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Chapter XXI

Books and Documents > Medical Department of the U.S. Army in the World War, Volume III, Finance & Supply

CHAPTER XXI

THE AMBULANCE CHASSIS

Since chassis for motor ambulances were manufactured for the Medical Department during the World War by one producing plant a and the bodies for them were manufactured by several other plants, it is essential in the interests of clarity to consider these parts of the motor ambulance separately and as a preliminary to the consideration of other features of the subject of motor ambulances which have a general application.

Following the declaration of war on April 6, 1917, when the question arose as to the selection of a model for the Army motor ambulance advantage was taken of the fact that the General Motors Truck Co., of Pontiac, Mich., had profited by the lessons learned on the Mexican border in 1916, where light ambulances had quickly perished, and had earnestly endeavored to remedy the defects developed in their chassis. They had succeeded, meanwhile, in producing a much improved vehicle--a new ¾-ton truck chassis, which was called model 16.1 The drawings and specifications of this vehicle were submitted to the Medical Department ambulance board on April 18, 1917, for consideration. They were found to be satisfactory. As the company promised prompt delivery, in quantity, the Surgeon General decided to adopt this model as the standard for all motor ambulances to be used in our Army.

At the request of the Surgeon General the Secretary of War, on April 14, 1917, authorized the purchase of 200 motor ambulance chassis from funds then available to the Medical Department.2 Accordingly, contract was made April 25, 1917, with the General Motors Truck Co. for 89 model 15 chassis at $995 each and 111 model 16 chassis at $1,117.3 Delivery of the model 15 chassis was completed by July 5, 1918.4 Shipment of these chassis was made to the Richs-Marbaker Co.’s plant in Philadelphia, Pa., for the mounting of bodies made by that company on a previous contract, and they were held there in storage.5 Delivery of the model 16 chassis began in August and was completed on the 17th of that month.4

A contract for 2,000 chassis, model 16, ¾-ton, at $1,203.04 each, was made with the General Motors Truck Co. June 14, 1917.6 It was stipulated in the contract that deliveries should begin not later than July 20, 1917, and that construction should proceed at such a rate that 1,000 chassis would be ready for shipment by September 1, 1917. The remaining 1,000 were to be shipped by September 25, 1917. A supplemental contract added 2,000 heaters, at $1.56 each. The Government agreed to assist the contractor as much as practicable in securing the needed materials.
______________________________________________________________________________
a Except Ford ambulances. These were manufactured primarily for the U. S. Army ambulance service for service with the French Army, and are considered separately in Chap. XXIII.


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IMPROVEMENTS

In December, 1917, a conference was held in Washington between representatives of a number of the best known spring makers and representatives of the Medical Department for the purpose of designing an ambulance spring with easier riding qualities than the one previously furnished.7 Work on this subject had already been undertaken independently by the Medical Department ambulance inspector at Pontiac, Mich.8 A spring with greatly improved riding qualities was developed at this conference and incorporated in the ambulance on the new contract.8 The new spring, while conforming in a general way in size and appearance to the one in use, was made of better steel and was provided with a short stiff rebound leaf placed above the main leaf of the spring. In addition, Gabriel snubbers were added.

FIG. 15 - G.M.C. chassis, model ‘16

The chassis, under the contract of March 3, 1918, and its supplemental agreements, had many improvements over those on the former contracts, good as they were thought to be. The majority of the changes and improvements are described in the following agreement of December 23, 1917, between representatives of the General Motors Truck Co. and those of the Surgeon General’s Office: 9

1. Springs. - The springs to be used on the new order of chassis are to be those laid down or covered by the approved specifications of the Medical Department, which will be those decided on by the committee present at the recent conference on springs.
2. Starting device. - The motor must be made to start satisfactorily. At present the starting of the engine is very unsatisfactory, and the General Motors Co. is to work in cooperation with the Surgeon General’s Office to better the starting of the engine. Mr. Whitton<


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is to take the initiative and to work in conjunction with Captain Browne to remedy the difficulty. There is to be no charge added to the price agreed upon for this work. This work must not be delayed, but improvement must be made immediately.
3. Spark and throttle. - The spark lever and the throttle, and the sector from which they move, are to be marked so as to distinguish between the spark lever and the throttle, and to indicate the direction of the spark advance and also when the throttle is open and when closed. These improvements are to be made to the approval of the Surgeon General’s representative, and a sample sent to the Surgeon General’s Office.
4. Governors. - The same governor as is being used--i. e., the Monarch--is to be used on the chassis under the new contract. Part of the starting trouble is due to the governor. A new intake elbow may help to solve the difficulty.
5. Gasoline tank attachment. - The gasoline tank is to continue to be attached to the body. If it were attached to the chassis, it would render it difficult to remove the bodies for repairs and would also weaken the support.
6. Tire irons. - The sample tire irons submitted are worthless. They were designed on 35-inch circle and should have been dimensioned to a nonskid tread tire. The words “fit to nonskid tire” should be put on the cut on direction sheet. Two sets of the new tire irons arc to go with each chassis, one to be placed on either side of the ambulance. They are to be shipped in a box with the chassis. The General Motors Truck Co. is to receive $5.30 for each extra set of tire irons. Without a written order, the General Motors Co. is advised to order 1,000 sets of tire irons. A supplementary contract for these and probably more will be made within a few weeks. The Surgeon General’s Office will need at least 1,000 sets for the overseas shipments which have gone, and at least 1,000 additional sets, so the General Motors Co. will be safe in anticipating the contract by ordering immediately 1,000 sets.
7. Front wheels. - Front wheels of the chassis under new contract are to be the same as specified under the former contract. A radial, self-contained bearing would be an improvement.
8. Rims. - The rims for the chassis under new contract are to be the same as those specified under the old contract.
9. Transmission lever ball. - The ball on the gear shift lever on the new chassis is to be metal instead of hard rubber to prevent breakage. It is to be forged on, but until a reasonable opportunity is given the General Motors Co. to change the die for the lever, it may be screwed on and fastened with a pin. Before adoption, it must receive the approval of the representative of the Medical Department at the factory.
10. Inspection, testing, and procedure at the factory- Inspection and test must be made at the direction and to the approval of the representative of the Surgeon General’s Office at the General Motor Truck Co’s. factory. In order to check overseas shipments, inspection thereof may be conducted as follows: This representative, or one of his men, may take out at random any machine ready boxed for shipment, have it placed in a clear space selected by the Surgeon General’s representative, unpacked according to his directions, set up according to his directions for his inspection. When it receives his approval, it is to be taken apart and reboxed. If the chassis inspected in this manner is found to be defective, more frequent examination will be necessary, and if many imperfectly packed machines are found, the Surgeon General’s representative may require every box to be opened.
11. Dash choke control. - A dash choke control was discussed as a probable addition to the chassis under the new contract, but it was decided not to install it, as with such choke control the ordinary driver floods the cylinder with gasoline which destroys the effect of the oil and adds to the wear of the cylinders.
12. Storage. - The Surgeon General’s representative stated that the Medical Department desires the General Motors Co. to provide for a maximum storage capacity for 500 chassis for three months. The representative of the General Motors Co. stated that the company could not do this without building additional sheds, and that this would make it necessary for them to add to the contract price named. It was finally agreed that without extra charge the General Motors Co. will store not to exceed 200 chassis for a period not to exceed three months.


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13. Quantity production. - The representatives of the General Motors Co. stated that the company could easily produce 200 chassis every month, including February. If desired by the Surgeon General’s Office, the company can produce 500 chassis per month. It was finally agreed that the company is to produce and deliver 400 chassis in February, 400 in March, and 200 in April, on or before the 15th of the month. It was understood that the delivery need not be uniform daily.
14. The total number ordered . - The total number of chassis to be covered by the contract is to be 1,000, with an option given to the Surgeon General’s Office of ordering an additional 500 or 1,000 to be delivered at the rate of 400 a month. This option is to be exercised on or before March 25, and the company agrees to build any extra chassis ordered under this option at the same price as specified for the 1,000 covered by the contract, plus any actual increase in cost occasioned by necessary advances in the price paid by the company for the materials and labor used in the production of the chassis ordered. Any such advances are to be proved to the commanding officer and approved by him. The price under contract is to be $1,224 per chassis. If storage of the chassis is made on wheels, the Surgeon General’s Office is to arrange for inspection and payment before the machines are boxed and shipped. The company is to box and load on cars the stored machines whenever ordered to do so by the Surgeon General’s Office, without extra charge.
15. Rear fender irons. - The rear fender irons of the present chassis are too short and the body now bottoms frequently in the fenders. The new contract is to provide for longer fender irons made so as to raise the fenders toward the top of the body.
16. Heaters. - The heaters for the ambulances are to be furnished by the Surgeon General’s Office, and the General Motors Co. is to attach them to the chassis. The labor of attaching that part of the heater attachment which fastens on the chasis is to be done by the company without extra charge, and any materials not furnished with the heater and required to be used in fastening the same to the chassis are to be furnished by the company without extra charge. The heaters are to be boxed with the chassis without extra charge.
17. The company is to send a trained man or men to Louisville, or to any other place in this country where serious difficulties and emergencies in connection with the operation of their trucks purchased by the Medical Department arise, to assist in the solution of the same. The decision as to the necessity for such action is to rest entirely with the Surgeon General’s Office.
18. Bond. - If the contract requires a bond to be given by the company, the price of the bond is to be added to the contract.
19. War excise tax. - The 3 per cent war excise tax on the value of each motor vehicle sold and any increase thereof levied on the sales covered by this contract is to be added to the price hereinbefore named.
20. Insurance. - The company is to insure the stored chassis and to provide a watchman to patrol the storehouse. The Government is to reimburse the company for the premiums on this insurance and for the wages of the watchman.
21. Cancellation claims. - The cancellation clause in the regular contract form is to be stricken out.
22. Improved design and equipment. - Any desired additions to equipment, over and above those specified, are to be made by the company on the order of the Surgeon General’s Office, and the company is to receive, in addition to the compensation hereinbefore named, the cost of such addition plus 10 per cent thereof.
23. Acceleration of deliveries. - The company agrees to do everything in its power, at the direction of the Surgeon General’s Office, to force deliveries. The order must be gotten out even though getting it out on time adds to the expense of production by the company.
24. Extra tires. - It is understood that there are to be no extra tires furnished with the chassis.
25. Floor board. - The floor board is to be removable.

MODEL AA CHASSIS

With a view of standardizing the light ¾-ton truck and increasing the range of facilities for its manufacture, the Quartermaster General had four sample chassis built according to a standard design. They were built at four


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different automobile factories. The Quartermaster General advised the Surgeon General in December, 1917, that this chassis would be ready for test about January 15 and that it was his intention to turn one of them over to the Medical Department for test and experiment if that department desired it. It was expected that the Medical Department would use a large number of such a chassis and should have an opportunity to experiment with it before it went into production. It was suggested that a suitable body be prepared in time to be installed on the chassis at the factory. This standard chassis was designated model AA.10 By the time this standard AA chassis was available for delivery the new AA body had been completed and was ready for mounting. The chassis was given a careful, thorough, and extensive test by the personnel of the Medical Department experimental station in Washington. The conclusions reached with regard to this sample AA chassis are contained in the following extract from a report made to the Acting Quartermaster General, March 25, 1918:11

In general, information is forwarded that, at the time when original conferences upon this AA chassis were held, a schedule for experimental work, and for subsequent quantity production, as well as the original designs laid down, were such as to appeal to the Medical Department for a possible use in connection with motor ambulance service.

The time already lost, and the apparent impossibility of getting a satisfactory design in the quantity production for some months yet, together with changes in design which have been made, and which are of critical importance to the Medical Department, when consideration is made of interchangeability of chassis parts already provided in large quantities, and ambulance bodies already produced and under contract for covering practically the entire medical requirement for the next year--all have critical bearing upon the advisability of the Medical Department considering the change over to this chassis at such time as production is begun.

Information is forwarded that in the original conferences, at which technical automo bile representatives of the various departments were present, the importance was appreciated of the fact that the Medical Department would perhaps be the largest user of this chassis, and that interchangeability of critical chassis parts, and of bodies for this chassis, were of prime importance. Since the designs were begun, at least four gentlemen have had active executive direction of this work, and, without further conferences or close personal cooperation, it is quite natural that the original considerations which were critical in determining certain important features have been overlooked in subsequent development.

The following specific points deserve consideration:
(1) The latest proposal for spring dimensions, while no doubt making for easier riding qualities, is regarded as unnecessary, even for first-class ambulance service. The lack of Interchangeability of springs upon this job and the present ambulance job means that the entire spring supply being carried in spare parts “B” equipment with each ambulance company, and already shipped overseas, must be applicable to the new chassis, necessitating a complete duplication of all spring supply.
(2) The latest proposal of the use of 36 by 6 tires, front and rear, may cause interference with both old and new design ambulance bodies, and will at least necessitate two complete stocks of tires. No consultation has been had on this change, but information comes indirectly that the change is made because of tires already carried overseas by the Signal Corps, and because certain tire manufacturers made this recommendation. Information is forwarded that the Medical Department regards the matter of critical importance, in view of the fact that this department already has thousands of spare tires provided in this country and overseas of the original 35 by 5 size, that we have had assurances from tire manufacturers of satisfactory mileage, and already have sufficient data to show excellent results.


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(3) Information comes indirectly to this department that the use of radius rods and torque tube, which was requested by the various War Department representatives at the original conferences, has been discarded in favor of the Hotchkiss drive, which was discussed pro and con at these conferences and not approved. In order to cheek the opinion of the engineers of the Medical Department, within the last three months this department has taken this matter up personally with four of the most prominent engineers in the United States, all of whom have had extensive experience with touring car and pleasure car Hotchkiss drive designs, as well as the recommended radius rod and torque tube construction, and whose opinion, therefore, can be given weight, with the following result: Three of these engineers recommend the use of the radius rods and torque tube, feeling that, for war service, this construction is as least as good as any possible Hotchkiss drive construction, and all three being of the opinion that their use will provide an additional safety factor. One felt that a Hotchkiss drive might be designed for a truck which would equal the design using radius rods and torque tube.
(4) The question is raised at this time, whether, since the Medical Department has already in service, or in immediate production, 3,100 of these ¾-ton chassis, and has in contemplation the immediate ordering of 1,000 or 2,000 more, and since it is understood that there are practically no jobs of this type in the service of the other departments, in quantity-- whether it would not be possible to adopt this type as the standard for the various departments which now contemplate limited use of the same. Information is forwarded that, after severe winter service at the various camps, this chassis has been found to be mainly satisfactory, and inasmuch as it is only an assembled job at best, containing a combination of the various best units assembled by the General Motors Truck Co. at their Pontiac factory, its manufacture in quantities such as to cover the needs of the various departments, could readily be undertaken by any companies in position to handle the AA job. This question is raised in the full realization of the seriousness of the problem confronting the Medical Department in changing horses at this time directly in the middle of the stream, and it is not made without appreciating the detail changes in the design worked up for the AA chassis, which would be of prime consideration if the use of this type of chassis in the service were just being begun.
(5) The tests already conducted upon the AA chassis, by engineers in charge of motor ambulance work for the Medical Department, have developed the following suggestions, which are forwarded:

* * * * * *

(a) Grease leaks have developed in the rear right wheel, due to defective packing. (b) The support of the complete steering column is not sufficiently rigid. (c) Maximum governor’s speed required for ambulance service is 20 miles per hour. (d) Starting is defective. (e) Radiator tubes vibrate critically at about 25 miles per hour in such way as to promise serious consequences. (f) Clutch and break pedals are crowded too close to steering column. (g) Gasoline tank drain pet cock located directly above exhaust pipe. (h) Grease cups on springs, etc., are quickly broken, and the cover springs easily torn off and covers lost. (i) The clutch spring tension is too heavy for anything like continuous operation. (j) The starting crank is too long, causing interference when cranking. (k) The filler cap on radiator is too much involved. A more simple method of designing is recommended. (1) The oil gauge location on the motor is inaccessible. (m) The running boards should be dropped 1 ½ inches to permit carrying of necessary ambulance first-aid and food boxes. The running board lower tire carrier can be made 1½ inches less in depth, so that ground clearance at this point remains the same. (n) A deeper frame section or frame reinforcement on this job is recommended. (o) Spring brackets, front and rear, have objectionable offsets and weak sections. (p) The gear shift from “first” to “low” is abnormal, due to the low step between these two gears. While agreeing that a high gear ratio is desirable, it is believed that the interval between shifts should be changed. (q) Riding qualities of the rear end have been quite disappointing, not comparing with the results of the old G. M. C. chassis for the Medical Department with the same springs. Careful study of the proportioning and structure of the radius rods, torque tube, rear springs, and rear axle might explain the trouble, but the Medical Department has not yet undertaken the same.


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Extensive and comprehensive tests of the ¾-ton chassis of different makes and designs, including the AA and the General Motors Co. chassis, were made during the late spring of 1918. As a result of these tests, it was decided to adopt the General Motors Co. model 16 design as the standard AA truck. This was done in order that other manufacturers might be put upon the work. Inasmuch as the purchase of all motor chassis had devolved meanwhile upon the Motor Transport Service, that service planned to let contracts on July 27, 1918, for 5,000 AA chassis in addition to those already ordered from the General Motors Truck Co. It was intended to place these contracts with at least three other companies.12 This number was increased later to 7,200 distributed among 13 factories.13 It appears, however, that none of these factories came into production before the cessation of hostilities and all the contracts were canceled.13 While the majority of these chassis were intended for use by the Quartermaster Corps, a part of them were intended to meet increased ambulance requirements.

NEW CONTRACTS

GENERAL MOTORS TRUCK COMPANY

The estimated requirements of the Medical Department for motor ambulances during the first year of the World War, prepared about the time of our entry into the conflict, were 4,500 such vehicles. This number was based on an estimate of 70 ambulances per division from front to rear, allowing 25 per cent additional for replacements and providing extras for emergencies. The estimate included ambulances for three motorized ambulance companies with each division, for an evacuation ambulance convoy for each two divisions, and for the ambulances needed at base and general hospitals both in the line of communications and in the home territory. By the end of 1917 a more adequate conception of the military situation and its resultant needs was had by the War Department. The strength of the Army was being rapidly augmented. To meet the ambulance needs of this expansion it early became evident that motor ambulances would be required in ever-increasing number. The original estimates were revised in November, 1917, and again in January, 1918.14 The latter were the more comprehensive. A summary of the machines previously purchased, available under existing contracts, and those required to be produced June 30, 1919,14 appears below. It will be seen that the production of chassis was the chief factor in determining the number of motor ambulances in the field.

Estimates covering United States standard ambulances required by the Medical Department, United States Army


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Estimates covering United States standard ambulances required by the Medical Department, United States Army - continued

The original contracts of April 25, 1917, and June 14, 1917, with the General Motors Truck Co. for 200 and 2,000 chassis, respectively, were completed before March 15, 1918.15 During the production of these chassis a number of minor changes and improvements in design had been made, but more were needed. The General Motors Truck Co. was advised in November, 1917, that if satisfactory changes in several details of design and satisfactory procedure, production, and storage agreements could be reached, an order for an additional 1,000 ambulance chassis would be given it.16 Satisfactory agreement having been reached, a contract was entered into February 16, 1918,


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for 1,000 chassis with option on part of the Government to increase that number to 3,700.17 A production rate of 200 to 500 chassis per month was stipulated. The price to be paid for the first 1,000 chassis was $1,224 per chassis. The contract contained a provision for an increase in price to cover Federal taxes and increases in cost of materials and labor on all orders in excess of the 1,000 chassis. The option to increase the number of chassis was exercised by the Government. An order for 1,700 chassis under this option was placed in April, 1918,18 and a supplemental agreement was entered into July 25, 1918, to cover the order.17 A second order for the remaining 1,000 chassis was placed with the company in June, 1918,18 but this order does not appear to have been covered by a supplemental agreement. The prices paid on these orders were 800 at$1,277.92, 900 at $1,286.17, and 1,000 at $1,311.89 plus 3 percent war tax.

PRODUCTION

Troubles with motors and transmissions had been experienced under former contracts, resulting in annoying delays. The same complaint continued during the early days of production under the new contract. Difficulties in assembly developed in the factory and required drastic action on the part of the Medical Department representative at the factories. Delays were encountered in receiving parts from subsidiary manufacturers.20 Production under the new contract did not begin until the week of April 20, 1918.21 Defects in the motors being received, even then, retarded production.20 Production on the new contract and its two increases were as follows: April, 377; May, 361; June, 427; July, 342; August, 509; September, 923; October, 761. Total 3,700.22

For various reasons the stipulated rate of production could not be maintained. The rate of production actually accomplished was as follows: August 7 to September 10, 1917, 208; September 11 to October 1, 492; October 2 to November 3, 563; November 5 to 28, 202; November 30, 1917, to January 3, 1918, 259; January 4 to 19, 103; February 2 to 28, 104; March 1 to 16, 74; total, 2,000.23

STORAGE PENDING DISTRIBUTION

One of the difficulties encountered in ambulance production was that of storage pending distribution. Chassis boxed or standing are bulky units and require storage out of the ordinary. The huge boxes of the boxed chassis, weighing 4,000 pounds, could be handled only by power-operated machinery. Either overhead cranes or steam derricks were required for the purpose.

Early in September, 1917, the plant of the General Motors Truck Co. became congested with assembled chassis.24 The motor ambulance supply depot was also crowded with unassembled vehicles and demanded cessation of shipments. There were 127 carloads of material on the tracks in Louisville and many more enroute.25 Tonnage for overseas shipments could not be had. Relief of some sort from this acute congestion was necessary. Storage must be found.

Pontiac, Detroit, and adjacent territory as far as Buffalo, N. Y., were canvassed for storage facilities, but no covered storage at a reasonable rate could be found.26 It was finally decided to box all chassis in excess of the 900


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required by the ambulance depot and store them in the open protected by tar paper and canvas. Space for this purpose was found at Watertown, N. Y., in the plant of the H. H. Babcock Co. That company agreed to receive, unload, store, and reload the boxed chassis at $5 each, plus the cost of insurance.26

FIG.16. - This and Figure 17 show a method of boxing G.M.C. chassis for shipment.

Ambulance shipments overseas were to be made at the rate of 120 completed ambulances per month. Such a schedule necessitated the storage of approximately 600 boxed chassis. It was decided to send that number to Watertown. Arrangements accordingly were made October 1, 1917.27 Shipments thereto began October 6, 1917, with 13 carloads of 6 chassis each.28 By the end of the month 252 chassis had been shipped.29 By the end of October, 1918, the congestion both at the General Motors Truck Co. plant and at the ambulance supply depot had been cleared. Shipments to Louisville and overseas increased and production of chassis fell off. No further storage difficulties were experienced. By the end of January, 1918, 516 chassis had been forwarded, and shipment ceased. 30

FACTORY SHIPMENTS OF BOXED CHASSIS

The first lot shipped from the factory under the February, 1918, contract consisted of 96 chassis and went forward April 27, 1918. Subsequent shipments on this contract, so far as can be determined from records available, were as follows: April, 112; May, 381; June, 395; July, 199; August, 578; September (first 10 days), 302. This gives a total shipment of 1,967 chassis, of which


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1,828 went to ports of embarkation. The remaining 139 chassis were shipped for domestic use.31

A report from the office of the chief of embarkation service, November 13, 1918, indicated that approximately 1,395 General Motors Co. chassis were at ports of embarkation, 243 were in transit, and 311 had been released for shipment but not placed in transit.32 This would indicate that approximately, 700 of the 3,700 chassis on these contracts actually found their way to France.

Of the number of chassis produced under the supplemental contracts of April 25, 1917, and June 14,1918, 36 of the model l5and 1,O94 33 of the model l6, boxed for export, were forwarded to ports of embarkation, or a total of 1,130.

FIG. 17

It would appear, therefore, that only about 2,830 boxed chassis reached France. It is not known how many standing ambulances were shipped, but it is believed that their numbers were not great.

REFERENCES

(1) Letter from the sales manager, General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., to Maj. R. E. Noble, M. C., chairman, motor ambulance board, April 11, 1917. Subject: Model 16 ¾-ton chassis. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 153,155.-30.
(2) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, April 7, 1917. Subject: Purchase of G. M. C. chassis, and the First Indorsement thereon, April 14, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 11,220.-190.


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(3) Contract between Lieut. Col. C. R. Darnall, M. C., and the General Motors Truck Co., April 25, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Contracts, 13,420-F.
(4) Schedule of deliveries attached to contract of April 25, 1917, with the General Motors Truck Co. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Contract, 13,420-F.
(5) Correspondence between the Surgeon General to the officer in charge, Field Medical Supply Depot, Washington, D. C., and the Quartermaster General, September 21, 1916-October 18, 1916. Subject: Storage of motor ambulance bodies. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 11,220.-86.-86-1.
(6) Contract between Lieut. Col. C. R. Darnall, M. C., and the General Motors Truck Co., for 2,000 chassis, dated June 14, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Contracts, 285.
(7) Report of the activities of the motor ambulance section of the Surgeon General’s Office, June 28, 1918, unsigned. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 490 Memo./310.
(8) Letter from the officer in charge, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, December 17, 1917. Subject: Springs. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 511-570 M. A. P./B.
(9) Report of conference on the purchase of G. M. C. chassis for ambulances, December 23, 1917. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 239 W.T.F./31.
(10) Letter from the Quartermaster General, to Major Fishleigh, Motor Car Department, Medical Corps, U. S. A., December 4, 1917. Subject: Medical body for AA truck. On file Finance and Supply Division S. G. O., 750-594 Q. M. G./54.
(11) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General of the Army, March 25, 1918. Subject: AA chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 750-594 Q.M.G./110.
(12) Letter from Statistics Branch, General Staff, to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, July 15, 1918. Subject: Synopsis of contracts for motor vehicles. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O.,239 W.T.F./40.
(13) America’s Munitions, 1917-18. Government Printing Office, 1919, 502.
(14) Estimates covering U. S. standard ambulances required by the Medical Department, U. S. Army, January 20, 1918, by Maj. Walter T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, N. A. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Estimates.
(15) Weekly report from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co., to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, March 11, 1918. On file, Financeand SupplyDivision, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101 A.B.B./178.
(16) Letter from the Surgeon General to Capt. A. B. Browne, Sanitary Corps, N. A., Pontiac, Mich., November 24, 1917. Subject; Additional model, 16 orders. On file, Financeand Supply Division, S. G. O., 511-570/B.
(17) Contract of February 16, 1918, between Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., and the General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., for 1, 000 model 16 G. M. C. chassis. On file, Miscellaneous Section, Finance Department, S. G. O.
(18) Memorandum from Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, N. A., to Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., April 10, 1918. Subject: Additional G. M. C. ambulance chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 490 memo. /277.


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(19) Letter from the Surgeon General to Maj. J. P. Fletcher, M. C., Louisville, Ky., June 5, 1918. Subject: Increase of ambulance chassis order. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G.O., 713-440/342.
(20) Weekly reports from commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co., to the Surgeon General for the weeks ending March 11, 1918, to June10, 1918. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101 A. B. B. /178.
(21) Weekly report of April 22, 1918, from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101 A. B. B./178.
(22) Letter from the General Motors Truck Co., by W. F. Maybury, to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, July 26, 1918. Subject: Ambulance chassis production. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 451.8-1.
(23) Schedule of deliveries attached to contract of June 14, 1917, with the General Motors Truck Co. for 2,000 model 16 chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Motor Transport Contracts, 285.
(24) Telegram from the General Motors Truck Co., Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, September 11, 1917, for relief from congestion of assembled chassis in factory. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 267/ 9.
(25) Letter from Maj. John P. Fletcher, M. C., Motor Ambulance Supply Depot, Louisville Ky., to Lieut. Col. Edwin P. Wolfe, M. C., S. G. O., September 15, 1917. Subject: Excess chassis shipments. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 713-440/47.
(26) Telegram from Capt. A. B. Browne, Sanitary Corps, to Maj. W. T. Fishleigh, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., September 28, 1917. Subject: Storage of chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 511-570/B.
(27) Letter from the H. H. Babcock Co., to the Quartermaster, Eastern Department, October 1, 1917, relative to storage of boxed chassis. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 45-H. H. B./16.
(28) Letter from Capt. A. B. Browne, Sanitary Corps, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, October 13, 1917. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 101-A.B.B./178.
(29) Letter from the officer in charge, General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, October 29, 1917. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 101-A. B. B./178.
(30) Letter from the officer in charge, Sanitary Corps, N. A., General Motors Truck Co. Plant, Pontiac, Mich., to the Surgeon General, January 28, 1918. Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., 101-A. B. B./178.
(31) Letters from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, Pontiac, Mich., during the period April 22, 1918, to September 11, 1918, to the Surgeon General and to the Motor Transport Corps, District Officer, Detroit, Mich. Subject: Weekly reports, and trimonthly reports. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., Pontiac Reports, 101-A. B. B./178.


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(32) Memorandum for Colonel Wolfe from Capt. F. J. Murray, Sanitary Corps, November 13, 1918. Subject: G. M. C. situation. On file, Finance and Supply Division. S.G.O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 750-519 M. T. C./17.
(33) Letter from the commanding officer, Sanitary Corps, General Motors Truck Co. Plant, April 15, 1918, to the Surgeon General, Subject: Weekly report. On file, Finance and Supply Division, S.G.O., Pontiac Weekly Reports, 101-A. B. B./178.