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Chapter XXV

Contents

CHAPTER XXV

CAMP HOSPITALSa

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 1b

Camp Hospital No. 1 was established in July, 1917, at Gondrecourt, Department Meuse, in the advance section, by Field Hospital No. 13. It was located in temporary wooden barracks, of French construction, with a bed capacity of 300, and it served the first training area. In the latter part of October, 1917, Field Hospital No. 13 was relieved by Field Hospital No. 12 which, in turn, was relieved on November 12, 1917, by Field Hospital No. 1. Field Hospital No. 3 relieved No. 1 in January, 1918, and Field Hospital No. 162 relieved the latter on April 7, 1918, and operated the hospital until July 18, 1918, when it was relieved by personnel permanently assigned. Camp Hospital No. 1 ceased to function May 12, 1919; all of its remaining patients on that date were transferred to Base Hospital No. 91, at Commercy. The personnel of the hospital sailed for New York from St. Nazaire, June 14, 1919, on the Santa Barbara and were demobilized June 28, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 2c

Camp Hospital No. 2 was organized December 21, 1917, at Bassens, Department Gironde, base section No. 2. The hospital, when first organized, was located in two wards, Service de Santé type, of 60-bed capacity, and served rest camp No. 4, near Bordeaux. Additional buildings were constructed from time to time to accommodate the increasing number of patients, until, in February, 1919, the bed capacity of the hospital was 600. The hospital ceased functioning June 11, 1919. The detachment was skeletonized and sailed from Bordeaux on June 17, 1919, on the Otsego, and was demobilized at Camp Jackson, S. C., July 7, 1919.

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 3d

Camp Hospital No. 3 was established June 26, 1918, at Bourmont, Department Haute Marne, advance section. The personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large, and consisted of 10 officers and 60 enlisted men. The hospital occupied a standard type B, 300-bed hospital and began to function July 4, 1918, with the arrival of the 37th Division. It served the

aThe numbers of the camp hospitals considered in this chapter do not form a complete series; that is to say, unless a camp hospital, which had been given a definite number, actually operated it has not been included herein.-Ed.
bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 1, A. E. F.," Gondrecourt, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 2, A. E. F.," Bassens, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 3, A. E. F.," Bourmont, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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third training area, which at different times was occupied by the 37th, 42d, 78th, 82d, 29th, and 26th Divisions. During its active service, July 4, 1918, to March 26, 1919, the hospital received 2,332 medical and surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 3 ceased to function March 26, 1919. The personnel sailed from Brest on the President Grant May 28, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., June 14, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 4e

Camp Hospital No. 4, at Joinville le Pont, in the district of Paris, was established April 26, 1918, in a small group of old and dilapidated school buildings. At first there were neither modern plumbing nor sewer connections; no hot-water plant was available, and baths had to be prepared from water heated on small oil stoves. The bed capacity at first was 300, which later was increased to 800 by the erection of several wooden barracks. The hospital was operated by hospital unit C. Patients were received first on May 24, 1918; the first battle casualties arrived July 17, 1918, 100 wounded being in the convoy. The hospital continued to receive wounded until the armistice; the largest number received in one day was 450, on July 30, 1918. It also functioned as a post hospital for the district of Paris and received all the sick and venereal cases from our military prisons in Paris. The largest number of patients in hospital at one time was 825, on September 8, 1918. During its existence, the hospital received 9,800 patients, about 25 per cent of which
 

FIG. 148.-Camp Hospital No. 2, Bassens

 

eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 4, A. E. F.," Joinville le Pont, by Lieut. Col. Samuel E. Lambert, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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were battle casualties. Camp Hospital No. 4 ceased to function on June 5, 1919, and its personnel (unit C) returned to the United States, sailing from St. Nazaire July 3, 1919, on the Alaskan, and was demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, July 21, 1919.
 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 5f

Camp Hospital No. 5 was established officially on February 27, 1918, at Genicart, Department Gironde, base section No. 2. Prior to that time this hospital was known as the Camp Infirmary and served rest camp No. 2, near Bordeaux. The hospital buildings were wooden barracks of French construction and had a total bed capacity of 500. On November 24, 1918, rest camps Nos. 1 and 2 were consolidated into the "Bordeaux embarkation camp," and Camp Hospital No. 5 was designated as the entrance hospital of the camp. The hospital ceased to function June 12, 1919, and its personnel were skeletonized to 1 officer and 20 enlisted men, who sailed from Bordeaux for the United States July 1, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 19, 1919.
 

FIG. 149.-Camp Hospital No. 4, Joinville

 

fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 5, A. E. F.," Genicart, by Maj. H. B. Montgomery, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 7g

Camp Hospital No. 7 was organized June 3, 1918, at Humes, Department Haute Marne, advance section, and served the seventh training area. The hospital occupied a type B, 300-bed unit, with emergency expansion to 370. It was operated first by Evacuation Hospital No. 4 and later, in July, 1918, by Field Hospital No. 310. When the latter organization was sent to the front, the hospital was manned by personnel from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. Patients were received first on July 27, 1918. During its activity the hospital cared for 2,576 medical and 402 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 7 ceased to function on March 17, 1919, its remaining patients being then transferred to Base Hospital No. 53, at Langres.
 

FIG. 150.-A ward interior, Camp Hospital No. 7, Humes

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 8h

Camp Hospital No. 8 was established June 26, 1918, at Montigny-le-Roi, Department Haute Marne, advance section, its personnel being obtained from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied a standard type B, 300-bed unit, the construction of which had been completed when the organization arrived; however, it was only about 50 per cent equipped. Camp

gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 7, A. E. F.," Humes, by Capt. J. P. McQuillin, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 8, A. E. F.," Montigny-le-Roi, by Maj. Virgil E. Simpson, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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Hospital No. 8 served the eighth training area, which was occupied successively by the 83d, 91st, and 26th Divisions. During the influenza epidemic in November and December, 1918, Field Hospitals Nos. 101 and 103 were established on the hospital grounds and cared for the overflow of the camp hospital. During its activity the hospital cared for 3,020 medical and 331 surgical cases. On April 22, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred to Base Hospital No. 63, at Langres; Camp Hospital No. 8 ceased to function on that date. The detachment proceeded to Brest, whence it sailed for New York on June 10, 1919, on the Agamemnon, and was demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, June 24, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 9i

Camp Hospital No. 9 was established in June, 1918, at Chateau Villain, Department Haute Marne, advance section. Its personnel were mobilized at Blois from officers and enlisted men of the American Expeditionary Forces at large, and arrived at station June 25, 1918. The hospital occupied a standard type B, 300-bed unit, with emergency expansion to 400. Construction of the hospital had been completed prior to the arrival of the personnel; part of the equipment was on hand. This hospital served the ninth training area, and began to receive patients on June 26. During its active service it cared for 3,390 surgical and medical cases. On March 25, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred to other hospitals, and Camp Hospital No. 9 ceased to function. The personnel sailed for Newport News, Va., from Brest on the Freedom, May 25, 1919, and were disbanded at Camp Sherman, Ohio, June 17, 1919.
 

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 10j

Camp Hospital No. 10 was established in April, 1918, at Prauthoy, Department Haute Marne, advance section, and began to operate April 20, 1918. It was a standard type B, 300-bed unit, with emergency expansion to 360; it served the tenth training area, which was successively occupied by the 32d, 29th, 79th, and 82d Divisions. During the months of April and May, 1918, the hospital was operated by the medical staff of the 32d Division and upon departure of that division was operated temporarily by Evacuation Hospital No. 5. On June 28, 1918, the permanent personnel of Camp Hospital No. 5 arrived, and took charge July 1, 1918. The hospital ceased to function on March 23, 1919, and its personnel was reassigned to other organizations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 11k

Camp Hospital No. 11 was established March 12, 1918, at St. Nazaire, base section No. 1. The personnel comprised Sanitary Squad No. 1 and Field Hospital No. 44. When first organized, the hospital occupied a standard

 

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 9, A. E. F.," Chateau Villain, by Maj. Clarendon W. Brown, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 10, A. E. F.," Prauthoy, by Maj. John W. Emhardt, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 11, A. E. F.," St. Nazaire, by Maj. Ward Brinton, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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type B, 300-bed unit, but later, when the activities of the port demanded more hospital facilities, necessary buildings were added. On July 31, 1918, a venereal segregation camp was established in connection with the hospital, and cared for all patients with venereal disease coming into that port. In April, 1919, the hospital comprised 38 wooden barracks, with a total bed capacity of 703. During its existence, this hospital cared for a total of 12,291 medical and surgical cases, including 5,085 cases of venereal disease. On June 18, 1919, it was designated Infirmary, St. Nazaire, and ceased to function as a camp hospital on that date. Its personnel, with exception of a skeletonized unit, were reassigned to duty with the infirmary. The skeletonized Camp Hospital No. 11, consisting of 1 officer and 4 enlisted men, sailed July 10, 1919, on the Amphion, from St. Nazaire, and was demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, July 28, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 12l

Camp Hospital No. 12 came into existence October 12, 1917, at Le Valdahon, Department Doubs, advance section, when camp hospital, 1st Field Artillery Brigade, A. E. F., was redesignated Camp Hospital No. 12. It occupied a French military hospital, comprising three buildings of stone and several Service de Santé type huts, with a total normal bed capacity of 300. It served the fiftieth training area. During the influenza epidemic in September, 1918, the rate of admissions was so great that all vacant buildings in the camp, including the Y. M. C. A. hut, were utilized for hospital purposes. The greatest number of patients in hospital was on September 29, 1918, when 1,335 were being cared for. As the number of medical officers on duty was entirely inadequate, line officers were assigned by the brigade commander to assist in the administration of the hospital. Enlisted men of the line were used for fatigue, in kitchen, office, and, in many instances, in ward work. Camp Hospital No. 12 ceased to function on May 23, 1919; its personnel sailed on June 24, 1919, from Brest for New York on the Huntington and were demobilized at Camp Gordon, Ga., July 6, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 13m

Camp Hospital No. 13 was established November 13, 1917, at Mailly, Department Aube, advance section, its personnel
being obtained from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. The hospital occupied 17 Service de Santé type barracks, built for and occupied by the Russians in 1916. Its bed capacity was 450.

Camp Hospital No. 13 served our miscellaneous troops in the Mailly area; during its active service, November 13, 1917, to December 31, 1918, it cared for 5,656 medical and surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 13 ceased to function December 31, 1918, the property was returned to the French, and the personnel assigned to other organizations for further duty.

lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 12, A. E. F.," Le Valdahon, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 13, A. E. F.," Mailley, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 14n

Camp Hospital No. 14 was established October 15, 1917, at Issoudun, Department Indre, intermediate section, and served the third aviation instruction center. Personnel were obtained locally. When opened, the entire hospital was housed in one American Red Cross building, 25 by 60 feet, but later, when construction of the hospital had been completed, it consisted of 17 ward buildings, surgical building, quarters and messes for the personnel and had a normal bed capacity of 575.

During its existence this hospital cared for approximately 7,000 surgical and medical cases. Camp Hospital No. 14 ceased to function on April 15, 1919; its personnel sailed on May 25, 1919, from Bordeaux on the Chicago, and were demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, June 17, 1919.

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 15o

Camp Hospital No. 15 was established in October, 1917, at Coetquidan, Department Ille et Vil, base section No. 1. Its personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied three large stone buildings, and several Adrian barracks, and had a total bed capacity of 900. The hospital served the Meucon Artillery training area and began to receive patients November 1, 1917. In September, 1918, a venereal segregation camp was established in connection with Camp Hospital No. 15. The greatest number of patients in hospital at one time was 900-in September, 1918. Camp Hospital No. 15 ceased to function June 30, 1919, and its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire for Newport News, Va., July 9, 1919, on the Buford, and were demobilized shortly afterward.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 19p

Camp Hospital No. 19 was established December 23, 1917, at La Courtine, Department Creuse, base section No. 2. The personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. When first opened, the hospital functioned in three widely separated French buildings, in a training camp. At first its bed capacity was 140; later, when construction was completed, it comprised 8 buildings, with a normal bed capacity of 500. During its existence the hospital cared for 3,025 surgical and medical cases. Camp Hospital No. 19 ceased to function May 31, 1919; its personnel returned to the United States, sailing from Bordeaux, June 20, 1919, on the Canandaigua, and were demobilized at Camp Jackson, S. C., shortly afterward.

nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 14, A. E. F.," Issoudun, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O.,Washington, D. C.-Ed.
oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 15, A. E. F.," Coetquidan, by Maj. William L. Edmundson, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 19, A. E. F.," La Courtine, by First Lieut. James H. MacDuffie, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 20q

Camp Hospital No. 20 was established November 11, 1917, at Camp de Souge, Department Gironde, base section No. 2. It functioned in barrack-type buildings, constructed by the United States Engineers, and had a bed capacity of 750. This hospital served the troops in Camp de Souge, the second aerial observation and balloon school, and several billeting areas. Camp Hospital No. 20 ceased to operate May 2, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other organizations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 21r

Camp Hospital No. 21 was established February 8, 1918, at Bourbonne-les-Bains, Department Haute Marne, advance section. It served the eleventh training area, which was occupied successively by the 29th, 78th, 82d, 92d, Divisions, and the Sixth Army Corps. The hospital operated in a modern building, a hotel, which had been constructed at the beginning of the war. This building was of concrete and consisted of seven stories and a basement. There was an electric elevator connecting all floors. The normal bed capacity was 300. On April 10, 1918, hospital unit L arrived and took over Camp Hospital No. 21. During its existence, the hospital cared for 5,455 medical and surgical cases. It ceased to function April 25, 1919; unit L returned to the United States, sailing from Marseille, May 15, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., June 13, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 22s

Camp Hospital No. 22 came into existence January 5, 1918, at Langres, Department Haute Marne, advance section, when Camp Hospital A was taken over by a medical detachment from Field Hospital No. 163 and was redesignated Camp Hospital No. 22. This hospital had been operated since November 15, 1917, by a detachment from the sanitary unit of the 9th Infantry, and had a bed capacity of 100. It occupied a three-story, stone building, situated outside the inner walls of the fortification of Langres, and was one of the group of buildings called Turenne Barracks. It served the seventh training area, but the majority of its admissions were from Army candidate and Signal Corps schools, at Langres. On June 11, 1918, the hospital was closed, but was reopened on June 26, 1918. It was finally closed on February 28, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other organizations for duty.

qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 20, A. E. F.," Camp de Souge, by Lieut. Col. Edward F. Geddings, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 21, A. E. F.," Bourbonne-les-Bains, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 22, A. E. F.," Langres, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 23t

Camp Hospital No. 23 was established January 8, 1918, at Langres, Department Haute Marne, advance section, its personnel being taken from Field Hospital No. 163 and Ambulance Company, No. 163. The building in which it was located was part of the Collége de Jeunes Filles and had been occupied by the French Medical Department. Its bed capacity was 100. Many improvements had been made in the building, such as installation of running water, shower baths, and flush latrines. It also contained a completely equipped laboratory, pharmacy, and operating room. The hospital served the officers at the Army school headquarters at Langres and averaged about 45 patients throughout its period of operation. The first patients were admitted February 1, 1918. During July, 1918, the Langres hospital center was opened; this, together with Camp Hospital No. 24, made the existence of Camp Hospital No. 23 no longer essential, so it was closed August 15, 1918, and its personnel were reassigned to other organizations for duty.
 

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 24u

Camp Hospital No. 24 was established in January, 1918, at Langres, Department Haute Marne, advance section, and was operated by Field Hospital No. 165. This institution served the Langres training area and had a bed

 FIG. 151.-Camp Hospital No. 22, Langres

 

tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 23, A. E. F.," Langres, by First Lieut. Alan C. Dutton, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 24, A. E. F.," Langres, by Maj. Alexander Nicoll, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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capacity of 500. It occupied the French Hôpital Complémentair No. 3, and consisted of a main building of 4 stories, an annex of 2 stories, and 2 other buildings, 1 of which was used as the kitchen and the other as the morgue. When we took them over, the hospital buildings were old and practically unfurnished; the entire plumbing system was in a poor condition. On March 13, 1918, hospital unit H, arrived and was assigned permanently to Camp Hospital No. 24, which it took over on March 27, 1918. The unit renovated the buildings and, after many difficulties, succeeded in installing some plumbing fixtures such as flush toilets and baths. During its existence, 6,288 patients were admitted; of these 4,487 were medical and 1,801 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 24 ceased to function March 15, 1919, and its personnel were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 118, Brest, for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 25v

Camp Hospital No. 25 was organized in January, 1918, at Blois, Department Loir et Cher, intermediate section, its personnel being obtained from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It operated in 7 old, widely separated French buildings, with a normal bed capacity of 939. This institution was also used as a casual station for nurses. On July 3, 1918, Base Hospital No. 43 arrived and took over the operation of Camp Hospital No. 25. On January 20, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 35 relieved Base Hospital No. 43 and functioned until March 12, 1919, when it was skeletonized to 1 officer and 4 enlisted men, who were returned to the United States, and the hospital reverted to its former status, that of Camp Hospital No. 25. The remaining personnel of Evacuation Hospital No. 35 were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 25, remaining until closure of the hospital on May 13, 1919. The personnel of Camp Hospital No. 25 returned to the United States by way of Brest, sailing on the America, June 9, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., June 22, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 26w

Camp Hospital No. 26 was organized April 26, 1918, at Noyers, Department Loir et Cher, intermediate section, its personnel coming from Field Hospital No. 161. When established, the hospital occupied 15 wooden barracks, of the Morajan type, each accommodating 32 patients. In addition to the hospital at Noyers, two annexes were maintained, one of 200-bed capacity in Hôspice de St. Aignan, and another of 500-bed capacity, at Pont le Voy. The latter was used as a convalescent hospital. Camp Hospital No. 26, while considered a 1,500-bed hospital, often in emergency treated as many as 2,200 patients at one time. It served the entire first replacement depot at St. Aignan-Noyers, and up to December 31, 1918, admitted 15,967 medical and surgical cases. Its dental department grew in proportion to the hospital, and at one time there were 23 dental officers on duty. Also it was used as a school, training dental assistants for the whole American Expeditionary Forces. The hospital ceased to function on June 12, 1919, and its personnel returned to the United States on the Antigone. Sailing from St. Nazaire on June 18, 1919, the personnel arrived at Camp Hill, Va., June 28, 1919, and were demobilized shortly afterwards.

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 25, A. E. F.," Blois, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 26, A. E. F.," Noyers, by Lieut. Col. William C. Riddell, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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FIG. 152.-Camp Hospital No. 24, Langres



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CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 27x

Camp Hospital No. 27 was established February 4, 1918, at Tours, Department Indre et Loire, intermediate section, and was operated by the personnel of  Evacuation Ambulance Company No. 3. The hospital occupied a former French military hospital, located in the École des Filles Superior, Tours. It served the Arrondissement of Tours, which included about 20,000 troops and approximately 18,000 German prisoners of war. When first taken over, the hospital accommodated about 300 patients; later, the capacity was increased to 650. On March 5, 1918, Evacuation Ambulance Company No. 3 was relieved by Mobile Hospital No. 1 (hospital unit K), which then took over Camp Hospital No. 27. During the year ending February 4, 1919, this hospital admitted 4,063 medical and 937 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 27 ceased to function in August, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest for New York August 10, 1919, and were demobilized August 25, 1919.
 

FIG. 153.-Interior, officers' ward, Camp Hospital No. 28, Nevers

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 28y

Camp Hospital No. 28 was established February 4, 1918, at Nevers, Department Nievre, Intermediate section, its personnel being obtained from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied a school building, L'ecole

xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 27, A. E. F.," Tours, by First Lieut. Kenneth W. Pugh, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The History is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 28, A. E. F.," Nevers, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The History is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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Normale d'Institutes, which at the time of the establishment of Camp Hospital No. 28 was used by the French Government as a military hospital. The Capacity of the hospital, as originally planned, was 150 beds, but later this was increased to 450. Camp Hospital No. 28 served not only the troops at Nevers but also those in the surrounding area, whose radius varied in extent from 20 to 40 miles. The number of troops ranged from 8,000 to 15,000. On March 7, 1918, hospital unit S reported for duty and took over the hospital. From February 4, 1918, to December 1, 1918, the hospital admitted a total of 3,030 surgical and medical cases. Camp Hospital No. 28 ceased to function June 13, 1919; its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire June 23, 1919, on the Santa Cecilia, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 10, 1919.
 

FIG. 154.-A group of wards, Camp Hospital No. 29, Le Courneau

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 29z

Camp Hospital No. 29 came into existence February 29, 1918, at Le Courneau, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. The hospital was located on the outskirts of a large camp, which later became known as Camp Hunt, and occupied a number of buildings which had been used by the French as a military hospital. The bed capacity of the entire plant was 960. It served the miscellaneous troops in the Courneau area and at times received wounded from the forward areas. During its existence, the hospital admitted a total of 6,897 surgical and medical cases; the greatest number of patients in hospital at one time was 1,017, on September 23, 1918. Camp Hospital No. 29 ceased to function on March 1, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other organizations in the American Expeditionary Forces for further duty.

zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 29, A. E. F.," Le Courneau, by Maj. John G. Towne, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



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CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 31a

Camp Hospital No. 31 was established April 15, 1918, at Meucon, Department Morbihan, base section No. 1, its personnel being taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. The hospital occupied the site of what formerly had been the old French artillery training camp, and was erected to serve the artillery training camp for the American Expeditionary Forces, which was about 2 miles distant. It comprised 12 low buildings of wood and stone, which had been used by the French as quarters for the troops in training. In addition to these barracks, a new surgical building of brick and stone and quarters for the personnel were built; the total capacity was 700 beds. It ceased to function April 3, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other organizations for duty.
 

FIG. 155.-Camp Hospital No. 33, Camp Pontanezen

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 33b

Camp Hospital No. 33 was established January 15, 1918, at Camp Pontanezen, Department Finistere, base section No. 5, by a detachment of 5 medical officers and 40 enlisted men, detached from Base Hospital No. 34. When first opened, the hospital was located in an old French concrete building, which formerly had been used as barracks. Many difficulties were experienced at this time in the care of the sick, as hospital supplies were very difficult to obtain. Medical equipment consisted of the contents of medical and surgical chests. Except for candles, there were no lighting facilities. On February 1, 1918, in addition to the old stone barracks then occupied by the hospital,

aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 31, A. E. F.," Meucon, by Lieut. Col. J. A. Worthington, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 33, A. E. F., Camp Pontanezen, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D.C.-Ed.



763

a fairly modern three-story, fireproof building was taken over. Later, when increased hospital facilities were necessary, 8 Adrian-type barracks were erected, to acommodate 35 patients each, and four 300-foot barracks. These structures completed the hospital plant inside the walls of Caserne de Pontanezen. When further expansion was necessary, 15 additional hospital buildings were constructed in the area outside the wall of the caserne, immediately behind the original hospital site, thus giving a maximum bed capacity of 2,600. Twenty-four additional wards, kitchens, supply rooms, dispensary, officers' and nurses' quarters were constructed in this area. Also, large huts were erected both on the inside and outside areas by the American Red Cross.

Camp Hospital No. 33 served the entire port of Brest. Although it treated more patients than did the majority of the base hospitals in France, and served the largest camp in the American Expeditionary Forces, it never was rated as a base hospital.

Due to the absence of any sewerage system and to the climatic conditions, the problem of sanitation was a serious one and became more complicated as the number of patients in hospital increased. Latrines of the can type were used, the cans being emptied by French contractors, who proved to be very unsatisfactory. The difficulty in rendering these latrines flyproof and sanitary was practically insurmountable; the use of an incineration plant was impracticable, due to the scarcity of wood and straw.

During the period from January 15, 1918, to June 30, 1919, this institution admitted 28,233 medical and surgical cases. The majority of its patients were medical, which up to June 30, 1919, included 4,814 cases of mumps, 3,521 of influenza, and 2,205 of pneumonia.

Camp Hospital No. 33 ceased to function December 29, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest December 30, 1919, on the George Washington, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., shortly afterward.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 34c

Camp Hospital No. 34 came into existence on March 20, 1918, when the camp infirmary at the American rest camp, Romsey, England, was designated Camp Hospital No. 34. This infirmary had been in operation since December 26, 1917, the personnel to operate it being detailed temporarily from organizations passing through the camp. At first, the hospital consisted of a small permanent building and four British hospital tents, of a capacity of about 14 beds. In the fall of 1918, 300-bed hospital was being constructed. During its existence as a camp hospital, it received 1,748 surgical and medical cases; largest number of patients admitted in one month was 433, in September, 1918. Camp Hospital No. 34 ceased to function November 30, 1918, its personnel being reassigned.

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 34, A. E. F.," Romsey, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



764

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 35d

Camp Hospital No. 35 was established January 19, 1918, at the American rest camp, Winchester, England, its personnel being taken from the American Expeditionary Forces casually at that camp. When opened, it was known as the United States hospital, American rest camp, Winchester, England, and on April 5, 1918, received its designation as Camp Hospital No. 35. It occupied two groups of structures, situated about one-eighth of a mile apart, in portion of the camp known as Avington Park. The capacity was intended to be 250 beds, but later additions were made so that the capacity of the hospital was 500, with an emergency expansion in tents to 679. The majority of the cases admitted were medical, among which were the cases of communicable disease among our troops arriving in England. During its existence, January 19, 1918, to February 4, 1919, it cared for 5,226 medical and 177 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 35 ceased to function February 4, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other stations for further duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 36e

Camp Hospital No. 36 was established in February, 1918, at Southampton, England, to serve the Southampton rest area. At this time, the hospital was temporarily quartered in tents and had a capacity of 80 beds. Construction was begun on June 22, 1918, the type of construction being sectional huts. The wards were arranged in pairs, each pair connected by an ablution block, containing toilets, lavatories, and shower baths. The operating block and mess halls were to be connected with all the wards by a covered corridor, 5 feet wide. The hospital was about 50 per cent completed when construction was ordered stopped on November 28. During its existence, the hospital cared for 1,462 medical and 48 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 36 ceased operating December 2, 1918, and its personnel were reassigned to other organizations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 37f

Camp Hospital No. 37 was established March 15, 1918, at Romarantin, Department Loir et Cher, intermediate section, to serve Air Service production center No. 2, located about 3 miles from Romarantin. The hospital was located in a school for young girls and was an old three-story building of brick and cement, having four wings and a cross bar forming the letter H; two of these wings were occupied by the hospital, the other two were retained by the school. Later, barracks, mess halls, and bathhouses were erected on the grounds for the personnel and several tents for patients to provide for emergency used and for contagious diseases. With these additions the bed capacity
 

dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 35, A. E. F.," Winchester, England, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 36, A. E. F.," Southampton, England, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 37, A. E. F.," Romarantin, by Maj. Lucius F. Donohoe, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



765

was increased from 150 to 235. During its existence 2,279 medical and 152 surgical cases were admitted. Camp Hospital No. 37 ceased to function February 28, 1919, when its designation was changed to infirmary, Air Service production center No. 2.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 38g

Camp Hospital No. 38 was established May 7, 1918, at Chatillon sur Seine, Department Cote d'Or, advance section. Its personnel was taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied hospital buildings taken over from the French, of 200-bed capacity, and served the personnel and students of the Second Army Corps schools. The plumbing and sanitary equipment of the hospital was very poor. During its existence, the hospital cared for 1,771 medical and 378 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 38 ceased to operate March 31, 1919; its personnel were returned to United States and demobilized in April, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 39h

Camp Hospital No. 39 was established March 1, 1918, at La Rochelle, Department Charente Inferieure, base section No. 7, its personnel being assigned from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located at a distance of about 2½ miles from La Rochelle, in an old stone building known as the Château Perigny, and in several wooden barracks, erected by the United States Engineers. The capacity of the hospital was 375 beds. It served the La Rochelle and La Pallice areas and began to receive patients on July 29, 1918. The base laboratory for base section No. 7 was located at the hospital and performed all bacteriological work for that section. The hospital ceased to operate May 16, 1919; its personnel returned to the United States, sailing from Bordeaux for New York, on the Ohioan, June 9, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., shortly afterward.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 40i

Camp Hospital No. 40 was established in April, 1918, at the American rest camp, Knotty Ash, Liverpool, England. When first established, it consisted of a number of marquee tents of about 150-bed capacity and was intended as a contagious disease hospital for the Liverpool rest camp. From May 27, 1918, to June 6, 1918, the hospital was operated by hospital unit Q and from June 7, 1918, by hospital unit W. On August 10, 1918, a contract was let for a permanent 500-bed hospital of brick and concrete construction. The new institution consisted of two separate divisions, a general section and a contagious disease section. These sections were so constructed as to permit their use as a whole or independently of each other.

gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 38, A. E. F.," Chatillon sur Seine, by First Lieut. Joseph M. Weldon, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 39, A. E. F.," La Rochelle, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 40, A. E. F.," Knotty Ash, Liverpool, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



766

The general section consisted of an administration building, a modern surgery, six wards, kitchen, messes, and a large recreation hall. The buildings were connected by a canopied runway which started at the center of the administration building and traversed the entire block. Also there were a central heating plant and quarters for the personnel. The contagious disease section consisted of an administration building, 11 wards and a kitchen, all connected by a canopied runway.

Due to the shortage of labor and to frequent strikes, the new hospital was not ready for occupancy until the latter part of January, 1919, although some parts of it were put to use in December, 1918. During its existence, the hospital cared for 3,909 medical and 901 surgical cases. The greatest number of patients in hospital was 859, on September 30, 1918.
 FIG. 156.-Camp Hospital No. 41, Is-sur-Tille

Camp Hospital No. 40 ceased to function April 30, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest May 4, 1919, on the Haverford, and were demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., May 23, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 41j

Camp Hospital No. 41 was opened on March 11, 1918, at Is-sur-Tille, Department Côte d'Or, advance section, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was of barrack construction and consisted of an administration building, nine wards, supply building, mess halls, and personnel quarters; its capacity when completed was 500 beds. It served the command at Camp Williams, Is-sur-Tille, which at times numbered as many as 24,000, and all the sick taken from troop trains passing through the regulating station at Is-sur-Tille. All cases for X ray, and all eye, ear, nose, and throat cases needing special treatment were transferred from it to Base Hos-
 

jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 41, A. E. F.," Is-sur-Tille, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



767

pital No. 17, at Dijon; also most of the laboratory work was done at the central Medical Department laboratory at Dijon. Prior to October 1, 1918, all major surgical cases and fracture cases were transferred to Dijon, and only minor surgical and emergency cases were treated locally; however, after a large surgical ward with modern operating room had been completed in October, all surgical cases admitted were cared for at Camp Hospital No. 41.

During its first year, March 11, 1918, to March 31, 1919, the hospital admitted 12,270 medical and surgical cases; the greatest number of patients admitted in one month was 1,589, in December, 1918.

The hospital ceased to function May 23, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest, July 1, 1919, on the President Grant, and were demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., shortly afterwards.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 42k

Camp Hospital No. 42 came into existence in May, 1918, at Bar-sur-Aube, Department Aube, advance section, and was operated by the personnel of Ambulance Company No. 161. It occupied a type B, 300-bed unit, constructed by the United States Engineers, and served the thirteenth training area, which was occupied successively by the Artillery headquarters of the Army, the 5th and 36th Divisions, and headquarters of the first Army. It was not fully equipped until the latter part of July and August, 1918, when it began to function to its full capacity. From June 5, 1918, to October 26, 1918, the hospital was operated by Ambulance Company No. 42; subsequently by personnel from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. From May 5, 1918, to March 1, 1919, 3,274 patients were admitted; of these 3,039 were medical and 235 surgical. The greatest number of patients in hospital was 478, on September 27, 1918. Camp Hospital No. 42 ceased to function April 20, 1919; its personnel sailed from Marseille, May 15, 1919, on the Canadaand were demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa., June 9, 1919.

 FIG. 157.-Camp Hospital No. 42, Bar-sur-Aube

 

kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 42, A. E. F.," Bar-sur-Aube, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



768

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 43l

Camp Hospital No. 43 came into existence in April, 1918, at Gievres, Department Loir et Cher, intermediate section, when the post hospital there was designated Camp Hospital No. 43. The post hospital had been in operation since November, 1917, and prior to February 25, 1918, was known as the regimental infirmary, 15th Engineers. It served the various troops and civilian laborers (Chinese and Spanish) stationed at Gievres. When first established the hospital consisted of two wooden barracks; however, when construction was completed in September, 1918, it operated in 24 buildings, of 400-bed capacity. In addition to the barracks, about 20 hospital tents were used constantly for the accommodation of the large number of mumps cases brought in with arriving troops. In August, 1918, an X-ray machine was installed, and the hospital functioned practically as a base hospital. Prior to that time, all major surgical cases and fractures were transferred to Base Hospital No. 9, at Chateauroux.

On February 10, 1919, Base Hospital No. 94, operating at Pruniers, ceased to function as a base hospital and became a part of Camp Hospital No. 43. Base Hospital No. 94 consisted of 50 buildings. On taking over this hospital, the old camp hospital was designated a contagious-disease hospital and used for contagious, skin, and venereal diseases. Camp Hospital No. 43 ceased operating in August, 1919, and its personnel were returned to United States.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 44m

Camp Hospital No. 44 was established April 14, 1918, at Riom, Department of Puy-de-Dome, intermediate section, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. The hospital occupied the picturesque old Château de Miroble, which was leased from the owner, and is located about 10 km. from the city of Clermont-Ferrand. The original function of the establishment was to serve the seventh aviation instruction center. First patient was admitted on April 25, 1918, and from July to December, 1918, the bed capacity of 200, was not entirely utilized by the sick of the flying field; many ambulatory and slightly wounded were received from Base Hospitals Nos. 20 and 30. Camp Hospital No. 44 ceased operating December 4, 1918, and the personnel were distributed to other hospitals in the American Expeditionary Forces.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 45n

Camp Hospital No. 45 was established July 8, 1918, at Aix-les-Bains, Department Savoie, intermediate section, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. The hospital occupied the Leon Blanc Hospital, on the outskirts of Aix-les-Bains. The establishment served the Aix-les-Bains leave area and cared for sick and injured from all the surrounding areas. During the summer most of the patients were victims of
 

lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 43, A. E. F.," Gievres, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.,-Ed.
mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 44, A. E. F.," Riom, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 45, A. E. F.," Aix-les-Bain, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



769

bicycle accidents and mountain climbs. In the fall of the year, influenza and pneumonia made its appearance and necessitated the erection of several wooden barracks to accommodate the large increase of hospital admissions; the bed capacity of hospital expanded from 70 to 260. Camp Hospital No. 45 ceased operating May 23, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest June 29, 1919, on the General Washington, and were demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., July 12, 1919.
 

FIG. 158.-Camp Hospital No. 45, Aix-les-Bains

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 46o

Camp Hospital No. 46 was established May 16, 1918, at Landerneau, a small town about 14 miles east of Brest, Department Finistere, base section No. 5. Its personnel were assigned from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied a part of a large French convent school, the Pensionnat du Calvare, which was suitable for hospital purposes, as it contained many large well lighted and ventilated rooms; however, the sanitary arrangements were exceedingly poor and no adequate water supply existed. A detachment of United States Engineers was attached to the hospital to install the necessary plumbing and to provide a sufficient water supply; also several wooden barracks for the personnel were constructed by the Engineers, and the bed capacity of the hospital was increased from 250 to 300. Camp Hospital
 

oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 46, A. E. F.," Landerneau, by Maj. James Breslin, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



770

No. 46 was intended for convalescent patients only, but it received cases of acute disease and of injury from its surrounding area. During December, 1918, only venereal cases en route to the United States were admitted. The total number of patients admitted during its existence was 1,150. The hospital was closed February 28, 1919, and its personnel were transferred to Camp Pontanezen, Brest, for duty.
 

FIG. 159.-Camp Hospital No. 46, Landerneau

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 47p

Camp Hospital No. 47 was established in June, 1918, at Autun, Department Saone et Loire, intermediate section, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. This organization remained until July 30, 1918, when it was relieved by Base Hospital No. 45. The base hospital unit remained until August 19, 1918, when it was transferred to Toul for duty. The hospital remained vacant until September 24, 1918, when casual personnel arrived and reestablished Camp Hospital No. 47, which then occupied a French building, the Caserne Billard, originally a seminary and later used by the French as barracks; its capacity was 500 beds. The first patients were received October 10, 1918, from a hospital train, about 344 in number and nearly all convalescing. This institution functioned as a camp hospital until November 1, 1918, when its designation was changed to Base Hospital No. 208.
 

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 47, A. E. F.," Autun, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



771

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 48q

Camp Hospital No. 48 came into existence in June, 1918, at Recey-sur-Ource, Department Côte d'Or, advance section, and was operated by Field Hospital No. 42. It occupied a type B, 300-bed unit and served the fourteenth training area, which was occupied by the Sixth Division. On October 28, 1918, Field Hospital No. 42 was relieved from duty at Camp Hospital No. 48 and casual personnel were assigned in its place. Over 5,000 patients were cared for in this institution. Camp Hospital No. 48 ceased to function on May 27, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest on June 22, 1919, on the Montana, and upon arrival in the United States were transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa, for demobilization.

FIG. 160.-Camp Hospital No. 48, Recey-sur-Ource

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 49r

Camp Hospital No. 49 was instituted in July, 1918, at Laignes, Department Cote d'Or, advance section, and was operated by personnel from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in a type B, 300-bed unit and served the fifteenth training area, which was occupied by the 7th and, later, by the 80th Division. Only minor medical and emergency surgical cases were treated; all major surgical cases were transferred to Base Hospital No. 17 at Dijon. Patients were first admitted September 22, 1918; and during its existence, 2,658 surgical and medical cases were cared for. The greatest number of patients admitted in one month was 803, in December, 1918. Camp Hospital No. 49 ceased operating April 11, 1919, and its personnel were returned to the United States.
 

qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 48, A .E. F., "Recey-sur-Ource, by Lieut. Col. Alva S. Pinto, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 49, A. E. F.," Laignes, by Capt. C. P. Gammon, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



772

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 50s

Camp Hospital No. 50 was established in September, 1918, at Tonnerre, Department Yonne, advance section, its personnel coming from Sanitary Squads Nos. 8, 17, and 38. It occupied a type B, 300-bed unit and served the sixteenth training area, which was successively occupied by the 81st Division, First Army Corps, 36th and 80th Divisions. The majority of the surgical cases cared for at this hospital were emergency and minor cases; all major and chronic surgical conditions were transferred to Base Hospital No. 17, at Dijon. During its existence, the hospital cared for 4,120 surgical and medical cases; the greatest number of patients admitted in one month was 835, in February, 1919. Camp Hospital No. 50 ceased operating May 5, 1919; its personnel sailed June 15, 1919, from St. Nazaire on the Texan, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 51t

Camp Hospital No. 51 was authorized June 19, 1918, at Roanne, Department Loire, intermediate section. It occupied 2 separate groups of buildings about one-half mile apart, 1 consisting of 12 French wooden barracks, the other of 4 stone buildings; the total capacity was 800 beds. Both of the groups were well-equipped, containing modern lighting facilities and sewer systems. In July, 1918, Base Hospital No. 48 was assigned to this station for duty, but remained only a few days. The hospital remained unoccupied until in September, 1918, when permanent personnel was assigned. The majority of the patients received were convalescents from the hospital center at Vichy. During its existence, the hospital cared for approximately 3,000 surgical and medical cases; the greatest number of patients in hospital at one time was 1,108. It ceased to operate November 21, 1918, and its personnel, with the exception of a few officers, were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 57, at St. Amand, for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 52u

Camp Hospital No. 52 was established in August, 1918, at Le Mans, Department Sarthe, intermediate section, its personnel being taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in the old monastery, which had been occupied by the French complementary hospital No. 49. The monastery was poorly suited for hospitalization, for its large halls and high ceilings and stone floors made it damp and difficult to heat. Plumbing and wiring were insufficient and a large force of men was required to keep the building in repairs. In addition to the monastery, 2 schools, a girls' and a boys' normal school, each accommodating about 200 patients, were taken
 

sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 50, A. E. F.," Tonnerre, by Capt. Samuel L. Wadley, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 51, A. E. F.," Roanne, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 52, A. E. F.," Le Mans, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.




773

over from the French. These schools were only a few hundred yards distant from the main building and were designated as annex Nos. 1 and 2, respectively. Annex No. 3, a mumps camp under canvas, was erected about 750 yards from the main building; it accommodated about 750 patients. The total normal bed capacity was 1,700, although in emergency as high as 2,000 patients were cared for at one time. The strength of personnel varied; during the winter of 1918-19, it averaged 60 officers, 650 enlisted men, and 90 nurses. This institution served the 2d Depot Division area, which at times contained as many as 200,000 troops. It handled a large number of patients, and up to December 31, 1918, admitted among others over 4,500 cases of mumps; the surgical service performed 380 operations. It was well equipped in all departments and practically functioned as a base hospital. No battle casualties were received.

Camp Hospital No. 52 ceased operating July 1, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest July 5, 1919, on the Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm, and were demobilized at Camp Gordon, Ga., July 23, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 53v

Camp Hospital No. 53 was organized in September, 1918, at Marseille, Department Bouchet du Rhone, base section No. 6; its personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located on the principal street of Marseille, the Boulevard Prado, and occupied a large stone building formerly used as a theological institution. Its original bed capacity of 300 was increased to 500. Camp Hospital No. 53 served the port of Marseille and was opened for patients on September 25, 1918. The hospital ceased to function in June, 1919; its personnel returned to the United States and were demobilized at Camp Taylor, Ky., on July 23, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 54w

Camp Hospital No. 54 was established in September, 1918, at Beaulieu, Department Dordogne, base section No. 2, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in Château la Roche, a fairly modern, three-story, country estate, built of stone; however, the château had been unoccupied for many years prior to the war, and it was not in a good state of repair. The area served by the hospital soon was unexpectedly occupied by the 84th Division, and much difficulty was experienced in obtaining food, supplies, and transportation for the sick. The normal capacity of hospital was 150 beds. On October 2, 1918, Field Hospital No. 333 took over the hospital, and its designation was changed to Camp Hospital No. 78 (q. v.) The personnel were transferred to the new organization for duty.
 

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 53, A. E. F.," Marseille, by Maj. S. Calvin Smith, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 54, A. E. F.," Beaulieu, by Maj. Bernard J. Beanker, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



774

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 55x

Camp Hospital No. 55 was established during the month of January, 1918, at Ferrieres, Department Loiret. It was located in an old stone monastery which had been used as a hospital by the French during the early period of the war. The personnel of this hospital was drawn from the United States Army Ambulance Service with the French Army. The function of the hospital was to care for the sick of that organization. It ceased operating on May 18, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 56y

Camp Hospital No. 56 was established July 29, 1918, at Avoine, Department Indre et Loire, intermediate section, for the purpose of serving the Chinon area. Its personnel were assigned from the American Expeditionary Forces at large and averaged 3 medical officers and 21 enlisted men. It was located in a modern château, about one-half mile from Avoine, and had a bed capacity of 80. The château was well equipped with baths, laundry, and a lighting plant, and was situated on 25 acres of open ground. Camp Hospital No. 56 functioned until January 14, 1919, when it was abandoned and the personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.
 

FIG. 161.-One of the buildings, Camp Hospital No. 56, Avoine

 

xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 55, A. E. F.," Ferrieres, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 56, A. E. F.," Avoine, by Capt. John E. McQuain, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



775

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 57z

Camp Hospital No. 57 was established in August, 1918, at St. Amand Mont Rond, Department Cher, intermediate section, to care for the sick and wounded of the 3d Depot Division. It was located in portion of the French hospital of that city and occupied two 10-bed wards and four 2-bed rooms. Through the courtesy of the sisters in charge of the hospital the operating room was available for emergency use. The personnel came from Field Hospital No. 303. On September 1, 1918, the hospital was moved to a building which formerly had been a private school, accommodating about 150 patients. Twelve beds for acute surgical cases were reserved at the French hospital and all operations were performed at the latter institution. The number of patients averaged from 120 to 160. The 3d Depot Division was discontinued about November 1, 1918, and the personnel of the hospital were skeletonized to 1 officer and 12 enlisted men. It continued to function until January 31, 1919, when it was closed and the personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 59a

Camp Hospital No. 59 was established August 21, 1918, at Issoudun, Department Indre, intermediate section, by casual personnel. It occupied the buildings of the École Sacré Coeur, a school for boys, a large four-story building with a large park. Prior to its occupation by Camp Hospital No. 59, this building had been used by the French Hôpital Complémentaire No. 43. Many improvements and repairs were required as there were no baths of any kind, the lighting facilities were uncertain, and sanitary appliances were inadequate. The capacity was 600 beds. Patients were received first on September 8, 1918, and during its existence the hospital admitted a total of 1,404 surgical and medical cases. Three convoys of patients were received from the advanced areas by hospital trains; the largest number of patients in hospital was 580, September 20, 1918. During September, 1918, when the admission rate was at its height, Field Hospital No. 156 was assigned to Camp Hospital No. 59 for temporary duty. On February 18, 1919, all patients were transferred to Base Hospital No. 63, at Chateauroux, and the hospital ceased operating on that date. Its personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 61b

Camp Hospital No. 61 was organized in August 1918 at Poitiers, Department Vienne, intermediate section; its personnel were assigned from the American Expeditionary Forces, at large. It was located in the Ancienne Seminaire, which had been occupied by the French Hôpital Temporaire No. 16, and was taken over with its entire equipment on August 28, 1918. On September 18,
 

zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 57, A. E. F.," St. Amand Mont Rond, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 59, A. E. F.," Issoudun, by Maj. Charles O. Boswell, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 61, A. E. F.," Poitiers, by First Lieut. John E. Treivweiler, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



776

a part of the École de Théologie, then occupied by Hôpital Temporaire No. 21, was taken over, bringing the normal bed capacity of the entire hospital up to 480. Patients were received first on September 22, 1918, and the first hospital train arrived on November 5, 1918, with 471 battle casualties. On that date the designation of Camp Hospital No. 61 was changed to Base Hospital No. 218. The institution functioned as a base hospital until February 13, 1919, when its status was again changed to that of Camp Hospital No. 61, whereupon the greater part of the plant was discontinued and the buildings were returned to the French; the bed capacity was reduced to 75. The hospital was officially closed on May 28, 1919, its personnel sailed from Brest June 26, 1919, on the Noordam, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y.
 

FIG. 162.-Camp Hospital No. 59, Issoudun

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 62c

Camp Hospital No. 62 was organized in August, 1918, at Sancerre, Department Cher, intermediate section. Its personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in the hotel Pont du Jour, a four-story, steam-heated and electrically lighted structure of 125-bed capacity, and served the 4th Depot Division. In addition to the hospital at Sancerre, two auxiliary hospitals were opened about the middle of August, 1918, one at Veaugues, operated by Field Hospital No. 338, and one at Cosne, operated by Field Hospital No. 339. These auxiliary hospitals were intended
 

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 62, A. E. F.," Sancerre, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



777

for the treatment of infectious diseases only. Total number of patients treated by Camp Hospital No. 62 was 841. It ceased to operate on November 1, 1918, and its personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 64d

Camp Hospital No. 64 was established in August, 1918, at Chatillon, Department Côte d'Or, advance section, and occupied a type B, 300-bed unit. The enlisted personnel was assigned from Sanitary Squads Nos. 54 and 63, replaced later by casuals. It was opened for the reception of patients on September 26, 1918. Camp Hospital No. 64 served the twelfth training area, then occupied by the 81st Division; during its existence it received 1,340 medical and surgical cases. The hospital ceased operating May 20, 1919, and the personnel sailed for New York from St. Nazaire June 14, 1919, on the Santa Barbara.
 

FIG. 163.-Camp Hospital No. 64, Chatillon-sur-Seine

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 65e

Camp Hospital No. 65 was established in October, 1918, at Semur, Department Côte d'Or, advance section, and was operated by personnel from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in a type B, 300-bed unit and served the twenty-first training area, then occupied by the 78th Division. The hospital received both surgical and medical cases; the first patients were admitted November 17, 1918. Since the operating room and surgical wards were not opened until December 3, 1918, prior to that time all surgical cases had to be transferred to Base Hospital No. 17 at Dijon. Camp Hospital No. 65 ceased to function May 8, 1919; its personnel sailed May 30, 1919, from Marseille on the Madonta and were demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., June 24, 1919.
 

dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 64, A. E. F.," Chatillon, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 65, A. E. F.," Semur, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



778

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 66f

Camp Hospital No. 66 came into existence in August, 1918, when the infirmary, Camp St. Sulpice, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, was designated Camp Hospital No. 66. Personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. At this time, the hospital operated in several wooden barracks and tents. In November, 1918, a new hospital having been completed, was taken over by Camp Hospital No. 66. It consisted of 28 barrack wards of corrugated iron, finished inside with beaver board and wood, and accommodated 400 patients. It served the Libourne area, then occupied by United States Engineers, a labor battalion, and prisoners of war. The total population of the camp was approximately 10,000. The hospital ceased to function June 9, 1919. The personnel sailed from Bordeaux June 19, 1919, on the Infanta Isabella, arrived at Camp Merritt, N. J., June 30, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., shortly afterward.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 67g

Camp Hospital No. 67 was established in November, 1918, at Chemilly, Department Yonne, advance section, and was operated by personnel taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. On December 12, 1918, Field Hospital No. 42, with its full equipment, was attached for duty. The hospital was housed in several wooden barracks and served the nineteenth training area. Patients were received first on December 23, 1918. There were but very few troops stationed in the area served by this hospital and the maximum number of patients in hospital at any one time was 29. It ceased to function March 25, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 68h

Camp Hospital No. 68 was established September 18, 1918, at Bourges, Department Cher, intermediate section, and was operated by personnel taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied a part of the Collége de Jeunes Filles, an old three-story stone building, which formerly had been used by the French as a hospital. Later, another three-story building was taken over and operated as an annex to Camp Hospital No. 68. The hospital was well equipped, and its normal bed capacity was 350, with emergency expansion to 400. It was established for the care of the personnel at the central records office and postal express service, which included 500 British female employees (W. A. A. C.)

It ceased to function June 12, 1919; the personnel sailed from Brest July 1, 1919, on the President Grant and were demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., July 13, 1919.
 

fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 66, A. E. F.," St. Sulpice, by Lieut. Col. O. W. Pinkston, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 67, A. E. F.," Chemilly by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 68, A. E. F.," Bourges, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



779

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 70i

Camp Hospital No. 70 was established in September, 1918, at St. Florent sur Cher, Department Cher, intermediate section, and was operated for a time by Field Hospital No. 156. It was located in an old factory building of 300-bed capacity and served the 5th Depot Division, Field Hospital No. 156 was relieved from duty at the hospital, January 13, 1919, and was replaced by a detachment of casuals. On January 25, 1919, all patients were evacuated to Camp Hospital No. 59 at Issoudun, and the hospital ceased operating January 31, 1919. The personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.
 

FIG. 164.-Camp Hospital No. 68, Bourges

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 72j

Camp Hospital No. 72 was established September 26, 1918, at Chateau-du-Loir, Department Sarthe, intermediate section, by personnel taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. When first organized, it occupied four rooms in the Hôtel de la Gar, but on October 11, 1918, it was moved to the École Primarie Supérieure des Garcons. The school was a modern, three-

 

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 70, A. E. F.," St. Florent, by Capt. Harry C. Fulton, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 72, A. E. F.," Chateau-du-Loir, by the commanding officer of that  hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


780

story building of 26 rooms, well adapted for hospital purposes, and had a bed capacity of 300. The hospital served the Quartermaster Department depot at Chateau-du-Loir and miscellaneous troops in that area. Camp Hospital No. 72 ceased to function May 14, 1919; part of its personnel and all supplies were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 114 at Ecommoy. The remaining personnel sailed from Brest, June 25, 1919, on the Seattle, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 9, 1919.
 

FIG. 165.-Camp Hospital No. 72, Chateau-du-Loir

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 73k

Camp Hospital No. 73 was organized October 1, 1918, at Le Blanc, Department Indre, intermediate section, for the purpose of caring for the sick of the Field Artillery motor training camp there. It was established in the building of the Collége des Garcons, in which there were adequate and ample facilities for wards and quarters for the personnel. The personnel came from casuals arriving overseas late in 1918. The total number of patients admitted was 150. The hospital was closed January 8, 1919, and its personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.
 

kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 73, A. E. F.," Le Blanc, by Maj. George H. Stagner, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



781

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 75l

Camp Hospital No. 75 was established October 5, 1918, at Loches, Department Indre et Loire, intermediate section. Its personnel came from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in the buildings of the normal school of Loches, and was of 300-bed capacity. The school was suitable for hospital purposes and consisted of three separate buildings, all equipped with modern sanitary fixtures, and running hot and cold water. The hospital functioned until November 21, 1918, when it was closed and its personnel were reassigned to other stations for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 76m

Camp Hospital No. 76 began about March 1, 1918, as a small regimental infirmary of the 501st Engineers, located at Mehun sur Yevre, Department Cher, intermediate section. At that time the entire infirmary was housed in one Adrian barrack. Early in October, 1918, construction of the hospital was begun by the 501st Engineers and it was completed within the month. When completed, the hospital consisted of 10 barracks, all connected by a closed corridor, and accommodated 150 patients. Tents also were erected from time to time and the bed capacity of the hospital could be expanded to 300 beds. The hospital served approximately 7,000 troops located in various camps in that area. During its existence it cared for 2,936 medical and 123 surgical cases. Camp Hospital No. 76 ceased operating June 10, 1919, and its personnel, with the exception of one officer and three enlisted men, was reassigned to other stations for duty. The skeletonized Camp Hospital No. 76 returned to the United States, sailing from St. Nazaire June 23, 1919.

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 77n

Camp Hospital No. 77 was established in October, 1918, at Montmorillon, Department Vienne, intermediate section, by personnel from the medical replacement unit No. 37. It was located in a school for boys, the Seminaire Cardinal Pie, which was quite suitable for hospital purposes. The hospital with a bed capacity of 200, served the Montmorillon training area. As there were no civilian doctors in the village of Montmorillon, the medical officers at the hospital held daily sick call for the civilian population in the surrounding area. During the existence of this hospital, approximately 500 medical and surgical cases were cared for. It ceased to operate November 28, 1918, when all remaining patients were transferred to Base Hospital No. 28, at Limoges. The personnel were reassigned to other medical organizations for further duty.
 

lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 75, A. E. F.," Loches, by Capt. C. H. Courtney, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 76, A. E. F.," Mehun sur Yevre, by Maj. John C. O'Connor, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 77, A. E. F.," Montmorillon, by Capt. Frederick C. Warfel, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



782

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 78o

Camp Hospital No. 78 came into existence October 2, 1918, when the designation of Camp Hospital No. 54, at Beaulieu, Department Dordogne, base section No. 2, was changed to that of Camp Hospital No. 78. On that date Field Hospital No. 333 took over and operated the hospital. The normal bed capacity was 150, but during the epidemic of influenza in October, 1918, 6 ward tents, capacity of about 20 cots each, were erected on the hospital grounds for convalescent patients. The hospital ceased to function with the departure of the 84th Division on November 30, 1918, and its personnel was reassigned. During its existence, 756 cases were admitted, including patients cared for by Camp Hospital No. 54 (q. v.).

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 79p

Camp Hospital No. 79 was opened on October 22, 1918, at St. Andre de Cubzac, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, and was the outgrowth of the infirmary, headquarters detachment of the 86th Division. It was located in the Château du Bouilh, an old structure built in the sixteenth century, and accommodated 90 patients. In addition to the building, three ward tents were erected on the lawn of the château, making the total bed capacity 150. An operating room was equipped to care for emergency surgery, and several major operations were performed; 713 medical and surgical cases were admitted during the existence of the hospital. Camp Hospital No. 79 served the east Bordeaux area, which was occupied by troops awaiting entrance to the Bordeaux embarkation camp. It ceased to function May 21, 1919, and its personnel were transferred to other stations.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 82q

Camp Hospital No. 82 was organized on October 29, 1918, at Le Havre, base section No. 4, and operated by personnel taken from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was established for the care of troops passing through the port of Le Havre and occupied the Hotel Frascati, a large modern building, composed of three wings, inclosing a large court. This building had been used as a hospital by the French ever since the outbreak of the war in 1914. It was well suited for hospital purposes and accommodated about 400 patients. Patients were received first on November 15, 1918; during its activity this institution cared for 1,771 medical and surgical cases. The hospital operated until April 30, 1919, when it was closed and the personnel were reassigned to other hospitals for duty.
 

oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 78, A. E. F.," Beaulieu, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 79, A. E. F.," St. Andre de Cubzac, by Capt. Edward J. Strickler, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 82, A. E. F.," Le Havre, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



783

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 85r

Camp Hospital No. 85 was organized on November 8, 1918, at Montoir, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1, and was the outgrowth of the former infirmary of that camp. The construction of the hospital was completed during the month of November, 1918, and consisted of 28 wooden barracks of 400-bed capacity. It served the Pont Chateau area and supply depot; the majority of patients received were cases of contagious and infectious diseases. Total number of patients treated in hospital from August, 1918, to February 28, 1919, was 2,540. On June 6, 1919 Camp Hospital No. 85 reverted to its former status, its personnel remaining on duty there.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 87s

Camp Hospital No. 87 was established about October 1, 1918, at Cour Cheverny, Department Loir et Cher. It was located in the Château Chautreiul, with a total bed capacity of about 100, and its function was to care for the sick of the Signal Corps replacement area. Personnel were drawn largely from the attached medical personnel of the signal battalions. The hospital ceased operating on February 17, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 91t

Camp Hospital No. 91 was established in October, 1918, at La Boule, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1, by personnel from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It occupied 5 hotels whose total bed capacity was 800. All of the buildings were modern, electrically lighted, and were suitable for hospital purposes. La Boule is a seaside summer resort and the climate, except during November and December, is delightful; the hospital was used principally as a convalescent home and received patients from base and camp hospitals in base section No. 1. After January 2, 1919, Camp Hospital No. 91 functioned as a centralization point for the Army Nurse Corps under orders to return to the United States. It ceased to receive patients on February 20, 1919, and was officially closed April 30, 1919. The personnel were reassigned to other stations for further duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 92u

Camp Hospital No. 92 came into existence October 26, 1918, when the designation of Convalescent Hospital No. 3, at Quiberon, Department Morbihan, base section No. 1, was changed to Camp Hospital No. 92. It occupied 11 summer hotels, with a capacity of 990 beds. Patients received by this hospital were largely convalescent wounded and gassed cases. The institution functioned as a camp hospital until November 18, 1918, on which date its designation was again changed to that of Base Hospital No. 236.

 


rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 85, A. E. F.," Montoir, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 87, A. E. F.," Cour Cheverny, by Maj. A. H. Dunn, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 91, A. E. F.," La Boule by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 92, A. E. F.," Quiberon, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



784

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 93v

Camp Hospital No. 93 was organized October 29, 1918, at Clamecy, Department Nievre, intermediate section, for the care of patients from the Third Army Corps schools. When first established the hospital was located in three French houses of a total bed capacity of 250. In December, 1918, the French evacuated their Hospital Temporaire No. 3, located in the school for girls, and this building with two barracks in the rear were obtained for Camp Hospital No. 93. The school building, though well equipped, was in a bad state of repair and required considerable renovating before it could satisfactorily be used. During its existence 1,359 surgical and medical cases were admitted. The hospital ceased operating April 15, 1919, and was replaced by the infirmary, Third Army Corps. The personnel returned to the United States by way of Brest, sailing on the President Grant May 28, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 94w

Camp Hospital No. 94 was established in November, 1918, at Aytre, Department Charent Inferieure, base section No. 7, its personnel coming from Camp Hospitals Nos. 88 and 69. It was located in a 2-story wooden barrack, 65-bed capacity, constructed by the 35th United States Engineers, which organization it served. This hospital treated only slightly sick, all cases requiring special attention being transferred to Camp Hospital No. 39, at La Rochelle. Patients were admitted first on December 21, 1918. Two hundred and four were received. From March 8, 1919, to its closing on April 9, 1919, it was used as a venereal disease hospital. Upon its closing, the personnel were reassigned to other stations for further duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 95x

Camp Hospital No. 95 was organized in November, 1918, at Verneuil, Department Nievre, intermediate section, and served the Verneuil area. At the beginning it occupied 3 barracks of about 80-bed capacity; in January, 1919, it moved into a new plant consisting of 7 barracks of 108-bed capacity. The facilities at first were very limited, so medical cases only were kept in the hospital, all surgical cases being transferred to the hospital center at Mars, a distance of about 18 miles. The hospital ceased operating on June 10, 1919; its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire June 27, 1919, on the Kentuckian, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 13, 1919.
 

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 93, A. E. F.," Clamecy, by Maj. Joseph H. Sayer, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 94, A. E. F.," Aytre, by Capt. Hugh B. Sprague, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 95, A. E. F.," Verneuil, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



785

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 96y

Camp Hospital No. 96 was organized November 4, 1918, at Angers, Department Maine et Loire, base section No. 1, its personnel coming from Camp Hospital No. 86. It occupied the Ecole Normale, a three-story school building of masonry construction, well adapted for hospital purposes and capable of accommodating 250 to 300 beds. It did not have any surgical or special service facilities, all cases requiring these being transferred to Base Hospital No. 27, also stationed at Angers. The hospital was established to serve troops in the district of Angers, but with the cessation of hostilities the necessity for this hospital ceased and on January 12, 1919, it was abandoned, and the personnel reassigned to other stations for duty. During the period of its operation it cared for 457 medical cases.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 97z

Camp Hospital No. 97 was organized in October, 1918, at St. Dizier, Department Haute Marne, advance section, and was the outgrowth of the American regulating station infirmary at St. Dizier. It was established in several wooden barracks of 106-bed capacity and served the local troops and casuals passing through the regulating station. Patients were received first on November 15, 1918. The hospital ceased to function May 8, 1919; its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire on June 16, 1919, on the Santa Paula, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 6, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 100a

Camp Hospital No. 100 was organized in November, 1918, at Belfort, in the advance section, and was operated by Evacuation Hospital No. 28. It was located in a group of buildings, the Caserne Rathenaus de Belfort, formerly used by a French artillery regiment. The group included 30 large buildings, constructed of reinforced concrete, with tile floors, electric lights, modern plumbing, and steam heat, and accommodated 2,000 patients. The group covered about 12 acres and was surrounded by a high stone wall. This hospital was located close to the Alsace border and received and cared for ex-prisoners of war, both American and British, picking them up at rail ends and transporting them by trucks and ambulances to the hospital. The majority of patients were medical cases; of these 955 were received, including 521 ex-British prisoners. The hospital ceased to operate January 2, 1919, and Evacuation Hospital No. 28 proceeded with all its property to Nantes for duty.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 101b

Camp Hospital No. 101 was established in December, 1918, at Auvours, about 8 miles from Le Mans, Department Sarthe, intermediate section, and
 

yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 96, A. E. F.," Angers, by Maj. W. E. Stewart, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 97, A. E. F," St. Dizier, by Maj. E. L. Martindale, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 100, A. E. F.," Belfort, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 101, A. E. F.," Auvours, by Maj. Louis J. C. Bailey, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.



786

served the 2d Depot Division. The plant consisted of a number of wooden barracks and tents and was of 1,100-bed capacity. It was operated by the personnel of Evacuation Hospital No. 11. The hospital, with the exception of pneumonia and influenza cases, cared for medical cases of a more or less minor degree. No surgical work was undertaken, all surgical cases and cases requiring special care were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 52, at Le Mans. The largest daily admission was 138 cases; 526 was the greatest number of patients in hospital at any one time. The hospital ceased to operate in June, 1919; its personnel returned to the United States, sailing from St. Nazaire June 29, 1919, on the Susquehanna and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 17, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 102c

Camp Hospital No. 102 was established on December 18, 1918, at Virelade, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces at large. It was located in the Château Virelade, an unoccupied; large château about 25 miles southeast of Bordeaux, and served the La Brede billeting area, which was occupied successively by the 34th, 40th, 82d, and 78th Divisions. Patients were admitted first on December 18, 1918, and up to April 30, 1919. The hospital received a total of 802 surgical and medical cases. Camp Hospital No. 102 ceased to operate May 16, 1919; its personnel returned to the United States, sailing from Bordeaux on the Iowan June 10, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 103d

Camp Hospital No. 103 was established January 14, 1919, at the embarkation camp at Pauillac, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, in a small hospital formerly used by the United States Navy. It consisted of five small stone buildings, each having a capacity of about 49 patients. In addition to the permanent buildings, several wooden barracks were erected, bringing the total capacity of the hospital up to 471 beds. During its existence the hospital cared for 2,153 patients, the majority of whom were medical cases. It ceased to operate May 31, 1919, and its personnel returned to the United States.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 104e

Camp Hospital No. 104 was established on February 5, 1919, at Lussac, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, its personnel coming from the American Expeditionary Forces, at large. It was located in the Château Terrien, a partially occupied château about one-half mile north of the village of Lussac. The building contained 30 rooms, 2 inside flush-type toilets, with drains leading into cesspools; a large tank on the third floor, with plumbing in fairly good condition, furnished the château with water. Camp Hospital No. 104 was
 

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 102, A. E. F.," Virelade, by Capt. Francis P. Richards, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 103, A. E. F.," Pauillac, by Lieut. Col. M. A. Dailey, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division,  S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 104, A. E. F.," Lussac, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



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established to care for the sick and injured of the Libourne billeting area, occupied by troops awaiting transportation to the United States. The area covered about 16 square miles and the sick were collected by two ambulances making regular morning rounds to infirmaries in the towns of the area. Patients were received first on February 20, 1919, and the hospital functioned until May 2, 1919, on which date all patients were transferred to Bordeaux. The personnel returned to the United States, sailing from Bordeaux on June 10, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 105f

Camp Hospital No. 105, was established February 6, 1919, at Salleboeuf, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, to serve the eastern Bordeaux training area, then occupied by troops awaiting transportation to the United States. It was located in the Château St. Regis, and with the addition of several tents had a capacity of 200 beds. Patients were admitted first on February 11, 1919, and the hospital functioned until April 30, 1919, when all remaining patients were transferred to Base Hospital No. 208 at Bordeaux.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 106g

Camp Hospital No. 106 was established February 4, 1919, at Blaye, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, to serve troops in the Bordeaux area. The contiguous area was not occupied and the hospital was closed on May 3, 1919. During its existence only 14 patients were admitted.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 107h

Camp Hospital No. 107 came into existence March 1, 1919, when Base Hospital No. 77 at Beaune, Department Côte d 'Or, advance section, was designated Camp Hospital No. 107. It was established in the buildings of Base Hospital No. 77 and served the American Expeditionary Force University at Beaune. When taken over, it contained 635 patients. Its capacity was 1,000 which later was reduced to 300. During its existence 813 medical and 394 surgical cases were admitted. The hospital ceased to operate in June, 1919; its personnel returned to the United States, sailing from Brest, June 27, 1919, on the Manitou, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 9, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 108i

Camp Hospital No. 108 was organized March 1, 1919, at Allerey, Department Saone et Loire, intermediate section, for the purpose of serving the farm school subpost, American Expeditionary Force University, Allerey. It was organized from the personnel of Base Hospital No. 97 and took over the
 

fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 105, A. E. F.," Salleboeuf, by Maj. F. H. Hurst, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division,  S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 106, A. E. F.," Blaye, by Maj. John S. Sweeney, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division,  S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 107, A. E. F.," Beaune, by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
iThe statements of fact herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 108, A. E. F.," Allerey, by Maj. Thomas W. Grayson, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division,  S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



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patients and plant of the latter unit. During its two months of operation it admitted 1,306 surgical and medical cases. The hospital ceased to operate May 28, 1919, and its personnel returned to the United States on the Leviathan, sailing from Brest June 29, 1919. Demobilization of the unit took place July 12, 1919, at Camp Bowie, Tex.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 109j

Camp Hospital No. 109 was established February 27, 1919, at Camp Montierchaum, Department Indre, intermediate section, to serve troops in that camp and vicinity. It operated in a group of several barrack-type buildings of 450-bed capacity, and was built on a low flat piece of land directly to the northwest of Camp Montierchaum. For convenience of construction of buildings and general appearance this site was excellent, but the problem of drainage was very difficult. All classes of patients were admitted and cared for. The hospital ceased to operate as a camp hospital on June 12, 1919, on which date its designation was changed to camp infirmary, Camp Montierchaum. The larger portion of the officers and enlisted men were transferred to other organizations for duty, and a skeletonized Camp Hospital No. 109, consisting of 1 officer and 4 enlisted men, was returned to the United States, sailing on the Madowiska, June 28, 1919, from St. Nazaire, and was demobilized at Camp Jackson, S. C., on July 12, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 110k

Camp Hospital No. 110 was established in February, 1919, at La Suze, Department Sarthe, intermediate section, for the care of troops in the Le Mans embarkation center. It was operated by Field Hospital No. 122 and Sanitary Train 106. The hospital occupied 15 wooden barracks and had a normal bed capacity of 350. The site on which the hospital was located was low and drainage was difficult. Because the water supply was unsatisfactory a motorized filtering and treating plant was installed. The hospital ceased to function June 10, 1919; its personnel sailed for the United States from St. Nazaire June 24, 1919, on the Pocahontas, and were demobilized at Camp Gordon, Ga., July 8, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 111l

Camp Hospital No. 111 came into existence March 1, 1919, when the personnel of Field Hospital No. 123 was transferred to Solesmes, Department Sarthe, intermediate section, to take over the care of 200 of our patients in the French Hôspital Temporaire No. 38, at that place. Camp Hospital No. 111 occupied four floors in the abbey of the Benedictines at Solesmes. The 

jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 109, A. E. F.," Camp Montierchaum, by Maj. Wayne H. Crum, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 110, A. E. F.," La Suze, by Maj. George A. O'Connell, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 111, A. E. F.," Solesmes, by Maj. Cornelius F. Holton, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
 



789

portion of the building taken over was modern and excellently suited to hospital purposes. The floors were divided into rooms, each room large enough to accommodate five patients. The entire building was well lighted by electricity; heat was furnished by a central heating plant and distributed in all rooms through radiators. The hospital cared for troops in the Sable area, then occupied by the 77th Division; during its operation it cared for 1,538 medical and surgical cases. It ceased to operate May 15, 1919; its personnel were returned to the United States and demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., June 30, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 118m

Camp Hospital No. 118 came into existence April 10, 1919, when the Medical Department, United States Army, took over and operated what was until then United States Naval Base Hospital No. 1 at Brest. Camp Hospital No. 118 functioned from April 10, 1919, to August 15, 1919, and during that time admitted 1,301 medical and 500 surgical cases.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 120n

Camp Hospital No. 120 was established in April, 1919, at Le Mans, Department Sarthe, intermediate section, and served the forwarding camp at that station. The personnel was taken from Mobile Hospital No. 3, when that organization was disbanded on April 4, 1919. The hospital was located in a type A, 500-bed unit, and when first authorized was intended for a base hospital. Admissions to this hospital were very light, as practically all surgical and serious medical cases were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 52 at Le Mans. The hospital was in active operation two months, and during that time it cared for approximately 400 patients. It ceased to function June 11, 1919; its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire July 5, 1919, on the South Bend and were demobilized at Camp Gordon, Ga., July 22, 1919.

 CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 121o

Camp Hospital No. 121 came into existence June 3, 1919, when American Red Cross Hospital No. 3, at Paris, was taken over by the Army Medical Department, and designated Camp Hospital No. 121. The buildings were situated in very attractive park grounds where also barracks had been erected to house the enlisted personnel. The capacity of the hospital was 200, but the number of patients in hospital never exceeded 130. Approximately 18 per cent of the patients at all times were American welfare workers and officers of the allied armies. Camp Hospital No. 121 ceased to function December 8, 1919; the majority of its personnel were assigned for duty with the Army of occupation, and the remainder returned to the United States.
 

mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 118, A. E. F.," Brest, by Capt. Otto C. Hirsch, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 120, A. E. F.," Le Mans, by Col. Henry C. Coe, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 121, A. E. F.," Paris, by Maj. L. O. Tarleton. M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division,  S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


790

CAMP HOSPITAL NO. 122p

Camp Hospital No. 122 was established April 26, 1919, at Antwerp, Belgium, base section No. 9, to care for our troops in Belgium and Holland. With the exception of small infirmaries in Brussels and Rotterdam, Camp Hospital No. 122 was our only hospital in base section No. 9. It was the last hospital to be established with the American Expeditionary Forces. It was located in a large five-story building that formerly had been a seamen's home and was quite suitable for hospital purposes. It had almost unlimited capacity, but only 350 beds were set up, with same number in reserve. Complete surgical equipment was also on hand. The hospital functioned about 11 weeks, and during that time treated approximately 250 surgical and medical cases. It ceased operating July 16, 1919; its personnel sailed from Brest, August 19, 1919, on the Troy, and were demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., August 24, 1919.

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Camp Hospital No. 122, A. E. F." Antwerp, Belgium, by Maj. William J. Jones, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.

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