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Preface

Table of Contents

PREFACE

An attempt is made in the following pages to outline a system for estimating, on the basis of our casualty experience in past wars, the requirements for medical service including hospitalization and evacuation of front line casualties; and further to show how intimately the question of replacements for all branches of an army is related to casualty rates, and also to prompt and efficient medical care.

It has been recognized for a number of years both here and abroad that the more efficient the medical service and the nearer the hospitals are to the combat zone, other conditions being equal, the smaller the demands for untrained replacements. Consequently, provisions for an adequate medical service and sufficient hospitalization should be an essential part of every war plan.

The only excuses that can be offered by the author, who makes no claim of having, any more than a rudimentary knowledge of mathematics, for not leaving the task to some one better qualified are: First, that he felt that he was reasonably well acquainted with the sources of information and the available basic material; second, that no one better qualified had sufficient time or interest in the subject to undertake it.

For the convenience of the reader, a great many figures have been drawn so as to serve the double purpose of illustrations and tables, although this has often resulted in unorthodox construction.

This work was made possible by General M. W. Ireland, whose thorough knowledge of the medico-military organization and his sympathetic appreciation of the various problems that are connected with it, are a constant help and inspiration to all members of the Medical Department.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to Dr. L. J. Reed, Professor of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University, for training in statistical methods while in that institution and for his assistance during the early stages of the work. He has not had an opportunity to follow the development of the study nor to examine the completed manuscript.

Lt. Colonels H. C. Gibner, G. L. McKinney, A. D. Tuttle and C. C. McCornack have made many helpful criticisms and suggestions.

Grateful acknowledgment must be made also to Mr. B. M. Oppenheim for his construction of the Figures, and also for his assistance in the computations.

ALBERT G. LOVE 
December 17, 1930.

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