters, Services of Supply, A. E. F., April 6, 1918. Subject: Transfer of Ford ambulances to other departments. On file, Finance and  Supply Division, S. G. O., 20 Allentown/48.
(13) Letter from the Surgeon General, to the officer in charge, Field Medical Supply Depot, Washington, D. C., October 6, 1917. Subject: Export shipment of ambulance chassis. On file, Finance and supply Division, S. G. O., 713-750/65.
(14) Letter from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co., to the Surgeon General, March 25, 1918. Subject: Weekly reports. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports 101 A. B. B./178.
(15) Letter from the Surgeon General, to the officer in charge, Field Medical Supply Depot, Washington, D. C., May 24, 1917. Subject: Motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 11220.-252.
(16) Letter from the Surgeon General to the officer in charge, Field Medical Supply Depot, Washington, D. C., May 26, 1917. Subject: Motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 11220.-252.
(17) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to Colonel McCarthy, Q. M. C., June 1, 1917. Subject: Motor ambulances for France. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O. 11220.-257.
(18) Letter from the Surgeon General to the officer in charge, Field Medical Supply Depot, Washington, D. C., August 23, 1917. Subject: Issue of motor ambulances and spare parts cars to France. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-750/27.
(19) Letter from the Surgeon General to the officer in charge, Field Medical Supply Depot, Washington, D. C., October 25, 1917. Subject: Shipment of motor ambulance chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-250/21.
(20) Weekly reports from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Detroit, Mich., to the Surgeon General, September 29, 1917, to September 11, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports 101 A. B. B./178.
(21)Letter from the officer in charge, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, November 29, 1917. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports 101 A. B. B./178.
(22) Letter from the commander of Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, undated. Subject: Weekly  reports 101 A. B. B./178.


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(23) Letter from the commanding officer, Pontiac, Mich., April 29, 1918, to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101 A. B. B./178.
(24) Letters from First Lieut. Charles A. Woodfield, Sanitary Corps, National Army, Watertown, N. Y., April 1, 1918, and Capt. H. E. Smith, Sanitary Corps, National Army, Watertown, N. Y., April 6, and 29, 1918, to the Surgeon General. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Watertown Weekly Reports, 685 H. E. S./60.
(25) Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., June 1, 1918. Subject: Ambulances to Newport News. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440 Louisville/352.
(26) Letter from the Surgeon General to the medical supply officer, Pier 45, North River, New York, N. Y., April 25, 1918. Subject: Supplies for the 4th Overseas Contingent, U. S. A. Ambulance Service. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  20 Allentown/20.
(27) Letter from the commanding officer, General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Pontiac, Mich., to Motor Transport Service, District Office, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1918. Subject: Trimonthly report, July 21-31, inclusive, 1918. On file, Finance and  Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101 A. B. B./178.
(28) Letter from the commanding officer, Pontiac, Mich., to the Motor Transport Corps, District Office, Detroit, Mich., September 2, 1918. Subject: Trimonthly report, August 21-31, 1918, inclusive. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S.G.O., Pontiac Weekly Reports,  101 A. B. B./178.
(29) Letter from the general manager, General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Motor Transport Corps, Seventh and B streets, Washington, D. C., October 1, 1918. Subject: Chassis production, September. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac letters October 1 to December 31, 1918.
(30) Letter from First Lieut. W. P. Staebler, Sanitary Corps, Pontiac, Mich., to Maj. A. B. Browne, Sanitary Corps, Motor Transport Service, Quartermaster Corps, Washington D. C., September 26, 1918. Subject: Boxing ambulance chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac letters, July-October, 1918.
(31) Letter from the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, to the Motors Division, Quartermaster General’s Office, April 12, 1918. Subject: Estimates of overseas ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-594 Q. M. G./125.
(32) Estimates Covering U. S. Standard Ambulances and Other Motor Equipment Required by the Medical Department, United States Army, June 20, 1918, by Walter T. Fishleigh, Major, Sanitary Corps, Office of the Surgeon General. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G O., Estimates, Motor Transport.
(33) Idem., August 1, 1918.
(34) Letter from the officer in charge, Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville, Ky., to the Surgeon General, November 15, 1917. Subject: Shipments. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  713-250 Fr./20.
(35) Compiled from the following reports on file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Louisville Weekly Reports and Daily Spare Parts Reports. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/398 and 713-440/402.


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(36) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, March 27, 1918. Subject: Shipment of motor ambulances and bodies, and the fourth indorsement thereon, from the medical supply officer, Port of Embarkation, Newport News, Va., May 8, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 250 Fr.//319.
(37) Personal letters from First Lieut. J. B. Streit, Sanitary Corns, N. A., to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., January 8 and 15, 1918, relative to the progress of the motor ambulance assembly unit. On file, Finance and Supply Division,S. G. O., 713-440/78.
(38) Letter from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, March 18, 1918. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101 A. B. B./178.
(39) Subparagraph A, Cable No. 1278-8, Headquarters, A. E. F., to The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C., June 9, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  Cables--France.
(40) Paragraph 3, Cable No. 1237-S, Headquarters, A. E. F., to The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C., June 4, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables--France.
(41) Paragraph 4, Cable No. 1566-S, Headquarters, A. E. F., to The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C., August 6, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables--France.
(42) Paragraph 1-N, Cable 1708-R, War Department, Washington, July 12, 1918, to the commander in chief, Amexforce, France. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables--France.
(43) Paragraph 4, Cable No. 7-R, from The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C., to the commanding general, Services of Supply, Amexforce, France, August 16, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables--France.
(44) Paragraph 1, Cable 1897-R, from The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C., to the commander in chief, Amexforce, France, August 31, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables--France.
(45) Paragraph 3, Cable No. 86-S, from the commanding general, Services of Supply, Amexforce, France, to The Adjutant General, Washington, D. C., September 5, 1918. On file, Finance amid Supply Division, Cables--France.
(46) Paragraph 4, Cable No. 75-R, from The Adjutant General, Washington, D.C., to the commanding general, Services of Supply, Amexforce, France, September 14, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Cables--France.
(47) Telegrams from The Adjutant General, Washington, D.C., to the commanding generals of 23 National Guard and National Army Camps, September 6, 1918, in reference to shipment of motor ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  750-519 M. T. C./15. A.
(48) Memorandum for Colonel Wolfe from Capt. Fred J. Murray, S.C., U.S.A., November 13, 1918. Subject: G. M.C., situation. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-519 M.T.C./17.
(49) Memorandum for Lieut. Col. Dean Halford, from Capt. I. M. Obreight, M. T. C., November 7, 1918. Subject: Ambulances. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-519 M. T. C./17.
(50) Paragraph 5, Cable 102, H.A.E.F., Paris, August 15, 1917. Subject: Repair trucks and mechanicians. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 250 France/2.


406

(51) Letter from Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., to the H. H. Babcock Co., Watertown, N. Y., September 20, 1917. Subject: Body assembly unit. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,  511-570/59.
(52) Report of the Supply Division, S. G. O., to the Surgeon General, for the period ending November 10, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-714/1.
(53) Letter from First Lieut. J. B. Streit, Sanitary Corps, Motor Ambulance Assembling Base, A. E. F., to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., January 8, 1918.Subject: Conditions at the base. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,Overseas Letters,  713-440/78.
(54) Letters from Capt. J. B. Streit, Sanitary Corps, to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., January 15, 1918, and March 12, 1918, relative to the experiences of the motor ambulance assembly unit. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S.G.O.,  713-440/78.