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Foreword

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FOREWORD

The statistical records of the World War, setting forth the incidence of disease, injuries and battle casualties and of the work of the Medical Department during that period have been inscribed in history. As in the case of the Civil War, these records are of great interest from the standpoint of medical science and, for military purposes, furnish the soundest basis for war planning. For the latter purpose, however, these data must be subjected to careful analysis, taking into consideration all evident and conceivable factors creating or influencing them. Upon the figures of experience thus obtained, and comparing the past with present and future conditions, must be based our estimates of the losses to be expected and of medical service requirements in future military operations.

In his official position in the Surgeon General's Office, Colonel Love has had before him the records of the World War and his study of them has been painstaking and exhaustive. The facts and deductions from Colonel Love's study are now available for use by the war planning agencies in estimating Medical Department requirements as to supply, transportation, evacuation, hospitalization, and other essential features that enter into the development of the medical service. Particularly is this study valuable in determining more accurately than by previous methods the hospitalization requirements in any given situation, so that the result can become an entry in the special plan under consideration and thus constitute a directive rather than a contention.

As the wounded and sick returned to duty afford a valuable source of trained replacements, this work will also be of value in studies relating to personnel procurement and replacement.

C. R. REYNOLDS,
Colonel, Medical Corps, U. S. Army,
Commandant, Medical Field Service School.

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