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Chapter XXIV

Contents

CHAPTER XXIV

BASE HOSPITALSa

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 1b

Base Hospital No. 1 was organized in September, 1916, at the Bellevue Hospital, New York City. The unit was mobilized on November 21, 1917, at the 12th Regiment Armory, New York City, where it remained in training until February 26, 1918, on which date it left New York on the Olympic, arriving in Liverpool, England, March 6, 1918. It left Liverpool March 6 for Southampton, England, where officers and enlisted men remained in the rest camp for three days prior to crossing to Le Havre, France, March 10, 1918. It left Le Havre March 11 en route to Vichy, Department Allier, in the intermediate section, A. E. F., where it arrived March 12, 1918. Upon arrival at Vichy Base Hospital No. 1 took possession of nine hotels that had been used by the French as hospitals since 1914, and on March 20, 1918, reported that the hospital was ready to receive patients. The first patients, 252 French wounded, arrived on April 9, and the first American patients, 358 in number, were admitted April 11, 1918.

Base Hospital No. 1 functioned from April 9, 1918, to January 20, 1919, during which time 8,142 surgical and 7,481 medical cases were treated. During this period the unit maintained 12 separate messes and occupied over 20 hotels in which sick and wounded were cared for. The unit left Vichy March 5, 1919, en route to St. Nazaire, for return to the United States; it sailed April 14, 1919, on the Princess Matoika, and arrived in Newport News, Va., April 27, 1919, where, at Camp Hill, the unit was demobilized.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Walter D. Webb, M. C., October 16, 1917, to August 24, 1918.
    Maj. Joseph McKee, M. C., August 25, 1918, to September 24, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Arthur W. Wright, M. C., September 25, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Richard T. Atkins, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. George B. Wallace, M. C.

aOnly those base hospitals which operated as such in France are included in this chapter. This will account for the absence of certain numbers in the series.-Ed.
bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 1, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Arthur M. Wright, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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BASE HOSPITAL NO. 2c

Base Hospital No. 2 was organized at the Presbyterian Hospital, New York City, during February, 1917. The unit was mobilized in May, 1917. It sailed from New York on the St. Louis, on May 12, 1917, and arrived in England on May 23, 1917. Upon arrival in England the unit was attached to No. 1 General Hospital, British Expeditionary Force, at Etretat, France, arriving at that station on June 2, 1917, where it remained until January, 1919. The organization sailed from Europe aboard the Agamemnon, March 3, 1919, arrived in the United States March 11, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Meade, Md., February 17, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Lucius L. Hopwood, M. C., May 9, 1917, to January, 1918.
    Col. William Darrach, M. C., January, 1918, to July 19, 1918.
    Maj. Willard B. Soper, M. C., July 20, 1918, to demobilization.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 3d

Base Hospital No. 3 was organized in September, 1916, at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City. It was called into active service November 14, 1917, the entire command being mustered into service by November 21, 1917. The armory of the First Field Hospital, National Guard of New York, New York City, was selected as the mobilization and training center. The nurses were mobilized January 15, 1918, at Ellis Island, N. Y. The unit remained in training at the armory until February 6, 1918, when it embarked on the Lapland, leaving New York the same date. The Lapland arrived in Halifax on February 8, and left for Europe on February 13, 1918, reaching Glasgow, Scotland, February 25, 1918. The nurses of Base Hospital No. 3 were detached from the unit at Glasgow, and sent by way of London to the casual depot at Blois, France, and rejoined the unit April 18, 1918. The officers and enlisted men proceeded to Southampton, England, arriving on February 26, 1918. On the following day they crossed the English Channel on H. M. S. Hunslet, arriving at Le Havre, France, February 28, 1918. The officers and enlisted men left Le Havre March 1, 1918, by train en route to Vauclaire, Department of Dordogne, base section No. 2, their permanent station, arriving there March 3, 1918.

An old monastery, comprising numerous cement buildings, was turned over to Base Hospital No. 3. In two months' time these had been converted to hospital purposes, later being expanded to a hospital of 2,800-bed capacity. The first patients arrived May 13, 1918, Hospital Train No. 53 bringing 104 patients from Base Hospital No. 9, Chateauroux. The railroad station was 2½ miles from the hospital, but as ample motor transportation had been provided, evacuation of trains was never delayed. During its activity, May 13, 1918, to January 20, 1919, Base Hospital No. 3 cared for 9,127 patients, surgical and medical. This hospital was designated by the chief surgeon, A. E. F., as

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 2, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed. dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 3, A. E. F.," by Maj. George Baehr, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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one of the hospitals to receive cases of suspected pulmonary tuberculosis, 222 such cases being admitted during its period of activity. The largest number of patients in hospital was November 5, 1918, when 2,765 sick and wounded were being treated.

Base Hospital No. 3 ceased to function as a hospital on January 20, 1919, having been relieved on that date by Base Hospital No. 71. The unit of Base Hospital No. 3 left Vauclaire on March 7, 1919, and proceeded by rail to the Beau Desert hospital center, to await transportation to the United States. It sailed on the Pastores, March 14, 1919, and arrived at Newport News, Va., March 26, 1919. The entire unit was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., on April 4, 1919.

FIG. 125.-Base Hospital No. 3, Vauclaire

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Michael A. Dailey, M. C., August 23, 1917, to October 17, 1918.
    Maj. Herbert L. Celler, M. C., October 18, 1918, to October 21, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. George Baehr, M. C., October 22, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Howard Lillienthal, M. C.
    Maj. John W. Means, M. C.
    Maj. Walter M. Brickner, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Herbert L. Celler, M. C.


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BASE HOSPITAL NO. 4e

Base Hospital No. 4 was organized at Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, during August, 1916, and was mobilized at Cleveland about May 5, 1917. The unit left Cleveland on May 6, 1917, arrived at New York and embarked on the Orduna May 7, 1917. It sailed for Europe on May 8, 1917, arriving at Liverpool May 17, thus being the first unit of the United States Army to reach Europe. After spending several days in London, it left there on May 24, en route to Rouen, France, arriving at that station for duty on May 25, 1917. It was one of the original six base hospitals sent to Europe for duty with the British and remained with the British Expeditionary Force in France during its entire overseas existence, operating as No. 9 General Hospital, British Expeditionary Force. It ceased functioning about March 1, 1919, sailed from Europe on the Agamemnon on March 31, arrived in the United States on April 7, 1919, and was demobilized shortly thereafter.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Harry L. Gilchrist, M. C., May 3, 1917, to December 14, 1917.
    Lieut. Col. William E. Lower, M. C., December 15, 1917, to April 30, 1918.
    Capt. Allen Graham, M. C., May 1, 1918, to September 17, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Frank E. Bunts, M. C., September 18, 1918, to demobilization.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 5f

Base Hospital No.5 was organized in February, 1916, at the Harvard University, and was mobilized in May, 1917. The unit left New York May 11, 1917, on the Saxonia and arrived at Falmouth, England, May 22, 1917, and at Boulogne, France on May 30, 1917. It was assigned to the British Expeditionary Force in France and was ordered to take over British General Hospital No. 11. This hospital was situated between the towns of Dannes and Camiers, Department Pas de Calais. It functioned there until November 1, 1917, when it was transferred to Boulogne sur Mer, where it took over and operated British General Hospital No. 13.

While at Dannes-Camiers, Base Hospital No. 5 frequently was attacked by enemy aircraft, and on the night of September 4, 1917, suffered several casualties. Lieut. William T. Fitzsimons, M. C., was killed, Lieuts. Rae W. Whidden, Thaddeus D. Smith, and Clarence A. McGuire, M. C., were wounded. Lieutenants Whidden and Smith subsequently died. Three enlisted men were killed and five severely wounded; one nurse and twenty-two patients were wounded. These deaths were the first among the American Expeditionary Forces due to enemy activity.

The hospital occupied a large municipal building, the bed capacity of which was 650. During its activity, June 1, 1917, to January 20, 1919, this

eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 4, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed. fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 5, A. E. F.," by Maj. Henry Lyman, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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hospital cared for 45,837 patients, both surgical and medical. Of this number 41,015 were British and 4,822 Americans. The greatest number of patients admitted in one day was 964.

The unit was relieved from duty with the British on January 20, 1919, and sailed from Brest, France, April 7, 1919, on the Graf Waldersee, arriving at New York April 20, 1919. The unit was demobilized May 2, 1919, at Camp Devens, Mass.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Robert U. Patterson, M. C., May 5, 1917, to February 27, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Roger I. Lee, M. C., February 28, 1918, to September 6, 1918.
    Maj. Henry Lyman, M. C., September 7, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Roger I. Lee, M. C.
    Maj. Reginald Fitz, M. C.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Horace Binney, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 6g

Base Hospital No. 6 was organized in March, 1916, at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and was mobilized May 24, 1917, at Boston. It left there June 1, 1917, for Fort Strong, Mass., its training station, where it remained until July 8, 1917, when it proceeded to New York, embarking the next day on the Aurania. The entire unit sailed from New York July 9, 1917, arriving at Liverpool, England, July 24, 1917. It left Liverpool immediately by special train for Southampton, arriving there July 24, and sailed the same night for Le Havre, France, on the Australian hospital ship Warilda. It remained at Le Havre two days and proceeded, July 27, by rail to Bordeaux, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, A. E. F., its permanent station.

Upon arrival at Bordeaux, July 28, the unit occupied French Hôpital Complémentaire No. 25 (Petit Lycée de Bordeaux). A company of Engineers was assigned to the hospital for construction purposes, and work started September 8, 1917. A new kitchen, dining rooms, a warehouse, additional wards and barracks for officers, enlisted men, and nurses were built. Some of the buildings were not completed until June, 1918. The normal capacity of hospital was 3,000 beds, and with "crisis expansion" 3,898 beds and cots, including Red Cross huts and corridors. Patients first arrived August 21, 1917. The total number of patients treated, both surgical and medical, was 26,156, including 580 allied sick and wounded. The largest number of patients in hospital was on September 7, 1918, 3,134 then being cared for.

On January 14, 1919, Base Hospital No. 6, was relieved by Base Hospital No. 208, and ceased to function.

gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 6, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. W. L. Babcock, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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The unit of Base Hospital No. 6 was transferred March 5, 1919, to the Beau Desert hospital center, France, for transportation to the United States. It sailed on the Antigone from Bordeaux, March 12, 1919, en route to New York, arriving there March 24, 1919. After a delay of 12 days at Camp Merritt, N. J., the organization was transferred to Camp Devens, Mass., arriving there April 6, 1919, and was mustered out of the service April 9, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Frederick A. Washburn, M. C., May 29, 1917, to April 24, 1918.
    Col. Warren L. Babcock, M. C., April 25, 1918, to January 18, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Lincoln Davis, M. C., January 19, 1919, to demobilization.
 
CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Addison G. Branizer, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Col. Richard C. Cabot, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 7h

Base Hospital No. 7 was organized in December, 1916, at the Boston City Hospital, Boston. The unit was mobilized in February, 1918, at Camp Devens, Mass., where it remained in training until July 6, 1918, when it left Camp Devens. It sailed from New York July 8, 1918, on the Leviathan; arrived in Brest, France, July 15, 1918. After spending two weeks there it was ordered to Joue-les-Tours, Department Indre et Loire, for station. Upon arrival at Joue-les-Tours, July 30, 1918, Base Hospital No. 7 occupied one type A unit, constructed by the engineers. Base Hospital No. 7, with a convalescent camp, formed the Joue-les-Tours hospital center. The first convoy of sick and wounded was received on August 18, 1918; 3,518 surgical and medical cases were received by convoys during its activity. In addition, patients were treated from headquarters, Services of Supply, Tours.

On January 17, 1919, the hospital ceased to function, being on that date relieved by Base Hospital No. 120. The personnel of Base Hospital No. 7 left France from St. Nazaire March 14, 1919, on the Manchuria, and arrived at Camp Merritt, N. J., March 24, 1919. From Camp Merritt the unit was transferred to Camp Devens, Mass., and there mustered out of the service on April 14, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. A. M. Smith, M. C.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. E. H. Nichols, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John J. Thomas, M. C.
 

hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 7, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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BASE HOSPITAL NO. 8i

Base Hospital No. 8 was organized in November, 1916, at the Post-Graduate Hospital, New York City. The unit was mobilized at Fort Jay, N. Y., July 18, 1917. After 10 days of drilling and equipping the organization embarked July 29, 1917, on the Saratoga. On July 30, shortly after midday mess, the Saratoga, while at anchor in New York harbor, was rammed by the Panama, and so badly damaged that all passengers were disembarked and transported back to Governors Island. The unit lost most of its equipment and personal property on the Saratoga, but after a week of reequipping embarked again on August 7, 1917, and sailed the same date on the Finland.

FIG. 126.-Airplane view of Base Hospital No. 7, Joue-les-Tours.

The unit arrived at St. Nazaire, France, August 20, 1917, and next day took station at Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1. Base Hospital No. 8 was the first hospital to arrive at Savenay, and formed the nucleus of what was to be one of the largest and most important hospital centers in France. It occupied the normal school of Savenay, a large, white-stone building, which it transformed into a hospital. In addition to this a number of wooden buildings and storehouses were built by the engineers, so that the normal capacity of the hospital in November, 1918, was 2,460 beds. This hospital received both medical and surgical cases, but from August, 1918,

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 8, A. E. F.," by Lieut. L. G. Payson, S. C., while on duty as a memher of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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was devoted entirely to the reception and preparation of cases for evacuation to the United States.

The first patients were received September 22, 1917; 35,244 sick and wounded were cared for during its activity. Base Hospital No. 69 relieved Base Hospital No. 8 January 31, 1919, on which date Base Hospital No. 8 ceased to function. The unit of Base Hospital No. 8 was broken up in March, 1919, and sent to the United States in charge of convoys of patients, and was demobilized April 28, 1919, at Camp Lee, Va.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. J. F. Siler, M. C., July 17, 1917, to November 4, 1917.
    Col. W. E. Cooper, M. C., November 5, 1917, to October 10, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. R. J. Estill, M. C., October 11, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Col. Samuel Lloyd, M. C.
    Maj. C. G. Heyd, M. C.
    Maj. J. F. Connors, M. C.
    Maj. H. W. Orr, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. R. J. Estill, M. C.
    Maj. T. A. Martin, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 9j

Base Hospital No. 9 was organized in February, 1916, at the New York Hospital, New York City, and was mobilized July 21, 1917, at Governors Island, N. Y. After a short period of training the unit left New York August 7, 1917, on the Finland, and arrived at St. Nazaire, France, August 20, 1917. It remained at Savenay, quartered with Base Hospital No. 8, until September 1, 1917.

On September 2, the unit proceeded to Chateauroux, Department of Indre, in the intermediate section, its permanent station. The unit occupied a number of recently constructed buildings that had been intended for an insane asylum, but had been taken over and used by the French as a military hospital. After Base Hospital No. 9 occupied the buildings, a detachment of Engineers constructed a number of wooden wards and installed an X-ray plant. Later, when patients began to arrive in large numbers and more beds were required, the normal school of Chateauroux was taken over by the hospital. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,926 beds, but in emergency as many as 2,250 patients were treated at one time. Base Hospital No. 9 received both surgical and medical cases, but in the spring of 1918 was designated as an orthopedic hospital. An

jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 9 A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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18-acre farm was leased and operated by convalescent patients, which gave them a certain amount of useful training and at the same time supplied messes with staple vegetables and fresh pork. Though the first patient was admitted on September 15, 1917, the first hospital train of patients did not arrive until January 14, 1918. The hospital functioned from September 15, 1917, to January 13, 1919, when it was taken over by Base Hospital No. 63. During its activity 15,219 sick and wounded were taken care of.

The unit sailed from St. Nazaire April 14, 1919, on the Princess Matoika. It arrived in the United States April 27, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y.

FIG. 127.-Base Hospital No. 9, Chateauroux

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Arthur W. Tasker, M. C., July 1, 1917, to June 5, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. George W. Hawley, M. C., June 6, 1918, to January 18, 1919.
    Maj. J. P. Erskine, M. C., January 19, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Eugene H. Pool, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Edward Cussler, M. C.


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BASE HOSPITAL NO. 10k

Base Hospital No. 10 was organized at the Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., during February, 1917. It was mobilized at Philadelphia early in May, 1917, and on May 19 sailed from the United States on the St. Paul, arriving in England on May 28, 1917. After a few days' delay in England the unit was assigned to station at Le Treport (Seine Inferieure), France, arriving at that station on June 12, 1917. It was one of the original six hospitals assigned to duty with the British and operated No. 16 General Hospital, British Expeditionary Force. It remained at Le Treport, attached to the British during its entire overseas existence. It ceased to function about February 27, 1919; sailed from Brest, France, on the Kaiserine Augusta Victoria April 8, arrived in the United States April 17, 1919, and was demobilized shortly thereafter.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. M. A. Delaney, M. C., May, 1917, to March 11, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Richard A. Harte, M. C., March 12, 1918, to November 3, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. William J. Taylor, M. C., November 4, 1918, to December 24, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Charles F. Mitchell, M. C., December 25, 1918, to demobilization.
 

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 11l

Base Hospital No. 11 was organized in July, 1916, at the St. Mary's, St. Joseph's, and Augustana Hospitals, Chicago, Ill. The unit was mobilized March 4, 1918, at the St. Mary's Hospital, Chicago, and on April 2, 1918, was transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa, for instructions. After 11 weeks of training at the base hospital at Camp Dodge, it proceeded, on June 18, 1918, to Camp Mills, Long Island, where it remained until June 28, when it sailed from Hoboken, N. J., for Europe, on the Matagama. It arrived at Liverpool, England, June 10, 1918, and at Cherbourg, France, July 12, 1918. From Cherbourg, the unit proceeded by train to Nantes, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1, where it arrived July 16, 1918.

Base Hospital No. 11 was the second hospital unit to arrive at Nantes, where it functioned as a part of a small hospital center. It was assigned to a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, with crisis expansion to 2,500. From July 25, when the first patients were received, to the time the hospital was relieved, it cared for 2,012 medical and 3,890 surgical cases. The greatest number of patients in hospital was on October 15, when 2,386 were being cared for.

Base Hospital No. 11 was relieved by Evacuation Hospital No. 28, on January 14, 1919, and sailed from St. Nazaire April 13, 1919, on the Rijndam. It arrived at Newport News, Va., April 25, and was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., April 29, 1919.

kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 10, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 11, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


639

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. F. O. McFarland, M. C., April 2, 1918, to January 20, 1919.
    Capt. I. R. Schmidt, M. C., January 21, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Nelson M. Percy, M. C.
    Maj. R. C. Flannery, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. G. F. Dick, M. C.
 

FIG. 128.-A general medical ward, exterior, Base Hospital No. 12, operating British General Hospital No. 18

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 12m

Base Hospital No. 12 was organized in July, 1916, at the Northwestern University Medical Department, Chicago, Ill. The officers and nurses were appointed from the Mercy, Wesley, Cook County, and Evanston Hospitals; the enlisted men were recruited largely from the undergraduates of the Northwestern University. The unit was mobilized at Chicago on May 1, 1917. It left Chicago May 16, 1917, arriving in New York May 18; boarded the Mongoliaand sailed on the following day, May 19, 1917, for Europe. During target practice May 20, two nurses accidentally were killed by shell fragments, and the ship returned to New York, reaching there May 21. The Mongoliasailed again on May 24 and docked at Falmouth, England, June 2.

mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 12, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


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The unit proceeded by rail to London, whence it entrained, June 11, for Folkstone, England. From Folkstone the unit proceeded to Boulogne, France, and thence to Dannes-Camiers, Department of Seine Inferieure, where it took over the British General Hospital No. 18. The hospital was of huts and tents, with a capacity of 2,000 beds. Part of the British personnel remained long enough to enable the personnel of Base Hospital No. 12 to become familiar with the workings of a British hospital.

General Hospital No. 18 received convoys of wounded almost daily, directly from the front, until the first of the year 1918. During its active service with the British Expeditionary Force, Base Hospital No. 12 cared for 27,438 British and 2,229 American medical cases; for 30,010 British and 966 American surgical cases. Base Hospital No. 12 remained with the British Expeditionary Force until March 8, 1919, when it entrained for Brest, sailing thence March 26, 1919, on the Leviathan. It arrived in New York April 2, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., shortly afterwards.

FIG. 129.-Exterior, surgical ward, Base Hospital No. 12

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. C. C. Collins, M. C., May 8, 1917, to September 1, 1918.
    Maj. Martin R. Chase, M. C., September 2, 1918, to October 8, 1918.
    Maj. Payson L. Nusbaum, M. C., October 9, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Kellog Speed, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Milton Mandell, M. C.


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BASE HOSPITAL NO. 13n

Base Hospital No. 13 was organized in July, 1916, at the Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, Ill. On January 11, 1918, the unit was mobilized in Chicago, and proceeded January 19, 1918, to Fort McPherson, Ga., for training and equipment. The organization left Fort McPherson May 1, 1918, for Camp Merritt, N. J., and embarked May 19, on the Saturnia for Europe. It arrived in Le Havre, France, May 31, 1918, and proceeded on June 8 to its permanent station at Limoges, Department of Haute Vienne, base section No. 2. It arrived at Limoges June 10, and formed a part of what was to be the hospital center there.

The unit occupied 52 wooden buildings, constructed by the engineers, located in a park near the center of the city. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,500 beds, but in October and November, 1918, it was expanded to 2,300 beds. The first patients arrived July 19, 1918; the total number cared for was 6,267, of which 3,648 were surgical and 2,619 medical cases, with 965 operations. The largest number of patients in hospital was 2,323 sick and wounded on November 13, 1918.

The hospital ceased to function on January 18, 1919, when it was relieved by Evacuation Hospital No. 32. It sailed from Bordeaux, France, March 25, 1919, on the Wilhemina, arriving at Camp Mills, N. Y., April 5, 1919, and was
demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., April 23, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. C. P. Robbins, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. D. D. Lewis, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

     Lieut. Col. R. C. Brown, M. C.
 
BASE HOSPITAL NO. 14o

Base Hospital No. 14 was organized in July, 1916, at the St. Luke and Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, Ill. The unit was mobilized March 1, 1918, at the 8th Regiment Armory, Chicago, Ill. On April 1, 1918, it was transferred to Camp Custer, Mich., for training and equipping. It left Camp Custer July 6, en route to Camp Merritt, N. J. It left New York July 15, 1918, on the Melbourne, arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, July 18, leaving there July 20, 1918. It reached Liverpool, England, July 31, and arrived at Cherbourg, France, August 3, 1918.

nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 13, A. E. F.," by Col. C. P. Robbins, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 14, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


642

On August 4, the organization was ordered to Mars-sur-Allier, Department Nievre, in the intermediate section, A. E. F., where it arrived August 7, 1918. Base Hospital No. 14, was the third hospital to arrive at Mars, where it formed a part of one of the largest hospital centers in France. The unit occupied a type A hospital, and on August 20, 1918, began to receive its first patients. The normal capacity of the hospital was 2,000 beds; the largest number of patients in hospital was 1,751, on November 15, 1918. It cared for 5,534 sick and wounded, of which 3,330 were medical and 2,204 surgical cases.

On January 15, 1919, Base Hospital No. 14 was relieved by Base Hospital No. 131, and sailed from Brest April 7, 1919, on the Graf Waldersee, arriving in Hoboken April 20, 1919. The organization was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., on May 2, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. William W. Vaughan, M. C., April 22, 1918, to January 20, 1919.
    Maj. Thomas L. Dagg, M. C., January 22, 1919, to March 4, 1919.
    Capt. Hubert B. Blaydes, M. C., March 5, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Samuel C. Plummer, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John H. McClellan, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 15p

Base Hospital No. 15 was organized at Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y., on April 12, 1917, and was mobilized at New York City in June, 1917. It sailed from New York for Europe on the Lapland on July 2, 1917, arriving in Europe on July 12, 1917. It was the first base hospital to arrive overseas for duty with the American Expeditionary Forces and was stationed at Chaumont, Haute Marne, France, where it arrived on July 16, 1917.

It ceased operating on January 15, 1919; sailed for the United States on the Olympic February 18, 1919; arrived in the United States on February 24, 1919, and was demobilized shortly thereafter.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. H. S. Hansell, M. C., from date of organization to June 18, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Rolfe Floyd, M. C., June 19, 1918, to February 3, 1919.

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 15, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


643

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 17q

Base Hospital No. 17 was organized in September, 1916, at the Harper Hospital, Detroit, Mich., and was mobilized there on June 28, 1917. On July 3, 1917, the organization was transferred to Allentown, Pa., leaving there July 11, for New York, where it embarked on the Mongolia and sailed July 13, 1917. It arrived at Southampton, England, July 24, by way of Plymouth, England, and at Le Havre, France, July 25, 1917. It remained at Le Havre until July 28, when it proceeded by rail to its final destination, Dijon, Department Cote D'or, in the advance section, arriving there July 29, 1917.

Base Hospital No. 17 was the first American organization to arrive at that station, where it functioned as an independent hospital, until January 8, 1919. At Dijon the unit was assigned the Hospital St. Ignace (French Auxilliary Hospital No. 77), then operated by the French Army. The French had about 230 patients in the hospital when the unit arrived, the evacuation of which was not completed until August 18, 1917. It began receiving American patients on August 21, 1917, but the hospital was not officially turned over to the commanding officer until September 2, 1917.

FIG. 130.-Base Hospital No. 15, Chaumont

In June 1918, when the capacity of the hospital proved inadequate, a French seminary was taken over at Plombiers, about 3½ miles from the main hospital, and was operated as an annex. The seminary was a large stone building, of 800-bed capacity, and was used largely for convalescent and minor surgical cases.

Base Hospital No. 17 ceased to function January 8, 1919; the unit sailed from St. Nazaire April 14, 1919, on the Princess Matoika, arriving at Newport News, Va., April 27, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Custer, Mich., May 9, 1919.

qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 17, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


644

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Henry C. Coburn, M. C., June 6, 1917, to May 12, 1918.
    Col. Angus McLean, M. C., May 13, 1918, to March 24, 1919.
    Maj. Thomas K. Gruber, M. C., March 25, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Henry N. Torrey, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. George E. McKean, M. C.
 

FIG. 131.-Base Hospital No. 17, Dijon

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 18r

Base Hospital No. 18 was organized in November, 1916, at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. The unit was mobilized May 24, 1917, at Baltimore, and on June 6, proceeded to New York for transportation to Europe. The organization embarked on the Finland June 9, 1917. The transport remained in the harbor until June 13, when it left en route to St. Nazaire, arriving there June 28, 1917. On June 30, the unit proceeded to Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, where it was quartered in the normal-school building of Savenay, and while waiting for assignment to a station underwent a certain amount of military training. Part of the unit was detached on July 5 and sent to St.

rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 18, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


645

Nazaire, where it took over and operated a hospital, which at first was known as United States Army Hospital No. 1 and later was designated as Base Hospital No. 101.

Toward the end of July, 1917, the unit proceeded to Bazoilles sur Meuse, Department of Vosges, in the advance section, where it arrived July 26, 1917. Base Hospital No. 18 was the first hospital unit to arrive at that station and was the farthest advanced hospital in the American Expeditionary Forces at that time. It functioned independently until July 1, 1918, when it became a part of a large and very important hospital center. At Bazoilles, the unit took over from the French Medical Department an estate comprising a stone hunting lodge, several groups of stone outbuildings, and a 25-acre tract of forested land. A number of frame buildings were erected, with a total bed capacity of 1,000, which later was increased by tent expansion to 1,300 beds.

Base Hospital No. 18 operated an optical and ophthalmological department. It was designated as a special hospital for chest and abdominal surgical cases, and received all contagious disease cases coming to the center.

During its active service, August 1, 1917, to January 9, 1919, the hospital treated a total of 14,179 medical and surgical cases.

Among the enlisted men of the unit were 32 third-year medical students, who completed their last scholastic year in France, received their degrees, and commissions in the Medical Reserve Corps.

On January 9, 1919, the hospital turned over its patients and property to Provisional Hospital No. 1, and left for St. Nazaire January 12, 1919. On January 31, 1919, the organization boarded the Finland at St. Nazaire and arrived in New York February 14, 1919. On February 25, 1919, it was demobilized at Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y., and thus the Johns Hopkins unit ceased to exist.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. J. D. Heysinger, M. C., June 7, 1917, to August 18, 1917.
    Col. George M. Edwards, M. C., August 19, 1917, to July 14, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. H. H. Van Kirk, M. C., July 15, 1918, to October 19, 1918.
    Maj. Bertram M. Bernheim, M. C., October 20, 1918, to December 5, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. H. H. Van Kirk, M. C., December 6, 1918, to January 18, 1919.
    Maj. Harvey B. Stone, M. C., January 19, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Harvey B. Stone, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Capt. C. G. Guthrie, M. C.


646

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 19s

Base Hospital No. 19 was organized in March, 1916, at Rochester, N. Y., and was mobilized in the 3d Regiment Armory, that City, on December 17, 1917, where it trained for five months. On June 4, 1918, the organization left New York on the Baltic, arriving in Liverpool, England, June 16, 1918, and in Le Havre, France, June 18. It left Le Havre, June 20, en route to Vichy, Department of Allier, in the intermediate section, arriving there June 22, 1918. This hospital, the second hospital to arrive in Vichy, later formed a part of the hospital center there. It operated in 22 hotels and conducted 12 messes. It began receiving patients July 12, 1918. The normal capacity of the hospital was 3,629 beds, which in crisis emergency could be expanded to 4,114 beds and cots. Largest number of sick and wounded treated at one time was 3,517, on November 12, 1918. This hospital received both surgical and medical cases, the total number cared for being 11,071.

On January 20, 1919, the hospital transferred all its remaining patients and ceased to function. The unit sailed from St. Nazaire on the Freedom, April 13, 1919, arriving in the United States April 28, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., on May 7, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. George A. Skinner, M. C., December 23, 1917, to July 19, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. John M. Swan, M. C., July 20, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Charles W. Hennington, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. William V. Evers, M.C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 20t

Base Hospital No. 20 was organized in September, 1916, at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and was mobilized November 30, 1917, at Philadelphia. It received training until April 1, 1918, when it left for Camp Merritt, N. J., where it remained, completing its equipment, until April 21, 1918. On April 24, 1918, it sailed from New York on the Leviathan, arriving at Brest, France, May 2, 1918. It proceeded from Brest to its final destination, Chatel Guyon, Department of Puy-de-Dome, in the intermediate section, reaching there on May 7. Chatel Guyon is a summer health resort, situated in the Auvergne Mountains, and there the unit took over various summer hotels, villas, and garages, a total of 33 buildings with a bed capacity of 2,500.

sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 19, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 20, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. John B. Carnett, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S.G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


647

Base Hospital No. 20 was designated as one of the hospitals in the American Expeditionary Forces for the observation of suspected cases of tuberculosis. It cared for 8,706 surgical and medical cases; the greatest number of patients in hospital at one time was 2,253, on October 10, 1918. It ceased to function on January 20, 1919, all patients remaining in hospital on that date being transferred to other hospitals. The personnel left St. Nazaire on the Freedom, April 13, 1919, and reached New York, April 28, 1919. From New York the unit proceeded to Camp Dix, N. J., where it was demobilized on May
5, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Thomas H. Johnson, M. C., November 30, 1917, to July 28, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. George M. Piersol, M. C., July 29, 1918, to November 3, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. John M. Carnett, M. C., November 4, 1918, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Eldridge L. Eliason, M. C.
    Capt. John E. Kelly, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. George M. Piersol, M. C.
    Maj. J. H. Musser, Jr., M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 21u

Base Hospital No. 21 was organized in July, 1916, at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Mo., and mobilized April 27, 1917, at St. Louis. On May 17 it was transferred to New York; thence it sailed on the St. Paul, May 19, 1917. It arrived at Liverpool, England, May 28, 1917, and was assigned to duty with the British Expeditionary Forces. On June 10, the unit landed at Le Havre, France. On the following day it entrained for Rouen, Department of Seine Inferieure, where it took over and operated British General Hospital No. 12. The latter hospital had been in existence since August, 1914, and was one of the 14 hospitals and convalescent camps maintained by the British in the Rouen area. When first taken over by the American unit, the hospital practically consisted of tents; later, however, a number of Adrian type buildings and Nisson huts were erected.

The capacity of the hospital was 1,350 beds, but in October, 1918, as many as 1,950 patients were cared for at one time. It received 29,706 surgical and 31,837 medical cases. Of these, 2,833 were American, the remainder being British patients. During the German offensive operations in the spring of 1918, great numbers of wounded were received directly from the field.

The hospital ceased to function January 22, 1919, and on February 11, 1919, the personnel proceeded to Vannes (Morbihan) to await transportation to the United States. On April 7, 1919, the organization sailed from Brest on the Graf Waldersee, arriving in New York April 20. On May 3, 1919, it was demobilized at Camp Funston, Kans.

uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 21, A. E. F.," by Maj. Walter Fischel, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


648

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. James D. Fife, M. C., May 12, 1917, to October 18, 1917.
    Col. Fred T. Murphy, M. C., October 19, 1917, to May 15, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Borden S. Veeder, M. C., May 16, 1918, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Malvern B. Clompton, M. C.
    Maj. W. R. Rainey, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Walter Fischel, M. C.

FIG. 132.-A view of part of Base Hospital No. 21, operating British General Hospital No. 12, Rouen

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 22v

Base Hospital No. 22 was organized in July, 1916, at Milwaukee, Wis., and was mobilized on January 7, 1918, at the Light Horse Squadron Armory, Milwaukee, where it was trained and equipped until May 19, 1918, when it left for Camp Merritt, N. J. From May 21 until June 3, it remained at Camp Merritt, then it proceeded to New York, and embarked on the Baltic. It departed from New York on June 4, and arrived at Liverpool, England, June

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 22, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Curtis A. Evans, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


649

16, and crossed to Le Havre, France, June 18. It left Le Havre June 20 by rail for Beau Desert, Department of Gironde, in base section No. 2, where it arrived on June 22, 1918, and was the first hospital of a group that later became the hospital center.

The hospital occupied a type A unit, with a bed capacity of 1,000, but during the stress of work in the fall of 1918 the hospital expanded to surrounding vacant units, until on November 10, 1918, 5,098 cases were under treatment. In December, 1918, this hospital was designated as a hospital for evacuations only, other hospitals in the center acting as receiving hospitals. During its activity, July 22, 1918, to January 25, 1919, this organization cared for 17,202 cases, both medical and surgical.

The unit was relieved by Evacuation Hospital No. 20, on January 25, 1919, and sailed from Bordeaux on the Santa Marta, February 17, 1919. It arrived in New York on March 5, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., March 16, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. T. J. Kirkpatrick, M. C., December 19, 1917, to July 6, 1918.
    Maj. Thomas L. Gore, M. C., July 7, 1918, to January 27, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. C. A. Evans, M. C., January 28, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. C. A. Evans, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Robert C. Brown, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 23w

Base Hospital No. 23 was organized in January, 1917, at the General Hospital, Buffalo, N. Y., and was mobilized at Fort Porter, N. Y., August 21, 1917, where the organization was trained and equipped. On November 21, 1917, after three months of training, the unit left Fort Porter en route to New York, arriving there November 22, 1917. It embarked on the Carpathia November 22, and left New York the same day en route to Europe, by way of Halifax, Canada. It arrived in Liverpool, England, December 8, 1917, and Le Havre, France, December 14, 1917. After a two days' rest at Le Havre, the unit proceeded to Vittel, Department of Vosges, in the advance section, its permanent station, arriving there December 19, 1917. It was the second hospital to arrive at Vittel, and later became a part of the hospital center there. The hospital occupied in Vittel 21 buildings, comprising hotels, villas, and garages, with a bed capacity of 1,800, which could be expanded in emergency to 2,800. The first patients were received January 8, 1918. By February 6, 1919, when the hospital ceased to function, 11,625 surgical and medical cases had been cared for.

wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 23, A. E. F," by Capt. F. May, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


650

On February 6, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred to the hospital center at Bazoilles, and Base Hospital No. 23 ceased to function on that date. On April 20, 1919, the organization left Brest on the Finland, arriving in New York May 1, 1919. It was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., shortly afterwards.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Guy V. Rukke, M. C., August 24, 1917, to August 7, 1918.
    Maj. Samuel E. Getty, M. C., August 8, 1918, to November 26, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Marshall Clinton, M. C., November 27, 1818, to January 22, 1919.
    Maj. Joseph Betts, M. C., January 23, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Marshall Clinton, M. C.

 CHIEF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Nelson G. Russell, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 24x

Base Hospital No. 24 was organized in January, 1917, at Tulane University, New Orleans, La., and was mobilized August 31, 1917, at Jackson Barracks, La. On September 3, 1917, the organization was transferred to Camp Greenleaf, Ga., where it was trained and equipped.

On February 16, 1918, after five months of training, the organization sailed from New York on the Carmania. It arrived in Liverpool, England, March 4, 1918, and proceeded by way of Southampton and Le Havre to Limoges, Department of Haute Vienne, in base section No. 2, reaching there March 15, 1918. It was the second hospital to arrive at that station, where it formed a part of a three-unit hospital center. The hospital was located in a factory plant, which previously had been occupied by Mobile Hospital No. 39. In addition to the factory plant, there were 14 wooden barracks, used as wards and as quarters. In October, 1918, the École d' Institutrices was taken over and operated as annex to Base Hospital No. 24.

The capacity of the hospital was 1,200 beds, but during the stress of work in November, 1918, this was increased to 1,740 beds by using the quarters as wards. During its activity, March 16, 1918, to January 10, 1919, 3,503 surgical and 3,858 medical cases were admitted.

The hospital ceased to function on January 10, 1919, and the personnel sailed from St. Nazaire on the Walter A. Luckenbach, April 9, 1919, arriving in New York April 19, 1919. The unit was demobilized at Camp Shelby, Miss., on May 3, 1919.

xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 24, A. E. F," by Lieut. Col. Charles E. McBrayer, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


651

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Charles E. McBrayer, M. C.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Urban Maes, M. C.
    Capt. John Smyth, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. John B. Elliott, M. C.
    Maj. John T. Halsey, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 25y

Base Hospital No. 25 was organized in March, 1916, at the General Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, and was mobilized March 7, 1918, at Camp Sherman, Ohio, where it underwent training for three months. The organization left Camp Sherman, June 19, 1918, for Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y. It embarked June 27, 1918, on the Lapland, and sailed the next day for Liverpool. It arrived at Liverpool, England, July 10, 1918, and at Cherbourg, France, July 12, 1918. From Cherbourg the unit proceeded to Allerey, Department Saone et Loire, in the intermediate section, reaching there July 15, 1918. Base Hospital No. 25 was the second hospital to arrive at that station, and formed a part of what later became a large hospital center. The hospital occupied a type A unit, augmented by 36 marquée tents, bringing the capacity of the hospital to 1,750 beds. The first convoy of patients arrived July 30, 1918; the highest number of patients in hospital at one time was 1,815, in November, 1918. This hospital received all the psychoneurosis cases in the center. During its activity, July 30, 1918, to January 11, 1919, the hospital cared for 2,822 surgical and 3,038 medical cases.

The hospital ceased to function on January 11, 1919. The unit sailed from St. Nazaire for New York, April 13, 1919, on the Freedom. It arrived in the United States April 28, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Taylor, Ky., May 7, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Edward G. Huber, M. C., April 5, 1918, to September 13, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. William Gillespie, M. C., September 14, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Charles M. Paul, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Henry L. Woodward, M. C.

yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 25, A. E. F," by Lieut. Col. William Gillespie, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


652

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 26z

Base Hospital No. 26 was organized in May, 1917, at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and was mobilized at Minneapolis on December 13, 1917. On December 28, 1917, the unit entrained for Fort McPherson, Ga., where it arrived on the 31st. It remained there in training until the middle of May, 1918, when it proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J., to prepare for embarkation. It left Hoboken June 5, 1918, on the Adriatic, arriving in Liverpool, England, June 16, 1918, and at Le Havre, France, within a day or two. It reached Allerey, Department Saone et Loire, in the intermediate section, June 20, 1918, being the first unit to reach this station, later the location of a large hospital center. It furnished the personnel for much the greater part of the center staff.

The hospital was housed in a type A unit, augmented by a number of marquée tents, the total capacity of the hospital being 2,000 beds. The first convoy of patients arrived on July 23, and the second on July 30; the second convoy came directly from evacuation hospitals at the front and brought many wounded that had not been operated on. This hospital was designated by the commanding office of the hospital center to receive all ophthalmic cases for the center. It established a clinic for all ambulatory ocular cases of the center. During the service of this department, 818 refractions were made.

Base Hospital No. 26 ceased to function on January 10, 1919, and the organization sailed from St. Nazaire on the Rijndam, April 13, 1919, arriving at Newport News, Va., April 25, 1919. The entire unit was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., May 13, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. J. H. Ford, M. C., December 17, 1917, to June 23, 1918.
    Col. A. A. Law, M. C., June 24, 1918, to December 26, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. John S. Staley, M. C., December 27, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. John S. Staley, M. C.
    Col. A. A. Law, M. C.
    Maj. E. C. Moore, M. C.
    Maj. M. E. Lott, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. S. M. White, M. C.
    Capt. David M. Berkman, M. C.
 

zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 26, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


653

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 27a

Base Hospital No. 27 was organized in April, 1916, at the Medical School of the University of Pittsburgh, Pa., and was mobilized at Pittsburgh, on August 18, 1917. Three days later, the unit entrained for Allentown, Pa., where it arrived August 22, 1917, and spent five weeks in training. On September 27, 1917, the unit left New York on the Lapland. It reached Halifax, Canada, September 29, and left the same day for Liverpool, England, reaching there October 11, 1917. From Liverpool it proceeded by rail to Southampton, arriving there October 12, and remained there in a rest camp until October 16, 1917, when it crossed the English Channel and disembarked at Le Havre, France, October 17. After spending a day in the rest camp at Le Havre, the organization proceeded to its permanent station at Angers, Department Maine et Loire, base section No. 1, arriving there October 19, 1917. The hospital occupied the Mongazon seminary, a large three-story masonry structure, which was readily converted into a hospital. In addition, numerous wards of wooden construction were erected; these wards were of the Grandum (frame) type and of the Bessonneau (frame plastered) type. In August 1918, the Grand Séminaire, a large modern three-story building, was taken over and operated as an annex for the treatment of convalescing patients. The hospital began to receive patients November 9, 1917. Its normal capacity was 2,800 beds; and in emergencies this was expanded to 4,100. This expansion extended into a number of marquée tents.

FIG. 133.-A view of part of the temporary buildings, Base Hospital No. 27, Angers

aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 27, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


654

During the week ending October 17, 1918, Angers was designated a hospital center; however, it was not until after the armistice was signed that Provisional Base Hospital No. 1 was organized there, from personnel comprising Base Hospital No. 27.

The hospital cared for 19,522 patients; of these 10,455 were medical and 9,067 surgical cases.

On January 5, 1919, Base Hospital No. 27 was relieved by Base Hospital No. 85, and on March 14, 1919, sailed from St. Nazaire on the Manchuria, and arrived at New York November 24. It was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., March 25, 1919.

FIG. 134.-Base Hospital No. 28, part of Limoges hospital center

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Royal Reynolds, M. C., July, 1917, to January 8, 1919.
    Maj. Stanley S. Smith, M. C., January 9, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Robert T. Miller, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. J. D. Heard, M. C.


655

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 28b

Base Hospital No. 28 was organized in April, 1917, at the Christian Church Hospital, Kansas City, Mo., and was mobilized January 21, 1918, at Kansas City, Mo., where it received its preliminary training and equipment. On February 23, 1918, the organization was transferred to Fort McPherson, Ga., where it continued its training at General Hospital No. 6. On June 2,1918, the organization left for Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there June 4, 1918, and sailed on the Meganic, June 12, 1918. It disembarked at Liverpool, England, June 25, and proceeded immediately to Southampton, leaving there June 28 for Cherbourg, France. It arrived at Limoges, Department of Haute Vienne, base section No. 2, on July 2, 1918. It was the third and last hospital to report at the Limoges hospital center. The unit occupied a type A hospital and also took over from the French a large school building, the Belaire Seminary. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,780 beds, which in emergency was increased to 2,965. The first patients were received July 23; the total number received was 9,954, of which 6,087 were medical and 3,867 surgical cases.

On February 1, 1919, Base Hospital No. 28 was relieved by Base Hospital No. 98, and on April 19, 1919, it returned to the United States on the Mercury, from St. Nazaire. It arrived in the United States on April 30, and was mustered out of the service at Camp Dix, N. J., on May 2, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. William B. Banister, M. C., February 22, 1918, to July 15, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Lindsay S. Milne, M. C., July 16, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. J. F. Binnie, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. George H. Hoxie, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 29c

Base Hospital No. 29 was organized at City and County Hospital, Denver, Colo., on April 5, 1917, and was mobilized at Camp Cody, N. Mex., during March, 1918. The unit trained at Camp Cody and at Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., until July 5, 1918, when it left for Hoboken, N. J., arriving there on July 6, 1918, when it embarked on the Empress of Russia, and sailed the same date for Europe. The unit arrived in England on July 17, 1918, and was assigned to duty at North Eastern Fever Hospital, London, where it arrived on the night of July 19, 1918. It took over the hospital from the British on August 1, 1918. The hospital cared for 3,976 cases, of which 2,351 were surgical and 1,625 were medical.

bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 28, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 29, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


656

Base Hospital No. 29 ceased operating on January 12, 1919; sailed for the United States on the Olympic, February 18, 1919; arrived in the United States on February 24, 1919, and was demobilized at Fort Logan, Colo., on March 13,
1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. John B. Anderson, M. C.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Edward F. Dean, M. C.
    Capt. Robert Ferguson, M. C.

FIG. 135.-Surgical building, Base Hospital No. 29

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John M. Amesse, M. C.
    Maj. William W. Williams, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 30d

Base Hospital No. 30 was organized in March, 1917, at the University of California, San Francisco, and was mobilized November 20, 1917, at Fort Mason, Calif. After three months of training and equipping the organization sailed from Fort Mason, March 1, 1918, on the Northern Pacific for New

dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 30, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


657

York via Panama, arriving at New York March 17. The unit remained at Camp Merritt, N. J., until April 22, when it embarked at Hoboken on the Leviathanand sailed April 24. It arrived at Brest, France, May 2, 1918, and
at Royat, Department Puy de Dome, in the intermediate section, May 7.

Royat is a small town situated in the Auvergne Mountains, and is a popular health and watering resort. There was no other hospital at Royat, and until shortly before the armistice Base Hospital No. 30 functioned independently. For a short time it was a part of the Clermont-Ferrand hospital center. The hospital occupied 16 hotels and a garage, with a total normal bed capacity of 2,400. Difficulty was experienced with the sewerage system; all buildings were dependent on cesspolls, which on account of shortage of wagons and men could not be emptied as often as required. Cesspools were located directly under the buildings and, when they overflowed, flooded the basements and kitchens.

FIG. 136.-Airplane view, Base Hospital No. 30, Royat

The first patients were received on June 12; the total number of cases treated in hospital from June 12, 1918, to January 20, 1919, was 7,562, of which 2,415 were surgical and 5,147 medical cases.

On January 20, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred and Base Hospital No. 30 ceased to function on that date. The unit was transferred to St. Nazaire, whence it sailed on April 13, 1919, on the Freedom, for the United States. Upon arrival in the United States on April 28 the organization was ordered to Presidio of San Francisco, Calif., where it arrived on May 15 and was demobilized on May 26, 1919.


658

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Elmer A. Dean, M. C., November 21, 1917, to June 15, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. E. S. Kilgore, M. C., June 16, 1918, to November 11, 1918.
    Maj. Alanson Weeks, M. C., November 12, 1918, to November 22, 1918.
    Col. L. D. Carter, M. C., November 23, 1918, to demobilization.
 
 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

     Maj. Alanson Weeks, M. C.
 
 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. E. S. Kilgore, M.C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 31e

Base Hospital No. 31 was organized March 26, 1917, at the Youngstown City Hospital, Youngstown, Ohio, and was mobilized at Youngstown, September 7, 1917. On September 8, it entrained for Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., to undergo training and equipping. It remained in training at Camp Crane until November 21, 1917, when it was transferred to Camp Mills, Long Island, where it remained until December 14, 1917, preparing for embarkation. It sailed from New York on the Leviathan, on December 15; arrived at Liverpool, England, on December 25 and at Le Havre, France, December 26. After three days at the Le Havre rest camp, the unit entrained December 30 for Contrexeville, Vosges, in the advance section, arriving there January 1, 1918. Contrexeville was one of the two towns comprising the Vittel-Contrexeville hospital center. Base Hospital No. 31 was the fourth and last hospital to arrive at Contrexeville, which, like Vittel, is a summer health resort, with numerous hotels; eight of these were assigned to Base Hospital No. 31.

Because of the numerous changes in buildings that had to be made, and of the nonarrival of equipment, the hospital did not begin to function until March 23, 1918, when the first patients were received. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,200 beds; the crisis expansion, 2,000 beds. One ward of this hospital contained 250 beds. The largest number of patients in hospital was 1,786 on October 18, 1918. The hospital treated 3,413 medical and 4,585 surgical cases.

On February 3, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred and Base Hospital No. 31 was officially closed. The unit proceeded to St. Nazaire, whence it sailed on the Mercury, April 19, 1919. It arrived in the United States on April 30, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., May 2, 1919.

eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 31, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


659

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Adam E. Schlanser, M. C., August 30, 1917, to June 16, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Colin R. Clark, M. C., June 17, 1918, to July 18, 1918.
    Maj. A. E. Brant, M. C., July 19, 1918, to September 30, 1918.
    Maj. John L. Washburn, M. C., October 1, 1918, to November 24, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. J. A. Sherbondy, M. C., November 25, 1918, to January 2, 1919.
    Maj. John L. Washburn, M. C., January 3, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. J. A. Sherbondy, M. C.
    Lieut. Col. E. S. Van Duyn, M. C.
    Maj. A. E. Brant, M. C.
    Maj. C. E. Coon, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Colin R. Clark, M. C.
    Maj. C. C. Wolferth, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 32f

Base Hospital No. 32 was organized in February, 1917, at Indianapolis, Ind., and was mobilized at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., September 1, 1917. After three months of training and equipping there, the unit left December 1, 1917, for Hoboken, N. J. It embarked on the George Washington, December 3, and sailed the following day for Brest, France, arriving there December 21. After three days rest, the unit left for Contrexeville, Vosges, advance section, where it arrived on December 26, 1917. Eight hotels were assigned to Base Hospital No. 32; various other buildings were used as warehouses, etc. Because numerous changes had to be made in these hotels, the unit did not begin to function until March 23, 1918, when the first convoy of patients was received. This organization was the first to arrive at Contrexeville, but third to arrive in the Vittel-Contrexeville group. The normal bed capacity was 1,300, which in emergency was increased to 1,900. During its activity, March 23, 1918, to January 12, 1919, the hospital cared for 9,698 medical and surgical cases.

The hospital was officially closed on January 12, 1918. The unit then was transferred to St. Nazaire for transportation to the United States. It sailed April 13, 1919, on the Freedom and was demobilized at Camp Taylor, Ky., May 7, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Maj. Harry R. Beery, M. C., August 27, 1917, to March 1, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Edmund D. Clark, M. C., March 2, 1918, to March 6, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. H. H. Van Kirk, M. C., March 7, 1918, to July 14, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Edmund D. Clark, M. C., July 15, 1918, to January 14, 1919.
    Maj. James F. Clark, M. C., January 15, 1919, to demobilization.
 

fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 32, A. E. F." by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


660

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Edmund D. Clark, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Bernays Kennedy, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 33g

Base Hospital No. 33 was organized in June, 1917, at the Albany Hospital, Albany, N. Y., and was mobilized November 19, 1917, at Troop B Armory, Albany, N. Y., where it remained in training for five months. On April 26, 1918, the organization entrained for Camp Merritt, N. J., where it remained until May 2. It embarked May 3 on the Carmania, leaving the same day for Liverpool, England, where it arrived May 16, 1918. It left immediately for the rest camp at Knotty Ash, where it remained for two days and was then transferred to the American rest camp, Winnall Down, Winchester. At Winnall Down the unit remained awaiting permanent assignment until June 3, 1918. The majority of the personnel during this time were assigned to duty in hospitals and camps in England. On June 3 the unit was assigned
 

FIG. 137.-Base Hospital No. 33, Portsmouth, England

 

sxagThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 33, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Erastus Corning M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


661

station at Portsmouth, England, and took over a portion of the Fifth Southern General Hospital, known as Fawcett Road section. On July 8, 1918, the unit was transferred to the Portsmouth Borough Asylum, which was in greater readiness for immediate use. The asylum buildings were of modern construction, brick and stone, in the center of an 83-acre tract, and were capable of housing 1,000 patients.

The capacity of the hospital was to be increased by construction of additional wards, about 70 in number. These buildings were about 35 per cent complete on November 23, 1918, when orders were received to abandon further construction. On August 5, 1918, the chief surgeon, A. E. F., designated Base Hospital No. 33 a special hospital for war neuroses; 160 of these cases were handled by this hospital. The first patients were received on July 24, 1918; largest number of sick and wounded in hospital was on November 17, 1918, when 1,586 were being cared for. From July 24 to December 31, 1918, the hospital treated 1,782 medical and 1,765 surgical cases.

On January 1, 1919, all remaining patients were evacuated and the hospital ceased to function on that date. The unit sailed from Brest February 18, 1919, on the Olympic. It arrived in New York February 24, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., March 5, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Alleyne von Schrader, M. C., September, 1917, to August 2, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Erastus Corning, M. C., August 3, 1918, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. A. W. Elting, M. C.
    Maj. Charles G. McMullen, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Clinton B. Hawn, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 34h

Base Hospital No. 34 was organized in April, 1917, at the Episcopal Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., and was mobilized there on September 7, 1917. On September 8, the organization proceeded to Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., where it was trained and equipped. On November 21, the unit was transferred to Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y., to await transportation abroad. It embarked December 14 on the Leviathan, leaving New York the next day for Liverpool, England, where it arrived December 25, 1917. It proceeded from Liverpool by rail to Southampton and crossed the channel on the night of December 25, arriving in Le Havre, France, December 26. From Le Havre the unit was sent to Blois, France, for further orders; from there it was as-
 

hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 34, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


662

signed to its permanent station at Nantes, Loire Inferieure, in base section No. 1. It arrived at Nantes January 8, 1918, and took over Grand Séminaire, a four-story brick structure, which before the war had been used as a Catholic seminary. In addition to this, numerous wooden buildings were erected, and later when more space was required a normal-school building was leased and opened October 19, 1918. This latter addition was used as an annex for sick and wounded officers.

Of the four hospitals that formed the Nantes hospital center, Base Hospital No. 34 was the first to arrive. It acted independently until July 29, 1918, when the hospital center was organized The first patients were received April 2, 1918; from then until January 16, 1919, 9,080 sick and wounded were treated. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,300 beds; the largest number of patients in hospital was 1,527 on November 6, 1918.

On January 16, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 36 relieved Base Hospital No. 34. The unit of Base Hospital No. 34 sailed from St. Nazaire on the Walter A. Luckenbach, April 9, 1919. It arrived in the United States April 19, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., April 27, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Ralph G. DeVoe, M. C.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Emory G. Alexander, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John B. Carson, M. C.
    Capt. W. H. Long, M. C.
    Maj. Oliver H. P. Pepper, M. C.
    Maj. Charles Fife, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 35i

Base Hospital No. 35 was organized in April, 1917, at the Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif., and was mobilized in Los Angeles, Calif., March 14, 1918. The organization trained and was equipped at Camp Kearny, Calif., until July 4, 1918, on which date it left for Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there July 9. On July 15, 1918, it sailed from New York on the Port Melbourne, arriving at England, July 31, 1918, and at Le Havre, France, August 7. It entrained August 7 for Mars-sur-Allier, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section, arriving there August 10, 1918.

Base Hospital No. 35 was the fourth unit to arrive in Mars, and became a part of one of the largest and important hospital centers in the American Expeditionary Forces. The organization occupied a set of type A wooden barracks, and began to receive patients on September 2, 1918, over 500 being

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 35, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


663

admitted on that day. Its normal bed capacity was 2,000, but as many as 2,800 sick and wounded were taken care of at one time. During its activity, September 2, 1918, to January 15, 1919, the hospital cared for 3,401 medical and 3,117 surgical cases, with 500 operations.

On January 15, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 30 relieved Base Hospital No. 35, the latter organization leaving February 14 for St. Nazaire to await transportation to the United States.

The unit sailed from St. Nazaire April 13, on the Rijndam, arriving in Newport News, April 25, and was demobilized at Camp Kearny, Calif., May 6, 1919.  

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER 

    Lieut. Col. Geo. F. Lull, M. C., June 5, 1918, to January 14, 1919.
    Maj. J. A. Van Kaathoven, M. C., January 15, 1919, to February 13, 1919.
    Maj. Eliot Alden, M. C., February 14, 1919, to May 6, 1919.
 

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. J. A. Van Kaathoven, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Charles R. Sowder, M. C.
    Capt. George C. Hunter, M. C.
 
  BASE HOSPITAL NO. 36j

Base Hospital No. 36 was organized in April, 1917, at the Detroit College of Medicine, Detroit, Mich., and was mobilized at Detroit, August 23, 1917. The unit remained in training there for two months and sailed from New York on the Orduna, October 27, 1917, arriving in France on November 11, 1917, and at Vittel, its permanent station, on November 17. It was the first unit to arrive at Vittel, later forming a part of the Vittel-Contrexeville hospital center. It occupied 16 hotels and villas and had a total bed capacity of 1,650. The first patients were received December 8, 1917. During its activity, December 8, 1917, to January 14, 1919, the hospital cared for 14,114 medical and surgical cases, of which 1,376 were allied sick and wounded.

On January 14, 1919, all remaining patients were evacuated and the hospital ceased to function. The unit sailed from St. Nazaire, April 13, 1919, on the Rijndam, arriving at Newport News, Va., April 25, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Custer, Mich., May 4, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Hiram A. Phillips, M. C., April 19, 1917, to September 13, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. B. R. Shurly, M. C., September 14, 1918, to January 22, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Henry G. Berry, M. C., January 23, 1919, to May 4, 1919.
 

jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 36, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


664

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Frank B. Walker, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Theodore A. McGraw, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 37k

Base Hospital No. 37 was organized in July, 1917, at the Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. On January 4, 1918, the unit was called into active service and mobilized at the Twenty-third Regiment Armory, Brooklyn, N. Y., later moving to the Fourteenth Regiment Armory, that city. On May 19, 1918, it left the port of New York on the Lapland, arriving in Liverpool, England, on May 31. On June 1 it proceeded to the American Rest Camp at Southampton, and on June 5 it left Rest Camp for Camp Efford, Plymouth, England, which was to be its permanent station. It was ordered on July 18, 1918, to proceed to Dartford, Kent, England, for station, where it occupied a large hospital controlled by the British metropolitan asylums board.

The normal capacity of the hospital was 2,000 beds, but during November, 1918, tents had to be erected to accommodate the large number of patients that were being admitted at that time. During its activity the hospital cared for 3,111 surgical and 1,239 medical cases. On January 21, 1919, all remaining patients were evacuated and the hospital was closed. The unit sailed from Brest, France, on the Olympic, February 18, 1919. It arrived in New York February 24, and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., March 5, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. B. H. Dutcher, M. C., December 13, 1917, to July 6, 1918.
    Col. E. H. Fiske, M. C., July 7, 1918, to March 5, 1919.

  CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Col. E. H. Fiske, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Henry M. Moses, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 38l

Base Hospital No. 38 was organized in April, 1917, at the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., and was mobilized October 15, 1917, at Philadelphia, Pa., where it remained in training until June 21, 1918. The unit embarked on the Nopatkin, from Hoboken, June 22 and arrived at Brest,  

kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 37, A. E. F.," by 1st Lieut. Arthur Springer, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed. lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 38, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of the hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


665

France, June 5, 1918. It arrived at Nantes, Loire Inferieur, base section No. 1, July 11, 1918, and occupied a set of wooden type A barracks. Base Hospital No. 38 was the second unit to arrive at Nantes, where it later formed a part of the hospital center there.

The hospital began receiving patients 11 days after its arrival. The normal bed capacity was 1,000, but during an emergency, when as high as 2,413 cases were under treatment, a number of ward buildings of an adjoining, unoccupied hospital were taken over. It received both medical and surgical cases; the total number treated during its activity, July 22, 1918, to January 26, 1919, was 7,434.

On January 25, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 31 relieved Base Hospital No. 38. The latter organization sailed from St. Nazaire on the Freedom, April 13, 1919, and arrived in the United States April 28, 1919. The unit was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., on May 7, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. John S. Lambie, M. C., September 20, 1917, to September 2, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. John E. Lowman, M. C., September 3, 1918, to February, 1919.
    Maj. John R. Forst, M. C., February, 1919, to May 7, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Charles F. Nassau, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Col. William M. L. Coplin, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 39

Base Hospital No. 39 was changed to Mobile Hospital No. 39, soon after its arrival in France, and never functioned as a base hospital. Since it operated with troops at the front, its activities are recorded in Volume VIII (p. 191) of this history.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 40m

Base Hospital No. 40 was organized in June, 1917, at the Good Samaritan Hospital, Lexington, Ky., and was mobilized there February 23, 1918. March 1, 1918, it was transferred to Camp Taylor, Ky., where the personnel were assigned to the local base hospital for training until June 18. On that date, the organization entrained for Camp Mills, N. Y. It embarked at Hoboken, N. J., July 6, and sailed the same day on the Scotian, arriving at Glasgow, Scotland, July 17. It proceeded from Glasgow by train to the American rest camp at Southampton, England, arriving July 19, and leaving July 22 for Sarisbury Court, England, its permanent station. Upon arrival there a majority of the personnel were detached and assigned to duty in English and American hospitals in England and France. The unit was scattered and never at any time functioned as a whole. At Sarisbury Court the remainder of the organi-
 

mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 40, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. David Barrow, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


666

zation took over a mansion house of about 170-bed capacity and converted it into a hospital. Patients were not received until September 27, 1918. Additional wards were being built, but after the signing of the armistice, all construction was stopped. The normal bed capacity was 500, but on December 31, 1918, there were available 800 beds. The operating room, laboratory, and X-ray plant were not completed until December. The total number of sick and wounded treated in this hospital was 1,300.

Base Hospital No. 40 ceased to function on February 24, 1919, and the organization sailed from Brest, France, on the Aquitania, March 23, 1919. It arrived in New York March 30, and was demobilized at Camp Taylor, Ky., April 16, 1919.

FIG. 138.-Contagious disease ward, Base Hospital No. 40, Sarisbury Court, Hants, England

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Leonard S. Hughes, M. C., March 26, 1918, to February 25, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. David Barrow, M. C., February 26, 1919, to April 16, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. David Barrow, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Julian T. McClymonds, M. C.


667

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 41n

Base Hospital No. 41 was organized in August, 1917, at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, and was mobilized there February 26, 1918. On March 5, 1918, the organization proceeded to Camp Sevier, S. C., where it was trained at the camp base hospital for three months. On June 18, the unit proceeded to Camp Mills, N. Y. It sailed for Europe July 6, on the Scotian; arrived at Glasgow, Scotland, July 17; departed the following day by rail for Southampton, England; sailed for Le Havre, France, July 22; and left the latter port by rail for Paris on July 23.

FIG. 139.-A view of the grounds, Base Hospital No. 41, St. Denis, Paris

The hospital arrived in Paris July 25, 1918, and was assigned to station at St. Denis, Seine, occupying the buildings and grounds of the l'École de la Legion d'Honneur, where it functioned under the jurisdiction of the surgeon of the district of Paris. The school was converted into a hospital of 1,000-bed capacity and began receiving patients on August 16, 1918. Later the capacity of the hospital was increased by the construction of a number of wooden barracks and the erection of 52 marquee and 13 double Bessonneau tents; the chapel and hallways of the school were also converted into wards. With these additions the capacity of the hospital was increased to 2,900 beds. During its activity, August 16, 1918, to January 28, 1919, this hospital cared for 4,695 sick and wounded. From August 16, 1918, to October 7, 1918, it acted largely as an evacuation hospital, receiving patients directly from the front, where only first-aid treatment had been administered to them.

nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 41, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


668

Base Hospital No. 41 ceased to function January 28, 1919; the unit sailed from St. Nazaire April 13, 1919, on the Rijndam, arriving in New York April 25, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Lee, Va., May 7, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. J. M. Cabell, M. C., February 26, 1918, to May 7, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. William H. Goodwin, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Herbert Old, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 42o

Base Hospital No. 42 was organized in June, 1917, at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md., and on April 1, 1918, was mobilized at Camp Meade, Md., where it was trained and equipped. On June 20, 1918, the organization entrained for Camp Mills, N. Y., remaining there until June 27, 1918. On June 28, it left Hoboken, N. J., on the Metagama, for Liverpool, England. Arriving there July 10, it entrained immediately for Southampton; crossed the English Channel on the night of July 11; reached Cherbourg France, July 12; entrained the following day for Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department of Vosges, in the advance section, and arrived there on July 15, 1918. This was the fifth hospital to arrive at Bazoilles, where it became a part of the large hospital center there. The organization occupied one type A unit, which was nearly completed, and began receiving patients on July 19. This hospital was designated by the commanding officer of the center as a special hospital for maxillofacial cases; it received also all cases of mumps and measles. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,000 beds; but with crisis expansion in marquee tents, this was increased to 2,000 beds. During its period of activity, July 19, 1918, to January 8, 1919, the hospital treated 2,593 surgical and 4,559 medical cases.

On January 8, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 21 relieved Base Hospital No. 42; the latter organization proceeding on January 28 to the port of embarkation; sailed from St. Nazaire on the Santa Paula, April 8, 1919. It arrived in New York April 20, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Meade, Md., May 2, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Howard H. Johnson, M. C., April 1 to August 19, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. A. C. Harrison, M. C., August 20, 1918, to May 2, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. A. C. Harrison, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Carey B. Gamble, M. C.
    Capt. David C. Streett, M. C.
 

oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 42, A. E. F., by Lieut. Col. Archibald C. Harrison, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


669

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 43p

Base Hospital No. 43 was organized in June, 1917, at the Emory University, Atlanta, Ga., and was mobilized March 4, 1918, at Camp Gordon, Ga. After three months of training and equipping, the command left Camp Gordon for Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there June 4, 1918. On June 14 the unit embarked on the Olympic, leaving the same day for Southampton, England, arriving there on June 21. It crossed the English Channel the night of June 23; reached Le Havre, France, June 24; entrained at Le Havre, June 26, for Blois, Department Loire at Cher, in the intermediate section, and arrived at Blois on June 27. On July 3, it relieved Camp Hospital No. 25, and took over seven buildings that had been operated as a hospital by the latter organization. The buildings were widely scattered through the city, which necessitated the use of a greater number of personnel than would have been necessary otherwise. Each building functioned as a separate hospital, subject to the commanding officer, with definite commissioned and enlisted personnel and its quota of female nurses; but all patients arriving at the hospital passed through a main receiving ward.

 FIG. 140.-View of part of Base Hospital No. 43, Blois

When first taken over, the hospital had a normal bed capacity of 1,000 and an emergency capacity of 1,397. In September and October, 1918, several additional buildings were taken over from the French, and the normal capacity
 

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 43, A. E. F." by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


670

was increased to 2,025 beds; emergency expansion to 2,300 beds. For a time this hospital was used as a depot for casual nurses. During its period of activity, July 3, 1918, to January 20, 1919, 5,263 cases of disease and 4,002 of injury were treated.

On January 20, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 35 relieved Base Hospital No. 43, the latter organization leaving for the United States from St. Nazaire on March 12 on the Kroonland. It arrived at Newport News, Va., March 24, and was demobilized at Camp Gordon, Ga., shortly afterwards.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. S. U. Marietta, M. C., April 2, 1918, to January 31, 1919.
    Col. Clyde S. Ford, M. C., February 1 to February 26, 1919.
    Maj. John L. Haskins, M. C., February 27, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Frank K. Boland, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE   

Maj. John L. Haskins, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 44q

Base Hospital No. 44 was organized in March, 1917, at the Massachusetts Homeopathic Hospital, Boston, Mass., and was mobilized at Boston March 10, 1918. On March 12, it was transferred to Camp Dix, N. J., where it remained in training for four months. On July 6, the organization left Hoboken, N. J., on the Ulysses for Liverpool, England, and arrived there on July 17. The following day the command entrained for Southampton, arriving there on July 19. The English Channel was crossed on the night of July 22, and Le Havre, France, reached on July 23. On July 24 the unit proceeded by train to its final destination, Pougues-les-Eaux, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section, and arrived on July 26. Upon arrival at Pougues, the unit took over a number of hotels and various other buildings in that city and converted them into a hospital, although a great many alterations were necessary before they could be used as a hospital. The first patients were received on August 10.

This hospital functioned as a part of the Mesves hospital center, which was about 11 miles distant. On December 16, 1918, the hospital plant at Pougues was abandoned and the unit transferred to Mesves, where it occupied a set of type A barracks. The normal bed capacity of the hospital while at Pougues was 1,000, with an emergency expansion to 1,750. The largest number of patients under treatment at one time was in October, when 1,712 were being cared for. After its transfer to Mesves, the capacity of the hospital was reduced to 1,000 beds. Base Hospital No. 44 received both surgical and medical cases; a total of 3,681 sick and wounded were admitted during its period of activity.  
 

qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 44, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


671

On January 18, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 29 relieved Base Hospital No. 44. The latter organization returned to the United States from Brest April 7, 1919, on the Graf Waldersee; arrived in New York April 20, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., on May 2, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Robert H. Wilds, M. C., March 10, 1918, to February 1, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. William F. Wesselhoeft, M. C., February 2, 1919, to May 2, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

     Lieut. Col. William F. Wesselhoeft, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John H. Rockwell, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 45r

Base Hospital No. 45 was organized in July, 1917, at the Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va., and was mobilized in March, 1918, at Camp Lee, Va., where it was trained and equipped. The organization remained at Camp Lee until July, 1918, and then proceeded to Newport News, Va., whence it sailed, July 10, 1918, on the Aeolus, reaching Brest, France, July 21. On July 30 the command relieved Camp Hospital No. 47, at Autun, Department of Saone et Loire, where it took over the Caserne Billard, which was an old monastery that required much renovation. On August 19, this hospital site was abandoned and the unit transferred to Toul, Department of Meurthe-et-Moselle, in the advance section, where it became part of the Justice hospital center. At Toul Base Hospital No. 45 relieved Evacuation Hospital No. 14 and Field Hospital 355, taking over the Caserne La Marche and a contagious annex half a mile distant. These buildings were four stories high, without plumbing or lights, and required extensive overhauling.

On account of its advanced position Base Hospital No. 45 for many weeks functioned as an evacuation hospital; during the St. Mihiel operation the hospital received sick and wounded direct from the battle field. The bed capacity of the hospital was 2,300. During its period of activity, August 19, 1918, to January 29, 1919, the hospital treated 17,438 sick and wounded; of these, 5,241 were surgical, 1,379 gassed, and 10,818 medical cases.

On January 29, 1919, Base Hospital No. 82 relieved Base Hospital No. 45; the latter organization returned to the United States by way of St. Nazaire on the Walter A. Luckenbach, April 9, 1919. It arrived in the United States April 19, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Lee, Va., shortly afterwards.  

rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 45, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


672

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Alexander Williams, M. C., March 30, 1918, to August 10, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Stuart McGuire, M. C., August 11, 1918, to January 21, 1919.
    Maj. John G. Nelson, M. C., January 22, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. William L. Peple, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John G. Nelson, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 46s

Base Hospital No. 46 was organized in May, 1917, at the Medical Department of the University of Oregon, Portland, Oreg., and was mobilized, March 20, 1918, at Portland. On April 5, 1918, the unit was transferred to camp Lewis, Wash., for training and equipping. It remained at Camp Lewis until May 31, 1918, when it left for Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there June 5. On June 11, it sailed from New York for Liverpool on the Missenabia; arrived there on June 25; Southampton was reached on the 26th; the English Channel crossed, June 27; Cherbourg, France, was reached on June 28. On the following day the organization entrained for its final destination Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department of Vosges, in the advance section, and arrived there on July 2, 1918. This was the fourth hospital to arrive at Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, where it formed a part of the large hospital center there. It occupied a set of type A wooden barracks, which were not quite completed at the time of occupancy, and 72 sections of marquee tents. The capacity of the hospital was 1,000 beds in barracks and 1,000 in tents, making a total bed capacity of 2,000; this was later increased to 2,300. Patients were first received on July 23, 1918. The largest number of patients in hospital was on October 19, 1918, when 1,544 were under treatment.

Base Hospital No. 46 was designated by the commanding officer of the hospital center as a special hospital for neurosurgical cases. The operating room, on account of nonarrival of equipment, did not begin to function until a month after the opening of the hospital. The total number of patients treated in hospital was 8,366; 3,422 were surgical cases, with 620 operations, and 4,944 medical cases.

On January 19, 1919, all remaining patients were evacuated, and Base Hospital No. 46 ceased to function. The unit proceeded to St. Nazaire and sailed from that port, on the Finland, for Newport News, Va., on April 20, 1919, and arrived May 1, 1919. On May 15 the organization left for Camp Lewis, Wash., and was demobilized on May 21, 1919.
 

sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 46, A. E. F., by Lieut. Col. Robert C. Yenney, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital." The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O. Washington, D. C.-Ed.


673
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

   Col. W. R. Davis, M. C., April 1, 1918, to July 31, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. C. A. Betts, M. C., August 1, 1918, to August 31, 1918.
    Maj. Thomas M. Joyce, M. C., September 1, 1919, to October 1, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Robert C. Yenney, M. C., October 2, 1918, to May 21, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Thomas M. Joyce, M. C.
    Maj. William H. Skene, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut Col. Robert C. Yenney, M. C.
    Maj. William S. Knox, M. C.
    Maj. Otis B. Wight, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 47t

Base Hospital No. 47 was organized in June, 1917, at the San Fransisco Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., and was mobilized at Camp Fremont, Calif., December 5, 1917. After three months of training at Camp Fremont, the unit on March 2 was ordered to Camp Greenleaf, Ga., for further training, and remained at the latter camp until June 1, 1918. From there the command proceeded to Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., where another month was spent in drilling and preparation for oversea service. On July 5, the organization left for Hoboken, N. J., where, immediately upon arrival, it embarked on the Leviathan, leaving the following day, July 8, for Europe. It arrived at Brest, France, July 15, remained there in the rest camp for 12 days; entrained July 27, proceeded to its final destination, Beaune, Department Côte d'Or, in the advance section, and arrived there on July 31. It was the first medical organization to arrive at Baune, where it later formed a part of the hospital center there. The unit occupied a set of type A barracks, which were incomplete at the time of occupancy. The buildings were rapidly completed and furnished with such equipment as was available, and the hospital was ready to receive patients by September 1, 1918. The first convoy of patients arrived September 15. The normal bed capacity of hospital was 1,000, with a crisis expansion of 1,000 in marquee tents.

On January 23, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 22 relieved Base Hospital No. 47. The latter organization sailed from St. Nazaire April 13, 1919, on the Rijndam, arrived at Newport News, Va., April 25, 1919, and left for the Presidio of San Francisco, Calif., April 28, 1919, where it demobilized May 10, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. C. J. Manly, M. C., December 5, 1917, to August 12, 1918.
    Col. Charles G. Levison, M. C., August 13, 1918, to May 10, 1919.
 

tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 47, A. E. F., by Capt. Joseph Felsen, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital." The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


674

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

     Capt. S. A. Bunnell, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Harold Sidebotham, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 48u

Base Hospital No. 48 was organized in November, 1917, at the Metropolitan Hospital, New York City, N. Y. The unit was mobilized in New York City, March 6, 1918, and proceeded the same day to General Hospital No. 2, Fort McHenry, Md., where it was trained and equipped until June 20, when it was transferred to Camp Mills, N. Y. On July 4, the organization boarded the Aquitania at New York, and the following day sailed for Liverpool, England, arriving there July 12, 1918. It proceeded immediately by rail to Southampton, arrived July 13, crossed the English Channel the same night, reaching Le Havre, France, July 14. It entrained the following day for Roanne, Department of Loire Inferieure; however, after a stay there of a few days, the unit was ordered, July 24, to proceed to the Mars hospital center for duty. Arriving at Mars-sur-Allier, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section, July 25, it began to function as a part of that hospital center.

This hospital was the second medical organization to arrive at Mars. It occupied a set of type A barracks there, which were nearly completed when taken over. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,240 beds. The first convoy of patients arrived August 2, 1918; the total number of sick and wounded treated during the active service of the hospital was 4,822, of whom 2,960 were surgical cases, with 332 operations, and 1,862 medical cases.

On January 15, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 37 relieved Base Hospital No. 48, the latter organization leaving for Clisson, Department Loire Inferieure, February 14, where it rested for two months, awaiting transportation to the United States. It proceeded April 10, to St. Nazaire, leaving that port April 13, on the Freedom, and arrived in New York City, on April 28, 1919. The entire organization was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., by May 10, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. William D. Herbert, M. C., April 2, 1918, to February 1, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. W. F. Honan, M. C., February 2, 1919, to May 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. W. F. Honan, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Frederick M. Dearborn, M. C.
 

uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 48, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Frederick M. Dearborn, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


675

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 49v

Base Hospital No. 49 was organized in September, 1917, at the Nebraska University, Omaha, Nebr. The unit was mobilized in Omaha, Nebr., on March 25, 1918, and was transferred to Fort Des Moines, Iowa, where it trained until July 4, 1918. It then proceeded to Camp Mills, N. Y., and sailed July 14, 1918, for Liverpool, England, on the Karmalia, arriving there July 31. Thence it traveled by rail to Southampton and, crossing the channel, arrived at Cherbourg, France, August 3, 1918. It entrained for Allerey, Department of Saone et Loire, in the intermediate section, and arrived there August 5, being the third medical organization to arrive at that center. At Allerey the unit occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, which were found very incomplete, but by August 23 the hospital was ready for patients, and on August 26 received its first convoy of sick and wounded.

The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,000, with an emergency expansion of 1,000. The largest number of patients in hospital under treatment was on November 10, 1918, when 1,950 were being cared for.

Base Hospital No. 49 was designated by the commanding officer of the center as a special hospital for mental and nervous disorders. During its period of activity, August 26, 1918, to January 20, 1919, the hospital cared for 2,562 surgical cases (with 506 operations), 1,902 medical, and 430 gassed cases.

Base Hospital No. 49 ceased to function on January 20, 1919, and the organization sailed from Brest on the Manchuria, April 12, 1919, arriving in New York April 23, 1919. The unit was transferred May 4, to Camp Dodge, Iowa, where it was demobilized May 7, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Leopold Mitchell, M. C., March 30, 1918, to March 15, 1919.
    Maj. Chas. A. Hull, M. C., March 16, 1919, to May 7, 1919.
 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Arthur C. Stokes, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Edson L. Bridges, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 50w

Base Hospital No. 50 was organized in October, 1917, at the University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., and was mobilized on March 27, 1918, at Fort Lawton, Wash. On April 6 the organization was transferred to Camp Fremont, Calif., where it received three months of training at the camp base hospital. At the expiration of this time the unit left Camp Fremont for Camp
 

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 49, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 50, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


676

Merritt, N. J., arriving at the latter station on July 10. It boarded the Karmalia on July 13, and sailed from New York on the following day; arrived in Liverpool, England, July 31, 1918, leaving next day by rail for Southampton; crossed the English Channel on the night of August 2, arriving at Cherbourg, France, August 3; entrained the following day for Mesves, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section, and arrived August 6. It was the third organization to arrive at Mesves, where it functioned as a part of one of our largest and important hospital centers. The unit occupied a set of type A wooden barracks, many of which were found to be in a state of incompletion upon arrival. The first consignment of patients arrived on August 15.

This hospital received both surgical and medical cases and was a special hospital for compound fractures and joint injuries. The total number of sick and wounded treated was 7,399, with 1,135 operations. The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,000, with crisis expansion to 1,950.

All remaining patients on January 20, 1919, were transferred to Base Hospital No. 54, and Base Hospital No. 50 ceased to function on that date. The organization sailed from Brest on the Graf Waldersee, April 7, 1919, arrived in New York April 20, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Lewis, Wash., May 5, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Ray W. Bryan, M. C., April 8, 1918, to January, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Eugene H. Allen, M. C., January, 1919, to May 5, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. James B. Eagleson, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

   Maj. Edward P. Fick, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 51x

Base Hospital No. 51 was organized on February 18, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga. The first personnel were assigned to the hospital on April 10, 1918, when 200 recruits were sent from the recruit section, Camp Greenleaf, to the base hospital at Camp Wheeler, Ga., for a course of training. At Camp Wheeler the unit received its full quota of officers and enlisted men, and remained there in training until July 29, 1918. On July 31 the organization arrived at Camp Upton, N. Y.; boarded the Olympic August 8; sailed from New York Harbor the following day; arrived at Southampton, England, August 17; crossed the English Channel on the night of August 18; arrived at Cherbourg August 19. After spending three days in the rest camp at Cherbourg, the organization proceeded by rail to Rimaucourt, Department Haute Marne, in the advance section, where it was to have functioned as a part of the hospital center there. Arriving at Rimaucourt on August 24
 

xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 51, A. E. F.," by Second Lieut. Charles H. Ross, Sanitary Corps, while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


677

on the following day it was ordered to proceed to Toul, Department of Meurthe et Moselle, in the advance section, for duty. It entrained for Toul August 27, and arrived there on the same day.

It was the second base hospital to arrive at that station and functioned as a part of the Justice Hospital Center.

At Toul the organization was established in the "Caserne Febvier" which consisted of three large four-story buildings, two administration buildings, numerous storehouses, quarters and laundries. Although handicapped by the nonarrival of equipment and nurses, the hospital began to receive patients on September 5, 1918, a week after its arrival. Due to the advanced position, the hospital functioned during the early days of activities as an evacuation hospital, receiving patients by ambulance, direct from the front. The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 2,000. The total number of sick and wounded treated was 12,505. Of these 8,670 were medical, 3,231 surgical, 308 gassed, and 296 neurological cases.

Base Hospital No. 51 ceased to function on March 31, 1919, and the personnel sailed from Marseille May 15, 1919, on the Canada; arrived in the United States June 2, 1919, and the entire organization was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., by June 12, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Frederick A. Tucker, M. C., May 10, 1918, to January 22, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Daniel M. Hoyt, M. C., January 23, 1919, to February 17, 1919.
    Maj. Charles H. Wilson, M. C., February 18, 1919, to March 26, 1919.
    Maj. John C. Howard, M. C., March 27, 1919, to June 12, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. John C. Howard, M. C.
    Lieut. Col. Homer B. Smith, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Daniel M. Hoyt, M. C.
    Maj. George W. Miller, M. C.
    Lieut. Col. Harry W. Goodall, M. C.
    Lieut. Col. John G. Nelson, M. C.
    Capt. Richard S. Eustis, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 52y

Base Hospital No. 52 was organized at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from recruits of the recruit training battalion, at that station. The command was transferred April 11, 1918, to Camp Gordon, Ga., and there trained at the camp base hospital. It left Camp Gordon, July 5, arriving at Camp Merritt, N. J., July 7; embarked July 13 on the Karmalia, leaving New York harbor the follow-
 

yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 52, A. E. F.," by Col. David Baker, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


678

ing day, July 14, reaching Liverpool, England, July 31. On August 1, the unit proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the channel the following day, arriving at Cherbourg, France, August 3; entrained, August 5, for Rimaucourt, Department of Haute Marne, in the advance section, and arrived on August 8, 1918. It was the first medical organization to arrive at that station, and later functioned as a part of the Rimaucourt hospital center. The hospital was located in a section of type A unit, of 1,000 bed capacity, with additional 1,150 beds in marquee tents, making a total of 2,150 available beds. The first patient arrived September 14; the total number of sick and wounded treated was 6,388, of whom 3,327 were surgical and 2,128 medical cases.

Base Hospital No. 52 ceased to operate on January 22, 1919, and the unit sailed from St. Nazaire on the PrincessMatoika on April 14, 1919; arrived at Newport News, Va., April 27, and was demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, shortly afterward.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. David Baker, M. C., June 14, 1918, to March 20, 1919.
    Maj. Arthur F. Weyerbacker, M. C., March 21, 1919, to demobilization.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. William F. Verdi, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

   Lieut. Col. Willard C. Stoner, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 53z

Base Hospital No. 53 was organized on April 10, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from drafted enlisted personnel. On April 11, the entire command was transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga., where it was trained at the camp base hospital. On July 8, the unit left Camp Hancock for Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving on July 10; left New York harbor on the Karmalia, July 14, and reached Liverpool, England, July 31. It entrained the following day for Southampton; crossed the English Channel on the night of August 3; arrived at Cherbourg, France, August 4; entrained the following day for Langres, Department of Haute Marne, in the advance section; arrived August 7, 1918. It was the first hospital unit to arrive at Langres, where later it formed a part of that hospital center. The hospital occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, and began receiving patients on September 16, 1918. It received both medical and surgical cases; a total of 12,108 sick and wounded were treated during its period of activity, September 16, 1918, to March 16, 1919. The normal bed capacity in barracks was 1,000; 500 additional beds were in marquee tents.

Base Hospital No. 53 ceased to function May 31, 1919, and the unit proceeded to St. Nazaire, sailing thence, June 16, 1919, on the Julia Luckenbach. It arrived in New York, June 28, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, July 5, 1919.
 

zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 53, A. E. F.," by Col. W. Lee Hart, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


679

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Maj. Richard P. Bell, M. C., April 18, 1918, to May 8, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Daniel A. Sinclair, M. C., May 9, 1918, to November 5, 1918.
    Col. W. Lee Hart, M. C., November 6, 1918, to July 5, 1919.

 CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Albert Halstead, M. C.
    Capt. Joseph W. Hooper, M. C.

 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. M. S. Goodkind, M. C.
    Capt. Frank P. Strome, M. C.
    Maj. James M. Stoddard, M. C.

 BASE HOSPITAL NO. 54a

Base Hospital No. 54 was organized in May, 1918, at Camp Greene, N. C., from officers and enlisted men taken from the Army at large, and trained at the Camp Greene base hospital. August 7, 1918, the command was transferred to Newport News, Va.; left on the Patricia, August 14, 1918; arrived at Brest, France, August 25, 1918; remained at the rest camp until September 3, 1918, proceeded by rail to Mesves, Department of Nievre, intermediate section; arrived September 6, 1918. This was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at Mesves, where it functioned as a part of that hospital center. The hospital occupied a set of type A wooden barracks, and a number of marquee tents for crisis expansion. The normal bed capacity in barracks was 1,000 beds, with emergency expansion to 2,000. The first patients were received on September 12, 1918, and the hospital functioned from that date until April 13, 1919. The largest number of patients in hospital was October 26, 1918, when 2,288 were under treatment. On January 20, 1919, it took over patients and property of Base Hospital No. 50, the latter organization being relieved from further service.

The organization left St. Nazaire on the Dakotan, May 16, 1919; arrived in Philadelphia, May 28, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., May 30, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. William S. Sheep, M. C., May 2, 1918, to July 15, 1918.
    Col. Henry Page, M. C., July 16, 1918, to September 6, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Jonathan M. Wainwright, M. C., September 7, 1918, to March, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Thomas J. Burrage, M. C., March, 1919, to May 30, 1919.
 

aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 54, A. E. F., by Lieut. Col. Jonathan M. Wainwright, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


680

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Jonathan M. Wainwright, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Thomas J. Burrage, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 55b

Base Hospital No. 55 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., the enlisted personnel being assigned from the recruit section of that camp. The unit trained until August 22, 1918, when it proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived on August 24; embarked on the Plattsburg, August 29; sailed the following day, August 30, for France; arrived at Brest, France, September 12; remained in the rest camp until September 19; entrained for Mesves-sur-Loire, Department of Nievre; arrived September 23. Two days later, September 25, the unit was ordered to proceed to Toul, Department of Meurthe-et-Moselle, in the advance section, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center there. It arrived at Toul on September 25, and was the fifth medical organization to reach that station. It occupied the Caserne Thouvenat Annex, consisting of several one-story concrete barracks, located about a mile from the other hospitals of the center. In addition to the barracks, a number of marquee tents had been erected, bringing the normal capacity of the hospital up to 1,600 beds. The total number of sick and wounded treated during the period of activity of the hospital, October 1, 1918, to March 31, 1919, was 4,459; of these, 161 were surgical, 3,815 medical, and 483 gassed cases.

Base Hospital No. 55 ceased to function on March 31, 1919. The unit sailed from Marseille on the Canada, May 15, 1919, arrived in New York, June 2, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Pike, Ark., June 11, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Damon B. Pfeiffer, M. C., August 18, 1918, to February 3, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Franklin B. Balch, M. C., February 4, 1919, to February 18, 1919.
    Lieut. Col. Daniel M. Hoyt, M. C., February 19, 1919, to June 11, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Franklin B. Balch, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Daniel M. Hoyt, M. C.
    Capt. Burton Hamilton, M. C.
 

bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 55, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington D. C.-Ed.


681

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 56c

Base Hospital No. 56 was organized June 13, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from enlisted personnel of the recruit section of that camp. After several weeks of drilling the unit was transferred to the base hospital at Camp Wadsworth, S. C., for further training. On August 22 the organization entrained for Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived August 23; sailed from Hoboken, N. J., August 30, on the Kroonland, reached Brest, France, September 12, 1918; remained five days in the rest camp at Brest, France, and on September 18, 1918, entrained for Allerey, Department of Saone et Loire, in the intermediate section, its permanent station.

It arrived at Allerey on September 20 and was the fourth hospital to reach that station. Upon arrival the unit immediately began to function as a part of the Allerey hospital center, where it occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, which at that time were being operated by a subunit from Base Hospital No. 49, and had about 400 cases under treatment. The bed capacity of the hospital was 1,800, in barracks and tents. This hospital received both surgical and medical cases, and in addition received all genitourinary and contagious disease cases in the center. The total number of patients treated was 7,766.

Base Hospital No. 56 ceased to function February 1, 1919, and the personnel sailed from St. Nazaire for Newport News, Va., April 19, 1919, on the Mercury; arrived April 30, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., May 3, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. George M. Coates, M. C., July 25, 1918, to October 14, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Leopold Mitchell, M. C., October 15, 1918, to November 17, 1918.
    Col. Charles W. Decker, M. C., November 18, 1918, to May 3, 1919.
 

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Thomas C. Witherspoon, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. James D. Pilcher, M. C.
 

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 57d

Base Hospital No. 57 was organized April 2, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from enlisted men of the recruit section of that camp; a majority of these men were from a draft from Oil City, Pa. At Camp Greenleaf, the organization was trained until July 21, when it proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there on July 23. On July 31, the unit embarked on the Madingo;

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 56, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 57, A. E. F.," by Col. Edward C. Mitchell, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


682

sailed on August 1, for Liverpool, England; arrived August 15, and the following morning entrained for Southampton, where it spent three days in the rest camp. On August 20 it embarked on the Londonderry and crossed the English Channel; reached Le Havre, France, August 21; left Le Havre, August 23, for Juilly, Department Seine et Marne; arrived on the same date. There, the unit took over the hospital operated by Evacuation Hospital No. 8, which had about 250 patients, mostly French battle casualties. The unit remained at Juilly until September 16, 1918, when it was ordered to Paris to establish a 1,000-bed hospital.

FIG. 141.-Base Hospital No. 57, Paris

In Paris, Base Hospital No. 57 took over a large school building and functioned there as a part of the Paris district. There the normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,800, distributed in 75 wards; but during October, 1918, as many as 2,000 sick and wounded were in the hospital. This hospital admitted both surgical and medical cases; the total number admitted was 8,505. The hospital also operated a central dental infirmary, which cared for a majority of the dental cases in the district of Paris; 7,292 such patients received treatment during its period of activity.

It sailed from Brest, France, August 13, 1919, and arrived in the United States August 22, 1919, aboard the KaiserineAugusta Victoria, and was demobilized shortly afterwards.


683

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Edward C. Mitchell, M. C., April 2, 1918, to August 22, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Frank D. Smythe, M. C.
    Maj. David M. Henning, M. C.
    Lieut. Col. Junius Lynch, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Theodore L. Boutillier, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 58e

Base Hospital No. 58 was organized on June 3, 1918, at Camp Grant, Ill., from recruits of the Army at large. The unit was trained at that camp until August 16, 1918, when it left for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived, August 18; sailed for France, August 23, on the Chicago, and arrived at Bordeaux, France, September 5, 1918. It remained in the rest camp there until September 8, when it entrained for Rimaucourt, Department Haute Marne, in the advance section, and arrived September 12, 1918. It was the second hospital to arrive at Rimaucourt, where it functioned as a part of that hospital center. It occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, of 1,000-bed capacity; and 1,000 beds were available in marquée tents. It was designated as a special hospital for respiratory infectious diseases only. It had every bed cubicled, and no one was allowed to enter the wards of this hospital unmasked. The first patients were received September 20, 1918; during its activity the hospital admitted 4,588 cases.

The hospital ceased to function on January 25, 1919, and the unit sailed from St. Nazaire April 14, 1919, on the Matoika; arrived at Newport News, Va., April 27, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., May 5, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. William H. Walsh, M. C., June 3, 1918, to November 1, 1918.
    Col. David A. Baker, M. C., November 2, 1918, to November 26, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. John W. Barksdale, M. C., November 27, 1918, to May 5, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. John W. Barksdale, M. C.
    Maj. Clarence B. Ingraham, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. David H. Haller, M. C.
    Capt. Guy D. Griggs, M. C.
 

eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 58, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. John W. Barksdale, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


684

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 59f

Base Hospital No. 59 was organized in April, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from enlisted men of the recruit section of that camp and officers from the Medical Reserve Corps at large. The unit was transferred to the base hospital at Camp Shelby, Miss., for training. It left Camp Shelby August 28, arriving at Camp Stewart, Newport News, Va., August 31; embarked on September 6 on the Madawaska; sailed from Norfolk, Va., September 8; arrived at Brest, France, September 21, 1918; remained in the rest camp until September 29; left by rail for its final destination, Rimaucourt, Department of Haute Marne, in the advance section; arrived October 1. It was the fourth hospital to reach that station, where it functioned as a part of the Rimaucourt hospital center. It occupied a section of type A wooden barracks of 1,000-bed capacity, with an additional 1,000 beds in marquée tents. This hospital received only medical and gas cases. The first patients arrived October 8, 1918; the largest number of patients in hospital at one time was in October, 1918, when 1,660 were being cared for.

Base Hospital No. 59 ceased to function May 31, 1919, and the unit sailed from Marseille June 12, 1919, on the Taormina; arrived in the United States June 27, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 13, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Irvin Abell, M. C., April 16, 1918, to April 16, 1919.
    Maj. Llewellyn P. Spears, M. C., April 17, 1919, to July 13, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Benjamin F. Zimmerman, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Sidney J. Meyers, M. C.
    Maj. Llewellyn P. Spears, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 60g

Base Hospital No. 60 was organized in April, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from enlisted men of the recruit section at that camp and officers from the Army at large. The unit was transferred April 14, 1918, to the base hospital at Camp Jackson, S. C., for training. August 11 the unit proceeded to Newport News, Va.; arrived the following day; remained at Camp Stewart, Va., until August 22; left on that date for Europe on the Dante Aleghiers; arrived at Brest, France, September 3; remained in the rest camp until September 11; departed for its permanent station in the hospital center at Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department of the Vosges, advance section; arrived September 15. It was
 

fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 59, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 60, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


685

the fifth unit to reach that station and occupied a section of type A wooden barracks of 1,000-bed capacity, with additional 1,000 beds in marquee tents.

The hospital opened for patients October 5, and during its period of activity treated 3,684 medical and 2,304 surgical cases, with 334 operations. On March 31, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred to other hospitals in the center, and Base Hospital No. 60 ceased to function on that date. The unit sailed from St. Nazaire June 15, 1919, on the Texan; arrived in United States June 29, and was demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, July 2, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. H. L. Dale, M. C., May 26, 1918, to April 23, 1919.
    Maj. J. M. Hutcheson, M. C., April 24, 1919, to July 2, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. E. P. Quain, M. C.
    Maj. Martin A. Reddan, M. C.
    Capt. Harold K. Bell, M. C.
 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. James M. Hutcheson, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 61h

Base Hospital No. 61 was organized June 5, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from recruits of the Army at large, and was transferred, June 30, to the Base hospital at Camp Lee, Va., remaining there in training until August 21, when it was ordered to Newport News, Va., for embarkation. It arrived on August 22; embarked and sailed on the same day, on the Lutetia, for Brest, France; arrived September 3; rested at Brest for a week, and then proceeded to its final destination, Beaune, Department Côte d'Or, in the advance section; arrived September 13. It was the second hospital unit to arrive at Beaune, where it formed a part of the Beaune hospital center. The unit occupied a section of type A wooden barracks of 1,000-bed capacity, with additional 600 beds in marquee tents.

The first convoy of patients was received October 5, 1918. The largest number of patients in hospital was on October 31, when 1,490 were being treated. During its period of activity, October 5, 1918, to January 31, 1919, the hospital admitted 1,183 medical and 1,626 surgical cases, with 555 operations. The dental department of the hospital performed all the dental work for the entire hospital center.

January 31, 1919, all remaining patients were transferred to other hospitals in the center, and Base Hospital No. 61 ceased to function as a hospital. The unit sailed from St. Nazaire April 9, 1919, on the Luckenbach, arrived in New York April 19, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., April 27, 1919.
 

hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 61, A. E. F.," by Maj. Royale H. Fowler, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


686

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Charles S. Lawrence, M. C., June 5, 1918, to April 27, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Charles A. Stevens, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Bernard S. Oppenheimer, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 62i

Base Hospital No. 62 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from recruits of the Army at large. On June 29, the organization was transferred to Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y., for further training at the base hospital of that camp. The unit left Camp Upton, August 29, for the port of embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., where it boarded the NorthernPacific, for Brest, France; arrived September 7; disembarked the following day and remained for eight days in the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks awaiting orders; entrained at Brest, September 16, for its final destination, Mars-sur-Alliers, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section; arrived September 19, 1918. It was the fifth medical organization to arrive at Mars, where it formed a part of the large hospital center there. The hospital occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, with normal capacity of 1,000 beds, and began to receive patients on October 5; 791 were admitted on that date.

During its period of activity, October 5, 1918, to February 15, 1919, the organization cared for 3,631 sick and wounded; of these, 3,232 were medical and 399 surgical cases.

On February 15, 1919, Base Hospital No. 62 ceased to function as a hospital. Subsequently the unit proceeded to St. Nazaire and sailed from that port May 17, 1919, on the Antigone, for Newport News, Va.; arrived May 29, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., June 7, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Capt. Rufus H. Fisher, M. C., June 13, 1918, to August 2, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. Richard L. Cook, M. C., August 3, 1918, to June 7, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Herbert B. Perry, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. David Bovaird, M. C.
 

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 62, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


687

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 63j

Base Hospital No. 63 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from enlisted men of the recruit section of that camp, and was transferred June 30, to Camp McClellan, Ala., for further mobilization and training. The unit trained at the base hospital at Camp McClellan until August 19, when it proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J., for embarkation; sailed from Hoboken, N. J., on the Leviathan, August 31; arrived at Brest, France, September 7; debarked the following day and marched to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks, where it remained awaiting orders; September 12 it proceeded to Caen, Department of Calvados, base section No. 4, and arrived September 13. It was the first American organization to arrive at Caen and was to function as an independent hospital. The unit took over a large stone building, and proceeded to convert it into a hospital. By the end of September, 1918, it was ready to receive patients, with a bed capacity of about 300, but no patients were ever sent there. In October and November, 1918, part of the unit was ordered on detached service in different hospitals, and the building in which the hospital operated was ordered abandoned. On December 15 the unit was ordered to proceed to Chateauroux, Department of Indre, where it relieved Base Hospital No. 9. It arrived at Chateauroux January 3, 1919, and assumed operation of the hospital on January 14, 1919.

On March 21, 1919, Base Hospital No. 63 ceased to function as a hospital and all of the personnel, with the exception of the commanding officer, 1 noncommissioned officer, and 3 privates, were transferred to Camp Hospital No. 109 for duty. The skeletonized unit sailed from Brest April 16, 1919, and arrived at Hoboken, N. J., April 25, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Col. Charles Willcox, M. C., June 1, 1918, to March 21, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. Lucius E. Burch, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. William D. Alsever, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 64k

Base Hospital No. 64 was organized June 5, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from enlisted men of the recruit section at that camp. The unit was transferred June 28, to Camp Sevier, S. C., where it was trained at the camp base hospital. The organization left Camp Sevier August 19; proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived August 21; departed from port of embarkation Hoboken, N. J., on the Belgic, September 1; arrived at Liverpool, England,
 

jThe statement of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 63, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed
k
The statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 64, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Roy T. Morris, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


688

September 13; proceeded by rail to Southampton and crossed the English Channel on September 16; reached Cherbourg, France, September 17. It entrained the following day for its final destination, Rimaucourt, Department Haute Marne, in the advance section of the American Expeditionary Forces; arrived September 21. This was the third hospital unit to arrive at Rimaucourt, where it occupied a section of type A wooden barracks and functioned as a part of that hospital center. The normal capacity of that hospital was 1,000 beds in barracks, with additional 1,500 beds in marquee tents. This hospital was designated to receive all gas cases and infected surgical cases for the center. The number of patients admitted from October 4, 1918, to January 28, 1919, was 3,395.

The hospital ceased to function on April 21, 1919, and the unit was transferred to Brest, France, for return to the United States; sailed June 9, 1919, on the Vermont for Newport News, Va.; arrived June 20, 1919, and the entire organization was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., June 25, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Roy T. Morris, M. C., June 5, 1918, to June 25, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

    Lieut. Col. William B. Reid, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

    Maj. Joseph H. Cattons, M. C.
    Maj. Charles O. Moore, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 65l

Base Hospital No. 65 was organized in March, 1918, at Fort McPherson, Ga., from enlisted men of the Army at large; the majority of these men were from the State of North Carolina. The organization was trained at Fort McPherson, and received special instructions at General Hospital No. 6 there. On August 9 the unit was ordered to Camp Upton, N. Y., where it arrived the following day; left August 29 for Hoboken, N. J.; sailed August 30 on the Kroonland; arrived at Brest, France, September 12; remained in the rest camp at Brest until September 16, when it was ordered to proceed to the Kerhuon hospital center near by for duty.

The hospital ceased to function July 15, 1919, and the unit sailed from Brest for New York July 30, 1919, on the Leviathan; arrived August 6, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Lee, Va., August 13, 1919.

 PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

    Lieut. Col. Frederick M. Hanes, M. C., March, 1918, to July 26, 1918.
    Lieut. Col. W. E. Butler, M. C., July 27, 1918, to October 31, 1918.    
    Lieut. Col. Frederick M. Hanes, M. C., November 1, 1918, to April 12, 1919.     
    Lieut. Col. J. B. Anderson, M. C., April 13, 1918, to June 26, 1919.     
    Lieut. Col. Leopold Mitchell, M. C., June 27, 1919, to July 15, 1919. 

lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 65, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


689

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE
   Lieut. Col. John W. Long, M. C.
 CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE   Lieut. Col. Frederick M. Hanes, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 66m

Base Hospital No. 66 was organized November 6, 1917, at Camp Merritt, N. J., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. It was the first base hospital organized from the Regular Army and was designated as a genitourinary hospital; its commissioned personnel were selected with that point in view. The unit underwent extensive training at Camp Merritt, N. J., for a period of one month, and on December 17, 1917, embarked at New York on the Orduna; left port on the following day, December 18, for Halifax, Nova Scotia, where it remained for two days; sailed for Glasgow, Scotland; arrived December 31, 1917. From Glasgow the organization proceeded to the rest camp at Winchester, England; remained until January 14, 1918; left for Southampton, England; crossed the English Channel on the night of January 14; landed at Le Havre, France, January 15. On the following day the unit proceeded by rail to its permanent station at Neufchateau, Department Vosges, advance section, and arrived January 18, 1918.

It took over a 500-bed hospital located at the Rebeval Barracks, just outside of Neufchateau, which at that time was being operated by Field Hospitals Nos. 101 and 104, of the 26th Division. These barracks were typical old French casernes, unsuitable for hospitalization. Base Hospital No. 66 assumed charge of the hospital, which contained about 500 patients, on January 19, 1918, and began operations under very trying circumstances.

Shortly after the arrival of the unit the hospital was brought up to an efficient status and its capacity increased from 500 to 2,600 beds. Base Hospital No. 66 operated independently of any hospital until August 11, 1918, when it was placed under the hospital center at Bazoilles; but on November 10, 1918, it was again made independent.

Up to June, 1918, very few battle casualties were received. Practically all of the patients admitted up to that time were from organizations stationed around Neufchateau. During the time the unit functioned as a part of the hospital center at Bazoilles it admitted 6,913 surgical and medical cases. Although this unit was organized as a special hospital for venereal and genitourinary work, it never functioned as such.

Base Hospital No. 66 ceased to operate on December 31, 1918, and returned to the United States, sailing from St. Nazaire on the Princess Matoika January 30, 1919. It arrived at Newport News, Va., February 11, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., shortly afterwards.

mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 66, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


690

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. H. C. Maddux, M. C., November 6, 1917, to June 17, 1918.
Capt. Blase Cole, M. C., June 18, 1918, to October 13, 1918. Maj. Robert B. Hill, M. C., October 14, 1918, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

         Lieut. Col. Macy Brooks, M. C. 

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. George B. Wallace, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 67n

Base Hospital No. 67 was organized in April, 1918, at Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. This hospital was originally organized as a genitourinary unit, and its personnel were selected with that point in view. Later it was decided that such a unit was not required abroad, and some alterations in the organization were made. The unit was trained at Camp Crane, Pa., until July 5, when it proceeded to Hoboken, N. J.; sailed from that port on the Leviathan, July 8. It arrived at Brest, France, July 15, remained encamped near Pontanezen Barracks for two weeks. On July 29 the organization was ordered to Mesves, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section, where it arrived August 1, and immediately began to function as a part of the hospital center there. It was the first medical unit to arrive at Mesves, where it occupied a set of type A wooden barracks. The organization found 400 surgical cases in the wards of the hospital, who had been received just an hour prior to its arrival at Mesves. It immediately took hold of the work and in a few hours made itself ready for self-sustainment. On the following day, 600 additional wounded arrived; thus within 24 hours this hospital had a total of 1,075 patients, largely seriously wounded men from the Chateau-Thierry operation.

The first few days the hospital staff was greatly handicapped by the lack of adequate equipment to perform surgical work. The normal capacity of hospital was 1,000 beds in barracks, with an additional 1,000 in marquee tents. During the early part of October, 1918, as many as 2,370 patients were in the hospital; beds and cots were placed in warehouses, Red Cross huts,  and every other available space. During its period of activity, August 1, 1918, to January 20, 1919, the hospital received 7,853 surgical and medical cases.

On January 20, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 24, took over patients of Base Hospital No. 67, the latter organization returning to the United States. Leaving St. Nazaire April 14, 1919, on the Princess Matoika for Newport News, Va., it arrived in United States April 27, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., and Camp Sherman, Ohio, by May 3, 1919.

nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 67, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. H. O. Reik, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


691

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. William Herschel Allen, M. C., April 26, 1918, to October 18, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Henry O. Reik, M. C., October 18, 1918, to February, 1919.
Maj. Thomas E. Chandler, M. C., February, 1919, to May 3, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. John A. Hawkins, M. C.
Maj. Jesse T. McDavid, M. C. Maj. A. R. Stevens, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. H. Nall, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 68o

Base Hospital No. 68 was organized in April, 1918, at Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization underwent training at that camp until July 7, when the unit proceeded to the port of embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., arriving there and boarding the Leviathan the same day. It sailed from Hoboken the following day, July 8; arrived at Brest, France, July 15, 1919; marched to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks, where it remained until July 22; entrained at Brest for its final destination, Mars-sur-Allier, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section; arrived July 24. The unit occupied a set of type A wooden barracks, and began receiving patients on August 2. It was the first hospital unit to arrive at Mars, where it formed a part of the hospital center there.

The primary normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,000; later, however, another section of barracks was taken over by the hospital and the capacity was increased to 3,500 beds, with an emergency expansion to 4,000. It received both surgical and medical cases; the number admitted from August 2, 1918, to November 20, 1918, was 7,021.

On January 20, 1919, Base Hospital No. 131 took over patients and property of Base Hospital No. 68, the latter organization then ceasing to function as a hospital. The unit proceeded to St. Nazaire, from which port it sailed April 14, 1919, on the Princess Matoika for Newport News, Va., arriving in the United States April 27, 1919. Upon arrival at Newport News, the unit was split up and sent to Camp Dix, N. J., and Camp Sherman, Ohio, for demobilization. The entire unit was demobilized by May 5, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. Roy C. Heflebower, M. C., April 17, 1918, to January 22, 1918.
Maj. Robert N. Severance, M. C., January 23, 1919, to May 5, 1919.

oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 68, A. E. F.," by Col. Scott D. Breckinridge, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


692
 

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Elizah H. Sitar, M. C.
Lieut. Col. A. E. Halstead, M. C. Maj. Robert N. Severance, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Walter H. Wood, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 69p

Base Hospital No. 69 was organized June 11, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit was transferred to Camp Meade, Md., June 30, for training. On August 26, the organization entrained for the port of embarkation, Hoboken, N. J.; embarked on the Susquehanna, sailing August 30, for overseas service; arrived at Brest, France, September 12; proceeded to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks; remained there awaiting orders until September 20, and entrained for its final destination, Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, in the base section No. 5, where it arrived September 21. It was the second unit to arrive at that station and immediately began to function as a part of the Savenay hospital center. The organization was assigned to a hospital plant consisting of 68 buildings, of the knock-down wooden barrack type, of which 55 had been completed. The bed capacity was 2,500, and some of the wards were already filled with patients when the unit arrived.

While originally designated to receive venereal cases and, later, urological surgical cases, the demands had been such that the hospital cared for the average type of patient of the more serious class evacuated to that center. During its period of activity, September 21, 1918, to June 7, 1919, over 15,000 sick and wounded patients were admitted to the hospital.

On January 31, 1919, the unit took over Base Hospital No. 8, the latter organization being ordered to prepare for return to the United States at the same time. Base Hospital No. 88 took over the hospital plant and patients of Base Hospital No. 69.

On June 7, 1919, the hospital was formally closed, and the unit sailed from St. Nazaire July 6, 1919, on the Scranton; arrived in the United States July 16, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Grant, Ill., July 21, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. Scott D. Breckinridge, M. C., July, 1918, to June 15, 1919.
Maj. Walter C. G. Kirchner, M. C., June 16, 1919, to July 21, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Jonathan E. Burns, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Oliver H. P. Pepper, M. C.
 

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 69, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


693

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 70q

Base Hospital No. 70 was organized May 29, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The majority of the enlisted men were casuals from the Medical Officers' Training Camp at Fort Riley, and had been inducted into the service from the State of Oklahoma in May, 1918. June 17 the organization was transferred to Fort Ontario, N. Y., and was trained at General Hospital No. 5 there. The unit left Fort Ontario, September 2, for the port of embarkation, Hoboken, N. J.; arrived September 3; embarked on the Siboney, September 4; sailed on the same day for St. Nazaire, France; arrived at St. Nazaire, September 13; disembarked and marched to Rest Camp No. 1, where it remained one week awaiting orders; entrained September 19 for Allerey, Department of Saone et Loire, in the intermediate section, and reached that station on September 22. This was the fifth hospital unit to arrive at Allerey, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. The unit occupied a section of wooden, type A barracks, and began to receive patients on October 4.

When organized this unit was designated as a venereal hospital, but on arrival in France it did not function as such but received both surgical and medical cases.

In October, 1918, a part of the personnel was detached and organized into a subsidiary unit, called 70A. The bed capacity of hospital was 1,500, with an emergency expansion to 2,200, while that of 70A was 1,700. The largest number of patients cared for at one time was 1,448, on November 11, in Base Hospital No. 70, and 1,432 on November 14, in 70A. The total number of patients treated was 5,371. On December 17 unit 70A was taken over by Base Hospital No. 97 and the personnel returned to Base Hospital No. 70.

Base Hospital No. 70 ceased to function on February 4, 1919, and the unit sailed from St. Nazaire, April 13, 1919, on the Freedom, arriving at New York, April 28, 1919. The entire unit was demobilized at Camp Pike, Ark., May 14, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. T. Victor Keen, M. C., July 18, 1918, to October 16, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Leopold Mitchell, M. C., October 17, 1918, to December 8, 1918. 
Maj. Hugh S. Willson, M. C., December 9, 1918, to March, 1919.
Maj. Arthur D. West, M. C., March, 1919, to May 14, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Alexander Peacock, M. C.
Lieut. Col. Levi L. Reggin, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Hugh S. Willson, M. C.
Maj. John J. Cunningham, M. C.

qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 70, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of the hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


694

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 71r

Base Hospital No. 71 was organized July 13, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization was transferred, August 17, to Camp Beauregard, La., where it underwent training. On October 26, the unit was ordered to Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y.; arrived October 29; remained until November 10; proceeded to New York and boarded the Empress of Asia; sailed, November 12, for France; arrived at Brest, France, November 22; encamped at Pontanezen Barracks, and remained there awaiting orders until November 29; proceeded by rail to Pau, Department Basses Pyrenees, base section No. 2, and arrived December 1, 1918. It was the first hospital unit to arrive at Pau, where it was to function as a part of what was to be a small hospital center. The organization took over from the French four hotels and one school building, and made preparations to convert them into a hospital. On December 30, before any patients were admitted to the center, hospitalization at Pau was abandoned and Base Hospital No. 71 was transferred, January 11, 1919, to Vauclaire, Department of Dordogne, base section No. 2, to relieve Base Hospital No. 3.

On January 20, the unit took over patients and property of Base Hospital No. 3, and immediately began to function as a hospital. There were about 400 patients in the hospital when the unit took charge, and during its two months of active service at Vauclaire, 167 patients were admitted.

Base Hospital No. 71 ceased to function on March 20, 1919; part of the unit was transferred to other stations for duty, and the remainder returned to the United States, sailing from Bordeaux, May 12, on the Panaman. It arrived in the United States May 23, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Shelby, Miss., May 31, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Henry Abraham, M. C., August 26, 1918, to September 28, 1919.
Col. Alexander C. Abbott, M. C., September 29, 1918, to January 26, 1919 Maj. George W. Schwartz, M. C., January 27, 1919, to March 31, 1919.
First Lieut. John R. Ransom, M. C., April 1, 1919, to May 31, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Clarence Martin, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Henry Abrahm, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 72s

Base Hospital No. 72 was organized August 15, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization was transferred to Camp Gorden, Ga., and there trained at the camp base hospital.

rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 71, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 72, A. E. F.," by Maj. Clarence M. Dollman, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


695

On October 19, the unit entrained for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y.; arrived October 21; on October 26, it proceeded to New York; embarked on the Maunganui; sailed on October 27 for Liverpool, England; arrived November 8; proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel and reached Le Havre, France, November 11. The organization remained in the rest camp at Le Havre until November 26, on which date it entrained for its final destination, the Mesves hospital center. It arrived at Mesves, Department of Nievre, intermediate section, November 27; was assigned to a section of type A wooden barracks. The hospital received some class A patients (men ready for duty) on December 5, but during its active service at Mesves only 69 medical cases were admitted.

The hospital ceased to function on February 6, 1919; the unit was transferred March 20, 1919, to Brest, from which port it sailed on April 7, 1919, on the Graf Waldersee; arrived at Hoboken, N. J., April 20, 1919, and passed out of existence at Camp Merritt, N. J., shortly afterwards.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Clarence M. Dollman, M. C., August 25, 1918, to February 26, 1919.
Maj. Albert M. Meads, M. C., February 27, 1919, to March 20, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Lipman M. Kahn, M. C., March 21, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Victor N. Meddis, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

            Maj. Albert M. Meads, M. C.
 

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 76t

Base Hospital No. 76 was organized June 4, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization was transferred, June 29, 1918, to Camp Devens, Mass., where it arrived July 1, and remained there in training until August 31. On September 1 the organization sailed from New York harbor; arrived at Liverpool, England, September 13; disembarked and marched to the rest camp at Knotty Ash; remained in the rest camp until September 18; proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel the night of September 19; reached Le Havre, France, September 20; entrained at Le Havre, September 21, for its final destination, the Vichy hospital center, Department of Allier, in the intermediate section, and arrived September 23.

Base Hospital No. 76 was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center there. The unit was assigned 18 hotels in Vichy, and proceeded to convert them into hospital wards. The first ward was opened for patients October 7, and by November 6 all buildings were receiving patients.

tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 76, A. E. F.," by First Lieut. Horace Gray, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


696

The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,500. The greatest number of sick and wounded in hospital at one time on November 30, when 1,860 were under treatment. During its period of activity, October 7, 1918, to January 31, 1919, the hospital received 2,962 surgical and 2,251 medical cases.

Due to the fact that this hospital arrived late and was not fully equipped, it received only the slightly wounded and sick; in fact, nearly all its patients were walking cases.

Base Hospital No. 76 ceased to function on January 31, 1919, and the personnel sailed from Brest, April 13, 1919, on the Mobile, and arrived in New York April 23, 1919. Part of the unit was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., May 3, 1919, and the remainder at Camp Upton, N. Y., May 12, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. John McKowen, M. C., June 5, 1918, to August 11, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Lewis T. Griffith, M. C., August 12, 1918, to March 8, 1919. Maj. Albert B. Davis, M. C., March 9, 1919, to May 12, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Roy B. Canfield, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. I. I. Lemann, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 77u

Base Hospital No. 77 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On June 30 the organization was transferred to Camp Sherman, Ohio; arrived at that station July 1, and remained in training until August 27. The unit left Camp Sherman for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived August 29; embarked at New York on the Baltic August 31; sailed for Europe September 1; arrived at Liverpool, England, September 13; disembarked and proceeded by rail to Southampton and arrived the same day. On the following day the unit crossed the English Channel and landed at Le Havre, France, September 15. After spending two days at the rest camp, the organization entrained, September 17, for its final destination, Beaune, Department Côte d'Or, in the advance section, and arrived September 19.

It occupied a set of type A wooden barracks of 1,000-bed capacity, with 500 additional beds in Marquee tents. This was the third hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it formed a part of the Beaune hospital center, and began receiving patients on October 12. The hospital received both surgical and medical cases; the total number of patients admitted was 3,789, and of these, 3,505 were medical cases. Base Hospital No. 77 ceased to function March 6, 1919; part of the unit was converted into Camp Hospital No. 107, which functioned for the American University at Beaune, and another part was transferred to Allerey, where it operated Camp Hospital No. 108.

uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 77, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


697

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. James P. Kerr, M. C. (during its entire service as a base hospital).

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. H. C. Pitts, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. T. W. Grayson, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 78v

Base Hospital No. 78 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On June 30 the organization was transferred to Fort McHenry, Md., where it underwent training at General Hospital No. 2 there. On August 27 the unit entrained for Camp Merritt, N. J., thence after three days it proceeded to New York harbor; boarded the Anchises; left September 1; landed at Liverpool, England, September 13; marched to the rest camp at Knotty Ash, and remained there for four days. On September 17 the organization traveled by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel on the night of September 19; reached Le Havre, France, September 20; on the following day entrained for its final destination, the Justice hospital group, at Toul, Department of Meuthe-et-Moselle, in the advance section; arrived at Toul September 23, where it became a part of that hospital center. Base Hospital No. 78 was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at Toul and was assigned to the barracks of the French 1st Engineers. These barracks had a total capacity of 2,000 beds.

During the months of September and October, 1918, due to advanced position of the hospital, its activities were practically those of an evacuation hospital; the wounded were admitted directly from the field hospitals, and some were received from evacuation and mobile hospitals. This hospital was designated a surgical unit of the center, although during the influenza epidemic of the fall of 1918 a large number of medical cases were admitted. After January 30, 1919, the hospital cared for all genitourinary cases of the center. The first patients were admitted September 29. During its activity the hospital received 2,388 medical and 3,205 surgical cases, with 346 operations.

Base Hospital No. 78 ceased to function April 10, 1919, and its personnel sailed from Marseille for New York, May 29, 1919; arrived in the United States June 17, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., June 6, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. David A. Kraker, M. C., July, 1918, to February 6, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Robert Burns, M. C., February 7, 1919, to June 6, 1919.

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 78, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Robert Burns, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


698

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Alfred P. Roope, M. C.
Lieut. Col. Robert Burns, M. C. Maj. John B. Ferguson, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Albert J. Chatard, M. C.
Maj. Louis Poole, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 79w

Base Hospital No. 79 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization was transferred June 28, 1918, to Fort Des Moines, Iowa, for training. On September 2, 1918, the unit proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J., where it remained until September 15. It then sailed from Hoboken, N. J., on the Martha Washington, and arrived at Brest, France, September 28. It was assigned to temporary duty at Pontanezen Barracks, Brest, assisting Camp Hospital No. 33, during the influenza epidemic. On October 13, the organization entrained for its final destination, Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department Vosges, in the advance section, and arrived October 16. It was the eighth hospital unit to reach Bazoilles, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center there.

The unit was assigned a section of type A wooden barracks, of 1,000-bed capacity, with emergency expansion in marquee tents to 1,600 beds. This section was operated by the unit until January 31, 1919, on which date it took over patients and equipment of Base Hospital No. 116. In addition to this, a psychiatric unit that had been connected with Base Hospital No. 116 also was taken over by Base Hospital No. 79. This psychiatric department had been operating since July 20, 1918; it occupied 7 wooden barracks, with a capacity of 80 beds; had its own trained personnel, and operated its own mess. From the date of establishment, July 10, 1918, to April 30, 1919, this department admitted 1,562 cases.

Base Hospital No. 79 ceased to function on May 1, 1919; the unit sailed from St. Nazaire for Newport News, Va., on the Texan, June 15, 1919; arrived in the United States June 27; and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 12, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. W. L. Vroom, M. C., July 30, 1918, to March 16, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Arthur S. Pendleton, M. C., March 17, 1919, to July 12, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Walter W. Crawford, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Patrick J. McDonnell, M. C.

wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 79, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


699

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 80x

Base Hospital No. 80 was organized June 25, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The Unit was transferred to Camp Wheeler, Ga., and attached to the base hospital of that camp for instruction. September 12 it left Camp Wheeler; arrived at Camp Upton, N. Y., September 14, remained there five days, completing its equipment for overseas service. On September 19, the organization boarded the Agamemnon at Hoboken, N. J.; sailed September 20 for Europe; arrived at Brest, France, September 29; remained at Pontanezen Barracks on temporary duty at Camp Hospital No. 33 until October 6. On October 6, it proceeded to the hospital center at Beaune, for duty. It arrived at Beaune, Department of Côte d'Or, advance section, October 9.

Base Hospital No. 80 was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It occupied a set of type A wooden barracks, of 1,000-bed capacity, with emergency expansion in marquee tents to 1,500 beds. The first patients were received on October 19. During its service at Beaune, the hospital admitted 2,479 medical, and 868 surgical cases.

On February 22, 1919, the unit was ordered to transfer its patients to Base Hospital No. 77, and to proceed to the hospital center at Mars-sur-Allier, Department of Nievre, for further duty. The organization left for its station on February 24, and arrived the following day.

At Mars, the unit took over a hospital plant that had been operated by Evacuation Hospital No. 37, and prior to that by Base Hospital No. 48. During its service at Mars no patients were received by Base Hospital No. 80.

This organization ceased to function on March 27, 1919; its personnel sailed on the Santa Terese from St. Nazaire for New York, May 13, 1919; arrived in the United States May 24, 1919, and the entire organization was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., May 31, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. James A. Mattison, M. C., June 25, 1918, to May 31, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Frank C. Kinsey, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Maurice W. K. Byrne, M. C.
Capt. Charles E. Sears, M. C.

xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 80, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


700

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 81z

Base Hospital No. 81 was organized in February, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On June 14, the organization was transferred to Camp Travis, Tex., where the officers and enlisted men were assigned to duty at the base hospital of that camp for instruction. The unit left Camp Travis on August 17; arrived at Camp Merritt, N. J., August 20; completed its overseas equipment and embarked on the Leviathan August 28, and sailed from New York, August 31. It arrived at Brest, France, September 7; remained there on duty at Pontanezen Barracks until September 18; proceeded to Le Mans, Sarthe; remained for three days, receiving instructions in gas defense; left on September 22 for its final destination, Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department of Vosges, in the advance section; arrived September 25. This was the sixth hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. The unit occupied a section of type A wooden barracks with a normal bed capacity of 1,000. The first patients were received October 5, 1918; total number received during the active service of the hospital unit was 5,991, both surgical and medical cases.

Base Hospital No. 81 ceased to function March 31, 1919; the unit sailed from St. Nazaire June 3, 1919, on the Amphion; arrived at Newport News, Va., June 16, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, June 24, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. F. E. Bunts, M. C., July 2, 1918, to July 11, 1918.
Lieut. Col. J. E. Daugherty, M. C., July 12, 1918, to July 26, 1918. Lieut. Col. P. J. H. Farrell, M. C., July 27, 1918, to June 24, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. M. A. Hanna, M. C.
Maj. H. M. Hosmer, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Edmund Moss, M. C.
Maj. Howell E. Babcock, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 82z

Base Hospital No. 82 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit remained in training at Fort Riley until July 17, when it was transferred to Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., where it arrived July 19. Training was continued at Camp Crane. On August 28, the organization entrained for the port of embarkation; reached Hoboken, N. J., the following day; boarded the Leviathan; sailed August 31; arrived at Brest, France, September 7; remained at Pontanezen

yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 81, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. P. J. H. Farrell, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 82, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


701

Barracks, Brest, until September 16; entrained for the hospital center, Allerey, Department of Saone et Loire, in the intermediate section, where it was to function as a part of that hospital center; arrived at Allerey September 19, and was assigned to a section of type A barracks, called 26-A, that was being operated by a subunit from Base Hospital No. 26. Two days after its arrival at Allerey, the unit was ordered to proceed to Toul, Department Meurthe et Moselle, in the advance section, for duty; left Allerey September 25 and arrived at its new station September 27.

Base Hospital No. 82 was the fifth base hospital to arrive at Toul, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. The organization was assigned to the Caserne Luxembourg, which had been occupied by the American Red Cross Hospital No. 114, and consisted of 10 one-story ward buildings and numerous buildings for administration, storage, etc. Each ward building contained 7 wards, and from 3 to 7 small rooms. The normal capacity was 1,500 beds, with emergency expansion to 1,800 beds and cots.

The hospital began to receive patients September 29, two days after its arrival, and within a week was caring for 1,050 patients.

On January 29, 1919, the hospital plant at Caserne Luxembourg was abandoned and the unit took over the plant of Base Hospital No. 45, which had been ordered to the United States. Base Hospital No. 82 took over all patients and property of the latter at the Caserne La Marche, and functioned there until March 31. During its period of activity, the hospital received 7,725 surgical and medical cases.

On March 31, 1919, Base Hospital No. 87 relieved Base Hospital No. 82, which ceased operating on April 20, and the organization sailed from Brest May 28, 1919, on the President Grant; arrived in Boston, Mass., June 9, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Devens, Mass., June 14, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. A. C. Burnham, M. C., April 29, 1918, to April 13, 1919.
Lieut. Col. C. S. Wilson, M. C., April 14, 1919, to June 14, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Bruce G. Phillips, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Charles S. Wilson, M. C.
Capt. A. B. Schwartz, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 83a

Base Hospital No. 83 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. In June, 1918, the unit was transferred to Camp Pike, Ark. On August 25, the unit was ordered to proceed to Camp Upton, N. Y., where it arrived on August 30; embarked

aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 83, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


702

the following day on the Baltic; left New York Harbor September 1, 1918; arrived at Liverpool, England, September 13; proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel on the night of September 15; reached Le Havre, France, the following day; remained at Le Havre three days awaiting orders, and then proceeded by rail to Revigny, Department of Meuse, in the advance section, where it united with Evacuation Hospital No. 15, September 22, 1918.

On October 2 the commanding officer of Base Hospital No. 83 and 5 of its medical officers, together with 20 enlisted men, were sent on detached service to Camp Du Raton, Brizeaux, Forrestiere, where a 200-bed influenza and pneumonia hospital was established as an annex to Evacuation Hospital No. 11. Officers and men were also sent on detached service to Evacuation Hospitals No. 6 and No. 7 at Souilly, to Evacuation Hospital No. 10 at Froidos, and to the American Red Cross Hospital No. 114 at Fleury.

All officers and men on detached service were returned to their proper station at Revigny on November 10, 1918, and on November 14 Base Hospital No. 83 assumed charge of the hospital at Revigny. The medical and surgical work was mostly that of an evacuation hospital in that a majority of the patients were evacuated as soon as they were in condition to travel.

The hospital functioned independently and was not a part of a hospital center. The normal capacity was 800 beds.

The hospital ceased to function on February 1, 1919, and the personnel entrained March 8 for port of embarkation at St. Nazaire; sailed April 19, on the Mercury, for Newport News, Va.; arrived in the United States April 30, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., May 3, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Arthur A. Small, M. C., April, 1918, to May 3, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Roderick S. Elliott, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Charles G. Beall, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 84b

Base Hospital No. 84 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit received preliminary training at Fort Riley, and on June 27, was transferred to Camp Bowie, Tex., where it was attached to the base hospital of that camp for further training. The organization remained at Camp Bowie until August 25, when it left for the port of embarkation; arrived at Camp Merritt, N. J., August 29; embarked on the Talthybius, August 31; sailed from New York on September 1; arrived at Liverpool, England, September 13; entrained

bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 84, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O.,Washington, D. C.-Ed.


703

for Southampton; arrived the same day; crossed the English Channel the following night; reached Le Havre, France, September 15. On September 16, the unit entrained for its final destination, Perigueux, Department Dordogne, base section No. 2, and arrived there September 18. It was the first hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center there. It occupied a type A unit, of 1,000-bed capacity, the buildings of which had nearly been completed on arrival of the organization.

The first convoy of patients arrived October 18, and up to February 5, 1919, a total of 2,311 patients had been received; of these, 891 were medical and 1,420 surgical cases, with 250 operations.

On February 5, 1919, Base Hospital No. 84 ceased operating; turned over its property and records to Base Hospital No. 95; sailed from Bordeaux May 11, 1919, on the Otsego; arrived in New York, May 26, 1919; was transferred to Camp Bowie, Tex.; and demobilized on July 12, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. A. E. McReynolds, M. C., April 16, 1918, to July 15, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Peter D. MacNaughton, M. C., July 16, 1918, to September 28, 1918. 
Maj. Harry A. Peyton, M. C., September 29, 1918, to October 2, 1918.
Lieut. Col. B. H. Olmstead, M. C., October 3, 1918, to February 2, 1919.
Lieut. Col. James A. Harvey, M. C., February 3, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Harry A. Peyton, M. C.
Capt. Robert D. Gist, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. William R. May, M. C.
Capt. Frank D. Gorham, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 85c

Base Hospital No. 85 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization was transferred to Fort Sill, Okla., June 24, and attached, for training, to the base hospital at that camp. On September 1 the unit left Fort Sill for Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived September 5; embarked on the Canada September 7; left, September 9, for Europe; docked at Glasgow, Scotland, September 22; proceeded by rail to Southampton, England; crossed the English Channel the same night; landed in Cherbourg, France, September 23; remained in the rest camp at Cherbourg for two days; entrained for Paris September 25; arrived September 26. In Paris the organization was assigned to the Clignancourt Barracks, where it functioned as a part of the Paris district. The hospital was located in large military barracks of the French Army. The wall-inclosed

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 85, A. E. F.," by Capt. Roe S. Dorsett, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


704

space is situated on the Boulevard Ney and is an integral part of the walls of the city of Paris. All of the personnel were lodged within the walls of this institution. The capacity of the hospital was 1,500 beds. The first patients arrived October 11, 1918; during its service in Paris the hospital cared for approximately 2,500 medical and surgical cases.

On January 5, 1919, Base Hospital No. 85 was transferred to Angers, Department of Marne et Loire, base section No. 1, where it took over patients and property of Base Hospital No. 27; the latter organization having been ordered to return to the United States.
 

FIG. 142.-Base Hospital No. 85, Paris

Base Hospital No. 85 functioned at Angers until June 12, 1919, and during that time admitted 7,840 surgical and medical cases.

The organization sailed from St. Nazaire July 9, 1919, on the Panaman, arriving in New York on July 19, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 25, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. Robert H. Stephenson, M. C., April 16, 1918, to August 8, 1918.
Maj. Stanton A. Friedberg, M. C., August 9, 1918, to August 16, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Charles O. H. Laughinghouse, M. C., August 17, 1918, to January 29, 1919.
Col. Royal Reynolds, M. C., January 30, 1919, to February 26, 1919.
Col. William R. Eastman, M. C., February 27, 1919, to June 10, 1919.


705

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Joshua C. Hubbard, M. C.
Maj. Charles C. Sturgeon, M. C.
Maj. John M. Firman, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Appleton H. Pierce, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 86d

Base Hospital No. 86 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large; the enlisted men were practically all drafted men from the State of Oklahoma. On June 27 the organization left Fort Riley, en route to Camp Logan, Houston, Tex., where it arrived the following day. At Camp Logan the unit was trained at the camp base hospital.

On August 26 the command entrained for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived August 30; embarked the following day on the Baltic; sailed for Europe, September 1; arrived at Liverpool, England, September 13; proceeded the same day by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel the following night; reached Le Havre, France, September 15. On September 17 the unit entrained for its final station, the hospital center at Mesves, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section, and arrived September 19.

Base Hospital No. 86 was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as part of the hospital center there. The hospital occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, and began to receive patients on September 27. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,000 beds in barracks, with crisis expansion in marquee tents to 2,400. During its activity, September 27, 1918, to March 28, 1919, the hospital cared for 1,823 surgical and 2,252 medical cases; a total of 4,956. The largest number of patients in hospital was on November 15, 1918, when 2,340 were undergoing treatment. Base Hospital No. 86 was also designated to receive all mental and tubercular cases for the entire hospital center.

The hospital ceased to function on March 28, 1919; the personnel sailed from St. Nazaire for New York May 16, 1919, on the Dakotan, arriving in the United States May 28, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., May 31, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Herman J. Schlageter, M. C., July 29, 1918, to April 8, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Oliver C. Hargreaves, M. C., April 9, 1919, to May 31, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. John H. Blackburn, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Oliver C. Hargreaves, M. C.
 

dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 86, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. H. J. Schlageter, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


706
  BASE HOSPITAL NO. 87e

Base Hospital No. 87 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On June 26, the organization was transferred to Camp MacArthur, Tex., where it was attached to the base hospital of that camp for instruction. On September 6, the unit left Camp MacArthur for Camp Mills, N. Y., and arrived there September 10. Upon completion of its overseas equipment, the organization sailed from New York on the Finland on September 15; arrived at Brest, France, September 28; remained at the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks for seven days, where the unit was equipped with gas masks and steel helmets; entrained, October 5, for its final station, the Justice hospital group, at Toul, Department of Meurthe et Moselle, in the advance section; arrived at Toul, October 8, and immediately began to function as a part of that hospital center. It was the sixth hospital unit to arrive at that station. It took over the patients, personnel, and property of the Justice Gas Hospital and Neurological Hospital No. 2.

The gas hospital was located in the Caserne La Marche annex, which consisted of a number of large stone and cement buildings, with a bed capacity of 1,000, and was designated Base Hospital No. 87-A.

Neurological Hospital No. 2, occupied a part of the Caserne Fabvier, with a bed capacity of 700, and was designated Base Hospital No. 87-B.

After the armistice began, section A was designated to receive all respiratory diseases and section B was used exclusively as a genitourinary hospital. In March, 1919, section B was abandoned and on April 1, 1919, the Base Hospital No. 87 took over patients and property of Base Hospital No. 82, in the Caserne La Marche.

During its active service, October 9, 1918, to April 26, 1919, the hospital admitted 7,431 patients; of these, 5,718 were medical, 630 surgical, and 1,083 gas cases.

Base Hospital No. 87 ceased to function on April 27, 1919, and the personnel returned to the United States, sailing from Brest, June 10, 1919, on the Agamemnon; arrived in the United States June 18, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Funston, Kans., June 23, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. R. D. Harden, M. C., July 27, 1918, to April 8, 1919.
Lieut. Col. O. H. Campbell, M. C., April 9, 1919, to June 23, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. B. F. Alden, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. O. H. Campbell, M. C.

eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 87, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


707

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 88f

Base Hospital No. 88 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On June 24, the organization was transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa, and was assigned to the base hospital of that camp for duty and instruction. On September 11, the unit left Camp Dodge, en route to Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived September 14; embarked, September 19, on the America; sailed, September 20, for Brest, France; arrived, September 29; disembarked, October 1, and encamped at Pontanezen Barracks, where it remained for six days assisting various organizations in caring for sick during the influenza epidemic.

On October 7, the organization entrained for its final destination, Langres, Department of Haute Marne, advance section, and arrived October 11. This hospital was the second hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, of 1,000-bed capacity, with an emergency expansion in marquee tents to 1,500. The first convoy of patients was received October 15; during its stay at Langres, the hospital cared for 4,691 surgical and medical cases.

On January 11, 1919, the hospital turned over its patients and equipment to Base Hospital No. 53; proceeded to the hospital center at Savenay, Department of Loire Inferieure, for duty; arrived January 16, took over patients and equipment of Base Hospital No. 69, which was a well organized and equipped 2,500-bed hospital, and immediately began to function as a part of  the Savenay hospital center. This hospital was designated as a special hospital for all genitourinary cases at that center. Up to March 31, 1919, the hospital cared for 4,898 patients.

Base Hospital No. 88 ceased to function July 7; the personnel sailed from St. Nazaire for New York July 13, 1919 on the Sierra; arrived in the United States July 23, and were demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, July 30, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. A. S. Begg, M. C., June 24, 1918, to July 30, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Warren A. Dennis, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Joseph L. Edward, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 89g

Base Hospital No. 89 was organized in April, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On June 21, the unit left Fort Riley for Camp Sheridan, Ala., where it arrived June 23. At Camp

fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 88, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of the hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 89, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


708

Sheridan the organization was attached to the base hospital of that camp for instructions. On September 1, the command entrained for Camp Merritt, N. J., arrived September 3 and remained for five days, completing its equipment. The unit embarked on the Nelens; sailed from New York on September 9; landed at Glasgow, Scotland, September 22; entrained the same day for Southampton, England; arrived the following day; crossed the English Channel the same night; reached Le Havre, France, September 23; proceeded by rail to its final destination, Mesves, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section; arrived September 26. It was the sixth hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center.

The unit occupied a section of type A wooden barracks, the construction of which had not yet been completed. The bed capacity of hospital was 1,000 in barracks, with crisis emergency expansion to 2,190 beds. This included tents and all available space in the recreation hall and personnel quarters.

The first patients were received on October 7, when 630 ambulatory patients were received, and on the following day an additional 800 cases were admitted; the largest number of patients treated at one time was 2,186, on November 13. Base Hospital No. 89 received both surgical and medical cases; up to January 25, 1919, a total of 3,843 had been admitted.

Base Hospital No. 89 ceased to function as a hospital on April 19, 1919; the personnel sailed from Brest for New York May 22, 1919, on the Louisville; arrived in United States May 31, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 12, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. Fred F. Schwartz, M. C., June 12, 1918, to July 28, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Ross H. Skillern, M. C., July 29, 1918, to December 13, 1918.
Maj. Thomas G. Nelan, M. C., December 14, 1918, to February, 1919.
Maj. J. S. Fielden, M. C., February, 1919, to July 12, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Thomas P. Lloyd, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Walter S. Lucas, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 90h

Base Hospital No. 90 was organized in June, 1918, at Fort Riley, Kans., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large, and trained at that station until October 27. From Fort Riley the organization proceeded to Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived October 30; remained completing its equipment until November 10, when it embarked and sailed on the Mauretania; reached Liverpool, England, November 17; entrained the same day for the rest camp at Winchester; arrived the following day; crossed the English Channel and landed

hThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 90, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


709

at Le Havre, France, November 19; remained awaiting orders for 10 days; proceeded by rail to its station, Commercy, Department Meuse, advance section, on November 29; arrived there December 1. It was the second hospital unit to reach that station, where it formed a part of a two-unit hospital center. The organization took over the Caserne Lerouville, and proceeded to convert its buildings into a hospital. During its stay at Commercy it did not function as a hospital, but a number of its officers and men assisted Base Hospital No. 91, which was operating a hospital at that station, in caring for its patients. On January 7, 1919, the unit was transferred to Chaumont, Department of Haute Marne, in the advance section, where it took over the patients and equipment of Base Hospital No. 15. Base Hospital No. 90 ceased to function on June 8, 1919, and the personnel returned to the United States; sailed June 26, 1919 on the Mongolia; arrived in New York July 6, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Custer, Mich., July 12, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. W. P. Morrill, M. C., August 9, 1918, to January 5, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Harry T. Summergill, M. C., January 6, 1919, to February 28, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Harry G. Ford, M. C., March 1, 1919, to June 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. H. F. Connally, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. James D. Pilcher, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 91i

Base Hospital No. 91 was organized June 16, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The command received preliminary training at Camp Greenleaf, and on August 15 was transferred to Camp Gordon, Ga., where it was attached to the camp base hospital for further instructions.

The organization remained in training at Camp Gordon until October 31, when it entrained for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y.; arrived November 2; remained and completed its equipment, until November 9. On November 10 the unit boarded the Mauretania; left New York Harbor the same day; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 17; proceeded by rail to the rest camp at Winchester; left on November 19 for Southampton; crossed the English Channel the same day; disembarked at Le Havre, France, November 20; remained encamped at Le Havre until November 27; proceeded by rail to its final station, Commercy, Department of Meuse, in the advance section; arrived November 30. This was the first hospital unit to be permanently assigned to that station, which was to become a small hospital center. Upon arrival at Commercy the

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 91, A. E. F.," by Capt. F. L. Burch, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


710

unit took over the hospital in the Caserne Oudinot, which was being operated by Evacuation Hospital No. 13. The hospital plant consisted of several stone buildings, which were found in a good condition and contained 450 patients. The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,000 with an emergency expansion to 1,500; the largest number of patients in hospital was on January 24, 1919, when 1,458 were under treatment.

Base Hospital No. 91 ceased to function July 1, 1919, and the personnel sailed July 22, 1919, for the United States from Brest on the Pocahontas; arrived August 1, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., August 5, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Harry T. Summergill, M. C., July 8, 1918, to January 6, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Warren P. Morrill, M. C., January 7, 1919, to February 13, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Thomas J. Leary, M. C., February 14, 1919, to June 15, 1919.
Lieut. Col. George C. Dunham, M. C., June 16, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. James G. Flynn, M. C.
Maj. Harry Gross, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Harry Gross, M. C.
Capt. Hugh P. Boswell, M. C.
Maj. S. B. Newton, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 92j

Base Hospital No. 92 was organized June 17, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The command received its preliminary training at that camp, and on August 18 was transferred to Camp Greene, N. C., for further instruction. The unit remained at Camp Greene until October 27; entrained for Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived there the following day; proceeded to New York on November 10; boarded the Mauretania and left New York for Europe the same day; disembarked at Liverpool, England, November 17; entrained for the rest camp at Winchester; arrived the following day; proceeded to Southampton November 19; crossed the English Channel and landed at Le Havre, France, November 20.

After a rest of three days the organization proceeded to Pontanezen Barracks, near Brest, where it remained in the rest camp for one week. Base Hospital No. 92, while with the American Expeditionary Forces, did not work as a unit, but as groups between Pontanezen and Kerhuon, at Camp Hospital No. 33, and with Base Hospitals Nos. 65 and 105.

jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 92, A. E. F.," by First Lieut. Albert A. Shapiro, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


711

The unit was skeletonized February 10, 1919; a small detachment sailed from Brest March 23, 1919, on the Aquitania; arrived in the United States March 30, and was demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., shortly afterward.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. J. C. Friedman, M. C., August 30, 1918, to September 30, 1918.
Maj. J. A. Livingston, M. C., October 1, 1918, to December 17, 1918.
Maj. J. C. Friedman, M. C., December 18, 1918, to February 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Josiah M. Slemane, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. J. C. Friedman, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 93k

Base Hospital No. 93 was organized July 15, 1918, at Camp Lewis, Wash., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large, and remained in training until the last week of September, 1918, when the organization was ordered to proceed to San Francisco, Calif., where it arrived October 10. Orders for its embarkation at San Francisco were changed to embarkation at an eastern port, and the unit proceeded by rail to Camp Mills, N. Y., where it arrived October 16. At Camp Mills the organization was broken up into several groups and assigned to various transports for transportation overseas. The organization left New York Harbor in the convoy, October 19, and arrived at Liverpool, England, October 31. Here the command was reassembled and then proceeded by rail to Southampton; arrived the following morning; crossed the English Channel the night of November 3; landed at Le Havre, France, November 4; entrained the following day for its station at Le Mont Dore, Department Puy de Dome, intermediate section; arrived November 6.

Base Hospital No. 93 was the only hospital at that station, but functioned as a part of the Clermont-Ferrand hospital center. The unit occupied the hotel Sarciron, which was the largest and most modern hotel in the city, and reported ready for patients two days after its arrival; the first patients were received November 11, 1918. The bed capacity of the hospital was 717; total number of patients admitted was 970. The unit functioned at Le Mont Dore for little over a month; was transferred, December 18, to Cannes, Alpes Maritimes, base section No. 6, for duty; arrived at its new station December 22, and immediately began to function as a part of the Riviera hospital center.

At Cannes the unit took over four large hotels and converted them into hospitals; these hotels were admirably suited to hospital purposes, and had a bed capacity of 1,450. Each hotel was in charge of an officer, who was

kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 93, A. E. F.," by Capt. Arthur C. Johnson, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


712

responsible to the commanding officer for its proper administration. The first convoy of patients arrived January 19, 1919, and up to April 1, 1919, 3,669 surgical and medical cases were admitted.

Base Hospital No. 93 ceased to function on May 10, 1919; the personnel returned to the United States on the Patria; sailed from Marseille June 7, 1919; arrived at Camp Merritt, N. J., June 22, and were demobilized shortly afterward.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. J. D. Whitham, M. C., August 26, 1918, to May 3, 1919.
Maj. James Hamilton, jr., M. C., May 4, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Joseph K. Swindt, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. William G. Cassels, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 94l

Base Hospital No. 94 was organized July 23, 1918, at Camp Cody, N. Mex., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large, and was equipped and received training at that camp until October 8, when the command entrained for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y., where it arrived October 13. During this trip, a large part of the personnel was taken sick with influenza, necessitating leaving 35 men behind when the unit left for overseas. On October 19, the organization embarked on the Walmer Castle sailed from New York Harbor the same day; arrived at Liverpool, England, October 31; entrained for Southampton the same day; arrived November 1; crossed the English Channel the following night; landed at Le Havre, France, November 3; remained in the Le Havre rest camp until November 5; proceeded by rail to its final destination, Pruniers, Department Loire et Cher, in the intermediate section; arrived at Pruniers, November 7.

Base Hospital No. 94 occupied a section of wooden barracks, of 1,000-bed capacity. The hospital was not a part of any hospital center, but functioned independently. The first patients were admitted November 14, one week after its arrival. During November, 539 medical and surgical cases were received.

In February, 1919, a majority of the personnel was transferred to various organizations for duty, and on February 10, 1919, Camp Hospital No. 43 took over the patients and equipment of Base Hospital No. 94. The skeletonized unit, 1 officer and 5 enlisted men, proceeded to St. Nazaire; sailed from that port March 25, on the Orizaba; arrived at Camp Merritt, N. J., April 2, 1919, and was demobilized at Bowie, Tex., April 28, 1919.

lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 94, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Henry R. Brown, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


713

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Henry R. Brown, M. C., July 23, 1918, to February 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Leonard S. Willour, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Brewster C. Doust, M. C.

FIG. 143.-Part of Base Hospital No. 94, Pruniers

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 95m

Base Hospital No. 95 was organized August 17, 1918, at Camp Fremont, Calif., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization was attached to the base hospital at that camp for temporary duty and there received its training. The command left Camp Fremont for Camp Upton November 4; arrived November 10; remained for four days completing its overseas equipment; proceeded to New York on November 15; boarded the La France and sailed the same day for Brest, France; arrived November 22.

mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 95, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


714

After several days of rest at the Pontanezen Barracks, the organization proceeded by rail to its final destination, Perigueux, Department of Dordogne, base section No. 2, and arrived December 3. This was the second hospital unit to reach that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It occupied a section of type A barracks, with a bed capacity of 1,000. The first convoy of patients arrived on December 15, 1918. During January, 1919, this hospital was designated as one of the orthopedic hospitals of the American Expeditionary Forces, and a great many orthopedic cases were received from the medical formations in the advance section.

Base Hospital No. 95 ceased to function May 16, 1919, and the personnel left for Bordeaux on May 31, for embarkation to the United States. Embarked on the Ohioan; sailed for New York June 9, 1919; arrived in the United States on June 21, 1919; were demobilized at Fort D. A. Russell, Wyo., July 1, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Edward A. Coates, M. C., August 19, 1918, to February 2, 1919.
Lieut. Col. B. H. Olmstead, M. C., February 3, 1919, to July 1, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Benjamin F. Cunningham, M. C.
Maj. Harry J. Craycroft, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Roy A. Brown, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 96n

Base Hospital No. 96 was organized in September, 1918, at Camp Kearny, Calif., and received its training at that camp. The unit left Camp Kearny on October 15 en route to Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived October 20; remained there completing its overseas equipment until October 27. During this time, influenza broke out among its members, and when the unit sailed it left 65 of its men behind. On October 27, the organization left New York harbor on the Orca; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 8; proceeded by rail to Southampton, and crossed the English Channel on the following day; landed at Le Havre, France, November 11; remained at the Le Havre rest camp until November 28; entrained for its final destination, the hospital center at Beaune, Depart-Cote d'Or, in the advance section; arrived November 30. It was the fifth hospital unit to arrive at that center. It was assigned a section of type A wooden barracks, of 1,000-bed capacity. The unit never functioned as a hospital in the American Expeditionary Forces, and the majority of its personnel was transferred to other hospitals for duty.

The skeletonized unit sailed from St. Nazaire for Newport News, Va., April 20, 1919, on the Finland; arrived in United States May 1, 1919, and was demobilized at the Presidio of San Francisco, Calif., May 26, 1919

nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 96, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


715

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Robert Smart, M. C., September, 1918, to February 19, 1919.
Capt. Leon Jacobs, M. C., February 20, 1919, to May 26, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. Ralph Hagan, M. C.

CHIEF OF THE MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Leon Jacobs, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 97o

Base Hospital No. 97 was organized June 25, 1918, at Camp Newton D. Baker, El Paso, Tex., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. August 14, the unit was moved to Camp Fort Bliss, El Paso, Tex., where it received its training. A majority of the personnel was assigned to the base hospital at Fort Bliss for temporary duty. On October 20, the command left Fort Bliss, en route to Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y.; arrived October 25; boarded the Balmoral Castle at New York; sailed October 27 for Liverpool, England; landed November 8; entrained the following day for Southampton; crossed the English Channel from that port on November 10; reached Le Havre, France, November 11; remained at the Le Havre rest camp until November 28; entrained for Allerey, Department of Saone et Loire, intermediate section; arrived November 30. It was the seventh hospital unit to reach Allerey, where for a short time it functioned as a part of that hospital center. The organization was assigned to a section of type A barracks, which had been operated by a subunit from Base Hospital No. 70, and contained 748 convalescent patients on December 10, when the transfer was made.

Base Hospital No. 97 functioned as a hospital from December 10 to 28, on which date the commanding officer of the hospital center ordered it to be converted into an evacuation unit, and from that time on the unit handled only class A men. On February 28, 1919, the unit ceased to function and the majority of the personnel was assigned to various organizations for duty.

The skeletonized Base Hospital No. 97 returned to the United States on the Graf Waldersee, sailing from Brest on April 7, 1919; arrived at Hoboken, N. J., April 20, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., April 22, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. J. E. Dougherty, M. C., June 25, 1918, to April 22, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Charles D. Bodine, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Thad Shaw, M. C.

oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 97, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


716

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 98p

Base Hospital No. 98 was organized in July, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 6, the command was transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga., where it received its training and was attached to the base hospital of that camp for instruction. The organization left Camp Hancock for Camp Merritt, N. J., October 3, and remained there on temporary duty, assisting at the base hospital during the influenza epidemic. On November 10, it left Camp Merritt, N. J., for New York; boarded the Empress of Russia; sailed on November 12 for Brest, France; arrived November 22; proceeded to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks, where it remained until November 29; entrained for Paris; arrived the following day. In Paris, the unit was assigned to duty at the convalescent camp, which had been established on the race track at Tremblay, Nogent sur Marne. On December 20, the hospital was ordered to proceed to Lourdes, Department of Haute Pyrenees, in base section No. 2; arrived December 22, and was assigned a number of hotels in which the unit was to operate a hospital. On January 1, 1919, the project of establishing a hospital at Lourdes was abandoned and Base Hospital No. 98 was ordered to Limoges for duty; entrained on January 22; arrived at Limoges, Department Haute Vienne, base section No. 2, January 23. At Limoges it relieved Base Hospital No. 28 and took over its patients and equipment and assumed full charge on February 1, 1919. In March, 1919, the entire hospital plant was abandoned and all patients and personnel were moved to the Bellaire Seminary, which prior to that had been used as an annex to the hospital. The capacity of the hospital was reduced to 200 beds, and the hospital served only the troops stationed in Limoges.

Base Hospital No. 98 ceased to function on May 23, 1919; the personnel sailed from Bordeaux for New York, June 9, 1919, on the Ohioan; arrived in the United States June 21, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., June 23, 1919.
 

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Walter Bensel, August 24, 1918, to December 27, 1918.
Maj. Charles H. Weber, December 28, 1918, to June 23, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Henry M. Chapman.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. James W. Barrow.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 99q

Base Hospital No. 99 was organized August 22, 1918, at Camp Custer, Mich., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large, and received its training at the camp base hospital. After two months of training, the command

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 98, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 99, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


717

proceeded by rail to Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived October 22; sailed from New York harbor October 27, on the Minnekahda; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 8; entrained the same day for Southampton; arrived the following day; crossed the English Channel during the night of November 10; landed at Le Havre, November 11; remained at the Le Havre rest camp until November 22; left for its station at Hyeres, Department of Var, base section No. 6; arrived November 26. It was the first hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it took over United States Convalescent Hospital No. 1, and became a part of the Riviera hospital center. The hospital functioned as a convalescent hospital. The plant consisted of 10 buildings, situated from one-half mile to 5 miles apart; prior to their being taken over by the United States Army the various buildings had been hotels. Hyeres is one of the popular resorts on the Riviera and is an ideal place for a convalescent hospital. The hospital had a bed capacity of 3,638; during its period of activity, November 26, 1918, to May 1, 1919, it handled over 8,000 medical and 2,147 surgical cases.

Base Hospital No. 99 ceased to function May 10, 1919, and the unit left Hyeres for Marseille, May 20, 1919; sailed May 31, 1919, on the Duca D'Abruzzi for New York; arrived, June 18, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Custer, Mich., June 27, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Maynard L. Simmons, M. C., August 22, 1918, to March 26, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Leopold Mitchell, M. C., March 27, 1919, to May 1, 1919.
Lieut. Col. George C. Dunham, M. C., May 2, 1919, to May 15, 1919.
Maj. Frederick C. Warnshuis, M. C., May 16, 1919, to June 27, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Frederick C. Warnshuis, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Nelson W. Janney, M. C.
Maj. Joseph Catton, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 100r

Base Hospital No. 100 was organized, July 12, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 21, the command was transferred to Camp Custer, Mich., where it was assigned to the camp base hospital for training. On October 30, 1918, the organization entrained at Camp Custer for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived November 1; remained until November 10; proceeded to the port of embarkation; sailed on the Mauretania on the same day; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 17; entrained for Winchester; arrived the following day; left the Winchester rest camp for Southampton November 19; crossed the English Channel;

rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 100, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


718

landed at Le Havre, France, November 20; entrained on November 21 for its final station at Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1; arrived on November 23.

Base Hospital No. 100 was the fifth hospital unit to reach Savenay, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It was assigned to a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, already under operation as an auxiliary to Base Hospital No. 8, but not fully completed. This hospital consisted of 19 buildings of frame construction and 5 of cement. After its arrival, six frame barracks were erected, to be used for the hospital personnel. It was used largely as a receiving and evacuating hospital for walking cases. On the date of its arrival, the hospital was filled with 1,109 patients. During its period of activity, November 23, 1918, to June 21, 1919, the hospital handled 11,081 patients.

The hospital ceased to function, June 21, 1919, and the personnel sailed from St. Nazaire July 5, 1919 on the South Bend; arrived in the United States July 15, and were demobilized at Camp Sherman, Ohio, July 20, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Frederick H. Newberry, M. C., August 16, 1918, to April 10, 1919.
Maj. Mortimer Warren, M. C., April 11, 1919, to July 20, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Hammer C. Irwin, M. C.
Maj. Lawrence H. Hoffman, M. C.
Maj. Josiah R. McKirahan, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Mortimer Warren, M. C.
Maj. John A. Dodd, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 101s

Base Hospital No. 101 came into existence about July 5, 1917, at St. Nazaire, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1, the personnel being taken from the Medical Department of the 1st Division, and Base Hospital No. 18. All members of Base Hospital No. 18 were replaced in August, 1917, by officers and men from Base Hospital No. 8, who in turn were relieved in October, 1917, by a casual medical detachment of the Regular Army.

Base Hospital No. 101 was the first base hospital to operate with the American Expeditionary Forces, and when organized was United States Army Hospital No. 1, which subsequently was changed to Base Hospital No. 101. The hospital was located in the Municipal College of St. Nazaire, and had been used as a military hospital by the French Army during the three years preceding. When taken over by us the hospital contained about 290 sick American soldiers and civilian employees.

sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 101, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


719

During its first year of service practically all the patients admitted were from incoming transports; on October 6 and 7, 1918, over 900 cases of influenza and severe cases of pneumonia were received from the Princess Matoika, the Mongolia, and the President Grant. The number of deaths was quite appalling and occurred directly after admission to the hospital. At this time the capacity of the hospital was very much overtaxed and cots and bed sacks were placed in every available shelter to
accommodate incoming patients.

The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,020 beds, with an emergency expansion to 1,500. During its period of activity it cared for about 20,000 surgical and medical cases.

Besides being the first base hospital to function with United States troops in France, Base Hospital No. 101 was one of the last hospitals to cease operations. It closed its doors on June 20, 1919, and the personnel sailed from Marseille June 28, 1919, on the Marica. Upon arrival in New York, July 9, 1919, the organization was split up and sent to various camps for demobilization.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. George P. Peed, M. C., July 5, 1917, to July 14, 1917.
Maj. Wayne H. Crum, M. C., July 15, 1917, to January 14, 1918.
Col. Albert S. Bowen, M. C., January 15, 1918, to September 22, 1918.
Lieut. Col. William B. Meister, M. C., September 23, 1918, to June 5, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Harvey Stone, M. C.
Maj. James A. Duff, M. C.
Maj. E. L. Gilchrist, M. C.
Maj. Thomas Mullen, M. C.
Maj. P. Nesbitt, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Henry C. Thacher, M. C.
Maj. Milton B. Katzenstin, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 102t

Base Hospital No. 102 was organized in February, 1918, at San Juan, P. R., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit was transferred to Camp Beauregard, La., where it completed its training. In July, 1918, the organization proceeded to Fort McHenry, Md., where it arrived on July 24, and was attached to General Hospital No. 2 for temporary duty. On August 4, the unit proceeded to Baltimore, Md.; embarked the same day on the Umbria; sailed for Genoa, Italy; arrived at Genoa, August 27; remained, awaiting orders, until September 6; proceeded to its station at Vicenza, Italy; arrived there the following day.

tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 102, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


720

This unit was sent to Italy for service with the Italian Army. Previous to the signing of the armistice this hospital was not open to medical cases, particularly cases of chronic nature, such as venereal diseases. The entire hospital and personnel were held in reserve for casualties evacuated from the front. However, in September, arrangements were made whereby medical and other cases of the American Forces were accepted regardless of their nature. Later the hospital acquired an additional building accommodating about 400 beds, and converted it into a hospital for medical cases; the original hospital now was used entirely for surgical cases.

During the period this hospital was in operation 397 Americans were admitted and treated. This small number represented only a very small per cent of the total cases admitted, the great majority coming from the Italian forces at the front and elsewhere. This was the only base hospital on duty with the Italian forces and was in active operation from September 29, 1918, to March 31, 1919.

On March 31, Base Hospital No. 102 ceased to function and proceeded to Genoa for embarkation to the United States and sailed from that port April 7, 1919, on the Duca D'Abruzzi. Upon arrival in the United States, April 23, 1919, the organization was sent to Camp Shelby, Miss., where it was demobilized shortly afterwards.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Edgar E. Hume, M. C., July 6, 1918, to February 21, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Joseph A. Danna, February 22, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Joseph A. Danna, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. William L. Dunn, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 103u

Base Hospital No. 103 was organized in May, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 21 the command was transferred to Fort Sheridan, Ill., where it arrived August 22, and completed its training. It entrained October 15 for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived October 17; remained until October 25; embarked from New York on the Leviathan October 25; sailed October 27. The Leviathan arrived in Liverpool November 3; from there the unit proceeded by rail to Winchester; arrived at Winchester November 4; remained in the rest camp until the following day; proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel the same night and landed at Le Havre, France, November 6; entrained the following day for its final destination, the hospital center at Clermont-

uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 103, A. E. F.," by Capt. Henry E. Melany, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


721

Ferrand, Department Puy de Dome, in base section No. 2; arrived November 9. Base Hospital No. 103 was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at that station and became a part of the hospital center. The unit was assigned a convent school and French artillery barracks, with a total bed capacity of 2,600. Shortly after the arrival of the organization the hospitalization project at Clermont-Ferrand was abandoned and the unit, without having functioned as a hospital, was ordered to Dijon for duty.

Base Hospital No. 103 left its station on January 1, 1919, and arrived at Dijon, Department Cote d' Or, in the advance section, January 2. At Dijon the organization relieved Base Hospital No. 17, and transfer of patients and equipment was completed on January 9. The hospital contained 1,139 patients when taken over; and as Base Hospital No. 103 was short of personnel some of the members of Base Hospital No. 17 remained on duty with the new command.

FIG. 144.-Main building, Base Hospital No. 103, Dijon.

On February 5 four cases of smallpox broke out in the command and the entire hospital was placed in quarantine. During this time no patients were being evacuated, and at the end of the quarantine, February 20, the hospital contained 1,786 patients, the largest number ever treated at one time. During its period of activity the hospital cared for 7,563 surgical and medical cases, with 306 operations.

Base Hospital No. 103 ceased to function June 12, 1919; the personnel sailed from Brest July 1, 1919, on the Great Northern; arrived at New York July 6, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Funston, Kans., July 15, 1919.


722

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. John N. Teeter, M. C., August 23, 1918, to October 24, 1918.
Lieut. Col. John C. Morfit, M. C., October 25, 1918, to January 20, 1919.
Lieut. Col. H. H. Van Kirk, M. C., January 21, 1919, to July 15, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. John R. Vaughan, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. John N. Teeter, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 104v

Base Hospital No. 104 was organized July 12, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 12 the unit was transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa, for training.

On October 31 the command entrained for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y., where it arrived November 2. It remained, completing overseas equipment, until November 10; embarked on the Mauretania; sailed the same day for Europe; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 17; proceeded by rail to the rest camp at Winchester; remained until November 19; proceeded to Southampton; crossed the English Channel November 20; landed at Le Havre, France, November 21; entrained the same day for its final destination, the hospital center at Beau Desert, Department Gironde, base section No. 2, where it arrived November 24.

Base Hospital No. 104 was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at Beau Desert, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. The unit was assigned for temporary duty with Base Hospital No. 22, until December 18, when it took charge of a section of type A wooden barracks, and began to function as a hospital. The normal capacity was 1,000 beds, with emergency expansion to 1,660. During its period of activity, December 18, 1918, to May 31, 1919, the unit cared for 7,127 surgical and medical cases.

Base Hospital No. 104 operated as a receiving hospital for the center, the class of patients handled being noncontagious and nonvenereal, the majority being convalescents. Practically all officer patients admitted to the center were handled through this hospital.

Base Hospital No. 104 ceased to function May 31, 1919, and the personnel sailed for the United States from Bordeaux June 10 on the Iowan; arrived in New York June 22; were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., on June 25, 1919.

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 104, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. James S. Hammers, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


723

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Charles A. E. Codman, M. C., August 23, 1918, to November 2, 1918.
Lieut. Col. James S. Hammers, M. C., November 3, 1918, to May 31, 1919.
Capt. John A. Green, M. C., June 1, 1919, to June 25, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Frank R. Sheppard, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Charles A. E. Codman, M. C.
Capt. John A. Green, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 105w

Base Hospital No. 105 was organized July 22, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 29 the unit was transferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., where it arrived August 31, and completed its training and equipment. The command left Fort Benjamin Harrison, October 23, en route to Camp Merritt, N. J., and arrived two days later. On October 27 it proceeded to Hoboken, N. J., where it was split up and placed on board four ships for transportation to Europe. All four groups left New York Harbor at the same time, October 28.

The convoy reached Brest, France, November 9; the unit was reassembled and sent to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks, where it remained until November 12, when it was transferred to the Hospital Center, Kerhuon, in base section No. 5. There the unit took charge of a section of type A barracks of 1,240-bed capacity, and began to function as an annex to Base Hospital No. 65. The nature of the work at this hospital was that of an embarkation hospital.

On February 6, 1919, the unit was skeletonized, the personnel being transferred to various organizations for duty. The skeletonized unit, consisting of 1 officer and 5 enlisted men, sailed from Brest for New York, March 16, 1919, on the Felix Taussig; arrived in the United States April 1, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., April 1, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. Edward W. Pinkham, M. C., August 31, 1918, to February 9, 1919.
First Lieut. Vernard R. Hodges, M. C., February 10, 1919, to April 1, 1919.

wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 105, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Edward W. Pinkham, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


724

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Harry M. Lee, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Charles W. Knapp, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 106x

Base Hospital No. 106 was organized in August, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The command was transferred, on August 31, to Camp Jackson, S. C., where it was attached to the camp base hospital for temporary duty. On October 15, the organization left Camp Jackson, S. C., for Camp Merritt, N. J., where it arrived October 17, and remained there for 10 days, completing its overseas equipment. On October 25, the unit embarked on the Leviathan at Hoboken, N. J.; sailed for Europe October 27; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 3; proceeded by rail to Southampton by way of Winchester; crossed the English Channel to Le Havre, France; arrived November 6.

FIG. 145.-Main kitchen, Base Hospital No. 106, Beau Desert hospital center

From Le Havre the unit proceeded by rail to its final station, the hospital center at Beau Desert, Department Gironde, in base section No. 2; arrived November 10. Base Hospital No. 106 was the third hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It was assigned to a section of type A wooden barracks which were about 90 per cent complete, and had a capacity of 1,000 beds.

xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 106, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Louis I. Mason, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


725

This hospital was designated as a receiving hospital for all venereal, contagious, and infectious diseases, tuberculosis and surgical chest cases for the entire center. The first patients were admitted December 4, 1918; during its period of activity, the organization cared for 4,297 medical and surgical cases; of these 735 were venereal and 865 were tuberculosus patients.

Base Hospital No. 106 ceased to function May 31, 1919, and its personnel returned to the United States on the Iowan; sailed from Bordeaux June 10, 1919; arrived in New York June 22, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 12, 1919.

FIG. 146.-Interior, detachment mess, Base Hospital No. 106

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Louis I. Mason, M. C., September 17, 1918, to July 12, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. George W. Newell, M. C.
Maj. Walter A. Kennedy, M. C.
Capt. Daniel W. Prentiss, M. C.
Maj. Ralph Balch, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Robert B. Scales, M. C.


726

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 107y

Base Hospital No. 107 was organized in July, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 27, the command was transferred to Fort Snelling, Minn., where it received further training at General Hospital No. 29. On October 25 the unit entrained at Fort Snelling for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y., where it arrived October 28. Two days later the unit proceeded to Hoboken, N. J.; embarked on the Great Northern; sailed the following day, October 31, for Europe; arrived at Brest, France, November 9; disembarked on the following day; remained at the Pontanezen rest camp until November 14; proceeded by rail to its final destination, the hospital center at Mars-sur-Alliers, Department Nievre, in the intermediate section.

Base Hospital No. 107 arrived at Mars November 17, and was the seventh hospital unit to reach that station, where it immediately began to function as a part of the hospital center. On November 18 the unit took over a section of type A barracks that had been operated as an annex to Base Hospital No. 35, and contained 1,139 patients. The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,170. During its activity, November 18, 1918, to April 20, 1919, it cared for 1,267 surgical and 1,722 medical cases; the majority of whom were convalescent. This unit never had any Army nurses regularly assigned to it; but whenever needed, casual nurses were sent there for temporary duty.

Base Hospital No. 107 ceased to function April 20, 1919; the personnel sailed for New York from St. Nazaire June 23, 1919, on the Arizonan; arrived in the United States July 6, and were demobilized at Camp Pike, Ark., July 15, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. J. M. W. Scott, M. C., August 24, 1918, to November 21, 1918.
Maj. Scurry L. Terrell, M. C., November 22, 1918, to December 4, 1918.
Lieut. Col. J. M. W. Scott, M. C., December 5, 1918, to March 1, 1919.
Maj. N. M. Jones, M. C., March 2, 1919, to May 7, 1919.
Capt. Llewelyn R. Johnson, M. C., May 8, 1919, to July 15, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. N. M. Jones, M. C.
Capt. Foster K. Collins, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. H. Caro, M. C.
Capt. J. F. Lynn, M. C.

yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 107, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


727

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 108z

Base Hospital No. 108 was organized August 15, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On September 12 the command was transferred to Fort Snelling, Minn., where it was attached to General Hospital No. 29, for further instruction. The unit remained at Fort Snelling until October 25; entrained for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y.; arrived October 28; completed overseas equipment; October 30 proceeded to Hoboken, N. J.; embarked on the George Washington; sailed the following day, October 31, for Europe.

The unit arrived at Brest, France, November 9; disembarked and marched to Pontanezen Barracks; encamped and remained until November 17; proceeded by rail to its permanent station, the hospital center at Mesves, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section. Base Hospital No. 108 arrived at Mesves November 20 and began to function as a part of the hospital center. It occupied a section of type A barracks, the construction of which was very much incomplete when taken over. The first patients were received on November 29, 500 being admitted on that date, largely convalescent surgical and medical cases. The normal bed capacity of the hospital was 1,000; during its period of active service, November 29, 1918, to May 16, 1919, 1,290 surgical and 920 medical cases were admitted.

Base Hospital No. 108 ceased to function May 16, 1919, and its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire for New York June 23, 1919, on the Arizonan; arrived in the United States July 6, and were demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, July 10, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Albert Vander Veer, M. C., September 14, 1918, to November 21, 1918.
Maj. Charles T. Sturgeon, M. C., November 22, 1918, to November 25, 1918.
Col. E. H. Bruns, M. C., November 26, 1918, to December 20, 1918.
Lieut. Col. William A. Jolley, M. C., December 21, 1918, to July 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Charles T. Sturgeon, M. C.
Maj. Harold A. Fiske, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Joseph H. Saunders, M. C.
Maj. Albert Vander Veer, M. C.

zThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 108, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


728

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 109a

Base Hospital No. 109 was organized August 24, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The command was transferred on September 15, 1918, to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., where it received further training. On October 18, the organization left for Camp Merritt, N. J.; arrived October 20; remained for five days, completing its overseas equipment; embarked, October 25, on the Cretic; left New York, October 26, for Europe; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 8; entrained the following day for Southampton; arrived November 9; crossed the English Channel on the night of November 10; landed at Le Havre, France, November 11. From Le Havre, the unit proceeded to its final station, the hospital center at Vichy, Department Alliers, intermediate section; arrived November 24, 1918.

On December 3, 1918, Base Hospital No. 109 took over four hotels, with 470 patients, from other hospitals in the center, and later, it was assigned additional buildings, so that before it ceased to function it operated in 22 separate buildings. During its period of active service, December 3, 1918, to March 12, 1919, the hospital cared for 4,700 surgical and medical cases.

The unit ceased to function as a hospital on March 12, 1919, and left Vichy, April 7, en route to Brest, where it arrived, April 10. On April 25, the organization embarked on the Cap Finistere, sailing the same day for Hoboken, N. J., arriving there May 5, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, May 16, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Francis Vinsonhaler, M. C., September 15, 1918, to May 16, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Prince E. Sawyer, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. William E. Howell, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 110b

Base Hospital No. 110 was organized in August, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On September 11, 1918, the command was transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., for further training. On November 1, 1918, the organization entrained for Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y., arrived November 3; remained, completing its overseas equipment, until November 10; embarked on the Empress of Asia, and two days later, November 12, sailed for Europe; arrived at Brest, France, November 22, 1918; encamped at Pontanezen Barracks, and remained there until December 2; proceeded to its final station, the hospital center at Mars-sur-Alliers, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section; arrived December 4.

aThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 109, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
bThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 110, A. E. F.," by Capt. Isaac Reitzfeld, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


729

Base Hospital No. 110 was the eighth hospital unit to reach Mars, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. The unit took over a section of type A wooden barracks and began to receive patients two days after its arrival.

This hospital received both medical and surgical cases, but in January, 1919, it was designated as a special hospital for neuropsychiatric cases. The normal capacity of the hospital was 1,000 beds; during its service as a hospital, December 6, 1918, to May 10, 1919, it cared for 2,885 patients, including several hundred neuropsychiatric cases.

Base Hospital No. 110 ceased to function May 10, 1919, and its personnel returned to the United States; sailed from St. Nazaire June 23, 1919, on the Arizonan; arrived in the United States July 6, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 10, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. William C. Le Compts, M. C., August 23, 1918, to April 30, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Thew Wright, M. C., May 1, 1919, to July 10, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Thew Wright was chief of both the surgical and medical services.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 111c

Base Hospital No. 111 was organized August 10, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large; the enlisted personnel were composed of drafted men from Oklahoma, Mississippi, and New York. The unit remained in training at Camp Greenleaf until September 10, 1918, when it was transferred to Camp Beauregard, La., where training was continued until October 29, 1918. The unit proceeded to Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y.; arrived November 2, 1918; embarked November 10, 1918, on the Empress of Asia, left New York, November 12; arrived at Brest, France, November 22, 1918; proceeded to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks; remained there until November 25; entrained for its permanent station, the hospital center at Beau Desert, Department Gironde, base section No. 2.

Upon arrival at Beau Desert, the organization took over a type A 1,000-bed hospital and began to receive patients on December 8, 1918. On May 1, 1919, Evacuation Hospital No. 20 was relieved from duty at Beau Desert, and Base Hospital No. 111 took over its plant and equipment and functioned as an evacuation hospital for all cases en route to the United States. The medical service, in addition to its other duties, held daily sick call for 1,300 prisoners of war and three escort companies, stationed at Beau Desert. In addition to the patients handled while functioning as an evacuation hospital, the organization cared for approximately 7,000 surgical and medical cases.

Base Hospital No. 111 ceased operating on May 31, 1919, and the personnel returned to the United States; sailed from Bordeaux June 10, 1919, on the Iowan; arrived at Philadelphia, June 22, 1919; proceeded by rail to Camp Dix, N. J., where they were demobilized shortly afterward.

cThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 111, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. James B. Woodman, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


730

PERSONNEL


COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. George F. Glass, M. C., September 12, 1918, to September 30, 1919.
Lieut. Col. James B. Woodman, M. C., October 1, 1918, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. B. A. Bopp, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. George F. Glass, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 112d

Base Hospital No. 112 was organized in August, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The command was transferred on September 14 to Camp Sherman, Ohio, for further training. During the epidemic of influenza in October, 1918, the unit was assigned to the Camp Sherman base hospital for temporary duty. On October 28, the organization entrained for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived October 30; embarked on the Empress of Russia, November 10; left November 12, for Brest, France; arrived November 22, 1918. Upon arrival the unit was assigned to the Kerhuon hospital center for duty, but later the order was revoked and the unit placed under the camp surgeon, Camp Pontanezen, who assigned the officers and men to the various organizations of that camp for duty. A majority of the personnel was assigned to Camp Hospital No. 33 and the quarantine camp; others to the delousing plant, transport service and venereal camp. The organization never functioned as a hospital.

On February 7, 1919, Base Hospital No. 112 was ordered skeletonized to 1 officer and 5 enlisted men. The remainder of the unit continued their duties under the direction of the camp surgeon, Pontanezen Barracks. The skeletonized hospital sailed from Brest on the Ulua on March 23, 1919; arrived in the United States April 2, 1919, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., April 31, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Lewis H. McKinnie, M. C., September 30, 1918, to January 29, 1919.
Maj. Robert S. McCaughey, M. C., January 30, 1919, to February 7, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Lewis H. McKinnie, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Robert S. McCaughey, M. C.

dThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 112, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


731

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 113e

Base Hospital No. 113 was organized in August, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On August 20, the command was transferred to Camp Sherman, Ohio, for training at the camp base hospital. On November 1, the organization entrained for Camp Upton, N. Y., where it completed its overseas equipment, and sailed for Europe, November 12 on the Empress of Russia. It had arrived at Brest, France, November 22; proceeded to Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1; arrived November 25.

This organization was the fifth hospital unit to arrive at Savenay, where it immediately began to function as a part of the hospital center. It was assigned to a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, which already had been in operation under Base Hospital No. 69. The hospital plant was in various stages of construction, but was completed shortly after its occupancy by Base Hospital No. 113.

The professional activities of the unit began with its arrival, November 25, but the records of the unit continued to be operated by Base Hospital No. 69 until December 19, when all were taken up by Base Hospital No. 113. At Savenay, the unit performed the usual functions of a base hospital, and up to March 31, 1919, admitted 6,338 medical and surgical cases. This unit was designated as a hospital from which all disabled nurses were to be evacuated to the United States.

Base Hospital No. 113 ceased to function as a hospital on June 30, 1919. The personnel returned on the Santa Teresa; sailed from St. Nazaire on July 15, 1919; arrived in New York, July 27, 1919, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., August 1, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Edwin C. Henry, M. C., August 20, 1918, to January 26, 1919.
Maj. G. Milton Linthicum, M. C., January 27, 1919, to August 1, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. G. Milton Linthicum, M. C.
Maj. Charles L. Patton, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Edward T. Gallagher, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 114f

Base Hospital No. 114 was organized March 8, 1918, at Camp Crane, Pa., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large, and was given intensive training at Camp Crane. On June 5, the unit proceeded by rail to Hoboken, N. J.; embarked the same day on the Manchuria; sailed for France June 7;

eThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 113, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
fThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 114, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. J. A. Talbott, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


732

disembarked at St. Nazaire, France, June 19; remained in the rest camp there until June 21; entrained for Beau Desert, Department Gironde, base section No. 2; arrived, June 22, 1918.

Base Hospital No. 114 was the second hospital unit to arrive at Beau Desert, where it functioned as part of the hospital center. The organization occupied a type A, 1,000-bed unit, with an emergency expansion of 500 beds; later it expanded into two additional 1,500-bed units, and on November 7, 1918, the total bed capacity was 5,400. On the same date the number of patients in hospital was 4,596, the majority of whom required dressing and constant attention. They were cared for by a personnel consisting of 18 officers, 202 enlisted men, and 67 nurses. This state of affairs existed until the latter part of November, 1918, when another hospital unit reported in the center and took over one of the units operated by Base Hospital No. 114.

After the signing of the armistice, the hospital functioned as an evacuation hospital for orthopedic cases, and continued as such until February, 1919, when it was changed to a receiving hospital. The largest number of patients admitted was in October, 1918, when 5,130 were received. During its period of activity, the organization cared for more than 17,000 medical and surgical cases.

Base Hospital No. 114 ceased to function as a hospital April 16, 1919, and the personnel sailed from Bordeaux for New York, May 12, 1919, on the Panaman; arrived in the United States on May 23, and were demobilized at Camp Meade, Md., May 30, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. Harold W. Jones, M. C., March 13, 1918, to July 5, 1918.
Lieut. Col. George A. Craigin, M. C., July 6, 1918, to August 16, 1918.
Lieut. Col. J. A. Talbott, M. C., August 17, 1918, to May 30, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. Bert G. Cholett, M. C.
Capt. Robert D. Schreck, M. C.
Maj. Wallace Cole, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. George A. Craigin, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 115g

Base Hospital No. 115 was organized in June, 1918, at Camp May, N. J., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. When organized, this hospital was designated as a special head hospital, and its staff and equipment were selected with that point in view. The mobilization of the unit was completed during July, 1918, at the General Hospital No. 11, at Camp May, N. J. On August 5 the command proceeded to Camp Upton, Long Island, N. Y.; completed its overseas equipment; embarked August 15 on the Missenabie; left New York Harbor August 15; arrived at Liverpool, England, August 28;

gThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 115, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


733

entrained the same day for Brookwood, England; arrived the following day; remained encamped for four days; proceeded by rail to Southampton on September 1; crossed the English Channel the same night; landed at Cherbourg, France, September 2. On the following morning the organization left Cherbourg for Vichy, Department of Allier, intermediate section, and arrived on September 6. This was the third hospital unit to reach Vichy, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It was assigned to the Hotel Ruhl, a large concrete building nine stories high, with a capacity of 1,657 beds. This building had been operated by Base Hospital No. 1, and when taken over, on September 11, contained 822 patients. Later the capacity of the hospital was increased to 2,963 beds.

This hospital did not function as a special head hospital for which it was intended but received a large majority of the head cases coming to the center. During its period of activity, September 11, 1918, to February 12, 1919, 6,962 medical and surgical cases were admitted. The largest number of patients in hospital at one time was 2,778, on November 17, 1918; the greatest number of officer patients at one time was 240.

Base Hospital No. 115 ceased to function February 12, 1919, and sailed from St. Nazaire on the Mercury April 19, 1919; arrived at New York April 30; and the entire organization was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., by May 10, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Edward C. Ellett, M. C., June 28, 1918, to May 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Norval H. Pierce, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Daniel J. McCarthy, M. C.
Maj. Henry B. Doust, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 116h

Base Hospital No. 116 was organized December 20, 1917, at the Seventy-first Regiment Armory, New York City, from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit was under training at the armory until March 25, 1918, when it sailed from New York on the Mauretania; arrived at Liverpool, England, April 3; immediately proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel on the night of April 5; landed at Le Havre, France, April 6; entrained at Le Havre April 7 for Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department Vosges, in the advance section; arrived April 9. It was the third hospital unit to arrive at Bazoilles, where it functioned as an independent hospital until July 1; after July 1, 1918, it formed a part of the hospital center. It was assigned to a set of type A barracks, which were only partially complete, and had a crisis expansion in marquee tents, making a total capacity of 2,000 beds.

hA statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 116, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


734

The first patient was received June 2, 1918; during its period of active service the hospital cared for 5,837 medical and 6,603 surgical cases, with 1,259 operations. This hospital was designated as a special hospital for ear, nose, and throat and fracture cases in the hospital center. On July 20, 1918, Base Hospital No. 116 began to operate a neuropsychiatric department. This department functioned in a plant consisting of six wooden barracks, operated its own mess, and had its own specially trained personnel. During its service with Base Hospital No. 116 it admitted 1,048 cases, the majority of which were evacuated to the United States through Base Hospital No. 8 at Savenay.

On January 29, 1919, Base Hospital No. 116 ceased operating and turned over its patients and plant to Base Hospital No. 79. The personnel left the Bazoilles hospital center on March 19, 1919, and sailed from St. Nazaire March 28, 1919, on the Turrialba; arrived at Hoboken, N. J., April 13, 1919, and were demobilized shortly afterward.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. John W. Hanner, M. C., December 19, 1917, to June 27, 1918.
Lieut. Col. John B. Walker, M. C., June 28, 1918, to January 16, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Michael J. Thornton, M. C., January 17, 1919, to February 20, 1919.
Maj. Carlton W. Russell, M. C., February 21, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. John B. Walker, M. C.
Maj. Torr W. Harmer, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Theodore J. Abbott, M. C.
Capt. Frederic A. Alling, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 117i

Base Hospital No. 117 was organized in March, 1918, at Camp Crane, Pa., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. This unit was intended to serve as a neuropsychiatric hospital and was composed of officers, enlisted men, and nurses who had had previous experience with mental and nervous diseases. The unit was trained at Camp Crane until May 17, 1918, when it proceeded by rail to the port of embarkation; arrived at Hoboken, N. J., on the following day; embarked on the Saxon and left port May 19, 1918, for Liverpool, England; arrived May 31; entrained the same day for the rest camp at Romsey, England; arrived June 1 and remained until June 7; marched to Southampton; crossed the English Channel the same night; landed in Le Havre, France, June 8. On June 9, the command left Le Havre for Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure; arrived June 11; proceeded to its permanent station at La Fauche, Department of Haute Marne, advance section, June 15; arrived, June 16.

iThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 117, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


735

At La Fauche the hospital occupied 22 100-foot barracks, with a total bed capacity of 350. This plant was being operated by a detachment of 4 officers and 10 enlisted men who were amalgamated with the personnel of Base Hospital No. 117. Later, the capacity of the hospital was increased by the erection of additional barracks, so that at the conclusion of the war, the hospital had a capacity of 1,000 beds. It also had a convalescent camp, located about half a mile from the hospital, consisting of four buildings, three of which were used as dormitories and one as a mess hall and kitchen. A small and very attractive farm was leased for the accommodation of sick officers.

Base Hospital No. 117 was not a part of any hospital center; it functioned independently and admitted neuropsychiatric cases only. During its existence, 3,268 patients were admitted; of these 295 were nonpsychoneurotic cases, having been received through error; of the remaining number, about 91 per cent were returned to duty (classes A, B, and C).

Base Hospital No. 117 ceased to function January 12, 1919; its personnel were reassigned to various hospitals for duty and the hospital plant at La Fauche was abandoned, January 31, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Clarence R. Bell, M. C., March 4, 1918, to September 4, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Frederick W. Parson, M. C., September 5, 1918, to January 26, 1919.
Maj. Walter J. Otis, M. C., January 27, 1919, to January 31, 1919.

CHIEF OF SERVICE

Maj. Sidney I. Schwab, M. C.
Capt. Douglas A. Thom, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 118j

Base Hospital No. 118 was organized in September, 1918, at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit was in training at Camp Taylor until November 3, when it entrained for Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y.; sailed from New York November 13, 1918, on the Cedric for Liverpool, England; arrived November 24. On November 30, 1918, the organization arrived at Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1, France. It was the seventh hospital unit to arrive at Savenay, where it functioned as part of the hospital center.

The personnel of this hospital assisted other units in the center from the date of arrival until January 21, 1919, when it was reassembled and began to function as a hospital for contagious diseases. It took over the buildings formerly occupied by Base Hospital No. 214, consisting of 11 frame and 4 cement buildings and 6 large tents. On January 27, it assumed charge of the tuberculosis camp, formerly operated by Base Hospital No. 8. This camp

jThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 118, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


736

consisted of 13 hollow-tile buildings. The distance between these two hospitals was about 1 km., which necessitated the operation of separate messes and receiving wards.

During its active service the contagious disease section admitted 1,111, and the tuberculosis section 1,940 patients.

Base Hospital No. 118 ceased to function June 23, 1919, and the personnel returned to the United States; sailed from St. Nazaire, July 6, 1919, on the Matsonia; arrived in the United States, July 16, and were demobilized at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., shortly afterward.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. Thomas R. Payne, M. C., September 13, 1918, to March 23, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Thomas W. Burnett, M. C., March 24, 1919, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. William H. Carter, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Erle O. Daniels, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 119k

Base Hospital No. 119 was organized in September, 1918, at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The unit was attached to the base hospital of that camp for instructions and temporary duty. The organization left Camp Taylor October 26, for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived October 28; remained until October 30; proceeded to Hoboken, N. J.; embarked the same day on the Great Northern; sailed October 31 for Europe; arrived at Brest, France, November 9; marched to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks; remained until November 13; entrained at Brest for its permanent station at Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1; arrived, November 14. This was the fourth hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. The organization was assigned to unit No. 5, a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, already in operation as an auxiliary to Base Hospital No. 8.

For a short period the administration continued to be under Base Hospital No. 8, but professional duties were at once taken over by the personnel of Base Hospital No. 119, and in December, 1918, it also took over the records and administration.

Since its facilities were not such as would permit giving proper care to patients critically ill, this hospital functioned chiefly as a receiving and evacuating hospital for patients sufficiently convalescent to be classed as walking cases.

During its active service as a hospital it cared for 10,467 medical and surgical cases.

kThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 119, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Leeson O. Tarleton, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


737

Base Hospital No. 119 ceased to function June 22, 1919; its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire on the Matsonia July 6, 1919; arrived in the United States July 16, and were demobilized at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky., on July 21, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. William M. Chowning, M. C., September 1, 1918, to December 6, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Leeson O. Tarleton, M. C., December 7, 1918, to July 21, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. Francis M. Gorman, M. C.
Maj. William S. Titus, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Charles McC. Iseman, M. C.
Capt. Richard I. Dorge, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 120l

Base Hospital No. 120 was organized at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., on August 28, 1918, from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On September 10, 1918, the unit received orders to proceed to Camp Beauregard, La., and arrived at that station on September 12, 1918. On November 1, 1918, the unit left Camp Beauregard for Camp Upton, N. Y.; arrived November 5, 1918; remained until November 10; embarked on the Empress of Russia; sailed for Brest, France, November 12; arrived November 22; remained at the rest camp Pontanezen Barracks until December 10, 1918; proceeded to hospital center, Kerhuon, where it functioned under Base Hospital No. 65 until January 10, 1919.

On January 10, 1919, orders were received transferring the unit to Tours, at which station it arrived on January 15, 1919, and relieved Base Hospital No. 7, that organization being scheduled for return to the United States.

Base Hospital No. 120 continued to function at the hospital center, Joue-les-Tours, until June 10, 1919, when it ceased operating. On June 28, it sailed from St. Nazaire on the Marica; arrived in the United States on July 9, 1919. The unit remained at Camp Merritt, N. J., until July 13, 1919, on which date it was transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa, where it was demobilized July 16,
1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICERS

Maj. William J. McManus, M. C., August 28, 1918, to February 12, 1919.
Col. Edward W. Pinkham, M. C., February 13, 1919, to July 16, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Dalbert E. Hoover, M. C.

lThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 120, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


738

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Harry M. Lee, M. C.
Maj. Charles W. Knapp, M. C.
Lieut. Col. Rogers S. Morris, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 121m

Base Hospital No. 121 was organized in August, 1918, at Camp Beauregard, La., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization trained at Camp Beauregard until October 29, when it proceeded by rail to Camp Upton, N. Y., and arrived November 2, 1918. At Camp Upton, the unit remained for 10 days, completing its overseas equipment, and on November 12 it embarked on the Adriatic, leaving the following day, November 13, for Europe. It arrived at Liverpool, England, November 24; immediately proceeded by rail to Winchester and thence to Southampton; arrived November 25; crossed the English Channel the same night and landed at Le Havre, France, November 26. On November 27, the unit entrained for its permanent station, the hospital center at Beau Desert, Department of Gironde, base section No. 2, where it arrived November 29. Base Hospital No. 121 was the sixth hospital unit to arrive at the Beau
Desert hospital center, where it took over a type A, 1,000-bed hospital. The hospital did not receive patients until January 24, 1919, and up to March 31, 1919, a total of 2,629 medical and surgical cases had been admitted.

Base Hospital No. 121 ceased to function as a hospital June 21, 1919, and its personnel proceeded on June 24, 1919, to Bordeaux for transportation to the United States; sailed from Bordeaux June 29, 1919, on the Huron; arrived in the United States July 11, and were demobilized at Camp Dodge, Iowa, July 17, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Orville T. Rogers, M. C., August 22, 1918, to December 7, 1918.
Maj. Jule B. Frankenheimer, M. C., December 8, 1918, to February 6, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Otho A. Fiedler, M. C., February 7, 1919, to April 21, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Maj. Charles A. E. Codman, M. C., April 22, 1919, to July 17, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. Irwin W. Ditton, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. George W. Scupham, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 123n

Base Hospital No. 123 was organized September 5, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large, and was transferred September 9, 1918, to Camp Greene, N. C. The organization remained

mThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 121, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
nThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 123, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


739

in training at Camp Greene until October 28, on which date it left for Camp Mills, N. Y., arriving October 30. At Camp Mills the unit completed its overseas equipment; sailed from New York on the Adriatic for Europe, November 13; arrived at Liverpool, England, November 24; immediately entrained for Southampton; arrived on the following day; crossed the English Channel the same night; landed at Le Havre, France, November 26. After three days' rest at the Le Havre rest camp, the command proceeded by rail to its final destination, Mars-sur-Allier, Department of Nievre, in the intermediate section; arrived, December 2. This was the eighth hospital unit to reach Mars, where it functioned as a part of that hospital center. On December 5, the organization took over a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, which had been operated as an annex to Base Hospital No. 68, and which contained about 1,200 patients; these patients consisted mostly of classified (A and B) casuals from Base Hospital No. 68.

The hospital, taken over from Base Hospital No. 68, was not very well equipped, and on February 5, 1919, Base Hospital No. 123 took over the patients and the plant of Evacuation Hospital No. 30, which was a well-appointed hospital, having a thoroughly equipped operating room and X-ray apparatus.

Base Hospital No. 123 ceased to function April 20, 1919, and its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire June 23, 1919, on the Arizonan; arrived in the United States July 6, and were demobilized at Camp Pike, Ark., July 15, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Carlyle E. Sutphen, M. C., September, 1918, to July 15, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Thomas B. Carroll, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. August G. Wichman, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 131o

Base Hospital No. 131 was organized July 23, 1918, at Jefferson Barracks Mo., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. The organization trained at that station until September 25, when it entrained for Camp Upton, N. Y., where it arrived September 28. On account of the influenza epidemic, the unit was detained at Camp Upton for two weeks; sailed on the Ortega, October 13; arrived at Liverpool, England, October 24; entrained immediately for Winchester, England; arrived the following day. On October 26, the command proceeded by rail to Southampton; crossed the English Channel the same night, landed at Cherbourg, France, October 27; remained at the Cherbourg rest camp for five days; entrained for its permanent station, the hospital center at Mars-sur-Allier, Department of Nievre, in the inter-

oThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 131, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. H. H. Smith, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


740

mediate section, October 31; arrived November 3, 1918. It was the sixth hospital unit to reach Mars, where it functioned as a part of the hospital center. It was assigned to a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, and began to receive patients on November 18.

On January 15, 1919, the unit took over the patients and the plant of Base Hospital No. 14, of the same center, moving its own patients and offices to the new location. On January 20, the patients and equipment of Base Hospital No. 68 were taken over. At this time the hospital contained the largest number of patients, 1,034. During its period of activity, November 18, 1918, to April 10, 1919, 3,048 surgical and medical cases were admitted.

Base Hospital No. 131 ceased to function as a hospital on April 10, 1919, and its personnel sailed from Brest for New York, May 23, 1919, on the Frederick; arrived in the United States, June 2, and were demobilized at Camp Taylor, Ky., shortly afterwards.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Hubert H. Smith, M. C., July 23, 1918, to April 10, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Daniel F. Jones, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Duncan B. McEachern, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 136p

Base Hospital No. 136 was organized in September, 1918, at Camp Greenleaf, Ga., from officers and enlisted men of the Army at large. On September 10, 1918, the unit was transferred to Camp Wheeler, Ga., where it trained until October 18, when it left for Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there October 20. On October 25, it moved to Camp Upton, N. Y.; remained there until November 15, 1918; sailed on that date from New York on the La France; arrived at Brest, France, November 22; marched to the rest camp at Pontanezen Barracks; remained for one week and then proceeded by rail to its final destination, the hospital center at Vannes, Department Morbihan, base section No. 5; arrived December 1, 1918. It was the second hospital unit to arrive at that station, where it functioned as a part of a small two-unit hospital center. At Vannes, the unit was assigned to the Caserne Quartier Senarmont, formerly occupied by the French Thirty-fifth Field Artillery. These barracks consisted of three large four-story buildings, kitchens, guardhouse, stables, and several other buildings surrounded by a wall, forming an inclosure 760 by 860 feet.

The hospital received its first patients on December 16, 1918; during its active service it cared for approximately 3,000 surgical and medical cases.

pThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 136, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. Howard Fox, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


741

The bed capacity of the hospital was 2,300; the largest number of patients in hospital at one time was 1,558, on February 8, 1919; this included patients in an annex at Carnac.

On January 18, 1919, Base Hospital No. 136 took over patients and the plant of Base Hospital No. 236, which was located at Carnac, and whose personnel were amalgamated with Base Hospital No. 136.

Base Hospital No. 136 ceased to function as a hospital on June 9, 1919, and its personnel sailed from St. Nazaire for New York July 8, 1919, on the Manchuria; arrived in the United States, July 18, and were demobilized at Camp Upton, N. Y., July 24, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. Francis L. Quigley, M. C., September 10, 1918, to November 8, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Howard Fox, M. C., November 9, 1918, to July 24, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. Francis R. Haussling, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Mark Millikin, M. C.
Capt. Francis L. Quigley, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 202q

Base Hospital No. 202 was organized in France, in June, 1918, from officers and enlisted men of the American Expeditionary Forces at large. At this time it was known as Hospital A; later, in July, 1918, it was officially designated as Base Hospital No. 202. The nucleus of the personnel was taken from replacement unit A, which arrived at Blois, France, June 12, 1918. Base Hospital No. 202 was situated at Orleans, France, Department Loriet, in the intermediate section. This hospital operated in an excellent plant, consisting of several schools and barracks, all of which were well adapted for hospital purposes. All of the buildings were electrically lighted, some were steam heated; water was supplied in abundance.

The normal bed capacity on November 11, 1918, was 2,800, with provisions for expansion to 6,000 beds. During its period of activity, July 17, 1918, to February 17, 1919, the hospital cared for 3,127 medical cases and 2,717 surgical cases, with 887 operations. It was our only hospital unit at Orleans and functioned independently.

Base Hospital No. 202 ceased to function on February 17, 1919, when it was officially closed, all remaining patients having been transferred to other hospitals on February 16, 1918. On March 16, 1919, the organization proceeded to Brest; sailed April 7, on the Graf Waldersee; arrived at Hoboken, N. J., April 20, and was demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., April 27, 1919.

qThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 202, A. E. F.," by Lieut. Col. William H. Bishop, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


742

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. William H. Bishop, M. C., June, 1918, to April 27, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Lonnie W. Grove, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. J. H. Lawson, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 204r

Base Hospital No. 204 came into existence September 30, 1918, when the United States Military Hospital, Hursley Park, near Winchester, England, which had been operating since April 20, 1918, was designated by the chief surgeon of the American Expeditionary Forces as Base Hospital No. 204. This hospital, when it was started on April 20, 1918, by the hospital unit I, consisted of a group of 8 wards, each capable of accommodating 33 patients. These wards together with a few smaller outlying isolation wards and other buildings, were later known as the A group. The main group of wards, roofed and sided with galvanized iron, were connected with each other and with the administration building by corridors. Similarly constructed huts provided quarters, mess halls, and kitchens for the staff and nurses. The total bed capacity was 360; 30 beds of this number were reserved for British patients.

On September 30, definite plans were adopted for the enlargement of this institution; existing buildings were to be adapted as wards, kitchens, and personnel quarters; 16 new wards and nurses' quarters were under construction when the work was stopped by the signing of the armistice.

The bed capacity of the hospital when completed was to be 2,000, with additional 700 emergency beds. The total number of patients admitted during the existence of the hospital, April 20, 1918, to December 24, 1918, was 3,678. The greatest number of patients in the hospital at one time was 937, on November 15, 1918.

Base Hospital No. 204 was officially closed December 24, 1918, all of its patients being transferred to other hospitals in England. Prior to that date the personnel were reassigned for duty with various organizations in the American Expeditionary Forces.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. William J. Mixter, M. C., September 30, 1918, to December 24, 1918.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Thomas M. Jones, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Fred R. Jouett, M. C.

rThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 204, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


743

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 208s

Base Hospital No. 208 came into existence on November 1, 1918, when Camp Hospital No. 47, located at Autun, Soane et Loire, was officially designated Base Hospital No. 208. The hospital was located in a large three-story stone building, which before the war had been a school, and during the war, prior to its occupation by the United States, had been used by the French as a temporary hospital. The building was first taken over by the United States in June, 1918, but did not function as a hospital until the first week in August, when Base Hospital No. 45 arrived and took possession. This unit remained only a short time and was then transferred elsewhere. On September 24 a medical officer and 50 enlisted men arrived and began functioning as Camp Hospital No. 47. On November 1, 1918, Camp Hospital No. 47 became Base Hospital No. 208, functioning as such until the middle of December, 1918, when all patients were evacuated, the property was returned to the medical supply depot, and on December 31, 1918, the entire personnel left Autun for Bordeaux to take over Base Hospital No. 6.

The organization arrived at Bordeaux on January 2, 1919, and on January 15 took over all patients, property, and records of Base Hospital No. 6. During its existence, Base Hospital No. 208 evacuated a total of 6,575 cases, of which 4,950 were ambulatory, without dressing. Base Hospital No. 208 ceased to function June 1, 1919, and its personnel sailed on the Alphonso for the United States on June 13; arrived in the United States June 24, 1919; and were demobilized on June 27, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Gustavus M. Blech, M. C., November 1, 1918, to June 1, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. Raymond M. Spivy, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Franklin A. Martin, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 210t

Base Hospital No. 210 was organized November 1, 1918, at Toul, Department of Meurthe-et-Moselle, in the advance section, where it functioned as a convalescent hospital for the Toul hospital center. The personnel comprised officers and enlisted men taken from various organizations on duty at that center. A majority of the enlisted men were class A and B patients assigned from other hospitals of the group.

The hospital was located in the Caserne Marechal Ney, which consisted of an 8-acre parade ground in a rectangle, around which three large 4-story buildings, two 2-story buildings and three 1-story mess halls were grouped;

sThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 208, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.
tThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 210, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


744

the total bed capacity was 3,500. The buildings when taken over were in a very insanitary condition and required many repairs, but were well suited for a hospital. The institution was opened for patients November 4, 1918. On April 1, 1919, Base Hospital No. 210 ceased to function as a convalescent hospital and took over the patients and quarters of Base Hospital No. 78, the latter organization being under orders to return to the United States.

Base Hospital No. 210 operated as a hospital from April 1 to 27, when it was closed and prepared for return to the United States. During its service as a convalescent hospital, November 4, 1918, to March 31, 1919, it handled 5,845 patients. It was ordered to return to the United States, June 9, 1919; sailed on that date from Brest on the New Amsterdam for New York; arrived June 19; and was demobilized at the Presidio of San Francisco, Calif., on June 30, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Bertram F. Alden, M. C., November 1, 1918, to December 23, 1918.
Maj. Francis G. Aud, M. C., December 24, 1918, to June 30, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Francis G. Aud, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. Thomas G. Miller, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 214u

Base Hospital No. 214 came into existence November 6, 1918, at Savenay, Department Loire Inferieure, in the base section No. 1, when the neuropsychiatric service of Base Hospital No. 8 was organized into an independent unit, and designated Base Hospital No. 214. This hospital functioned as a special hospital for mental and neurological patients and occupied a plant consisting of 10 wooden, knock-down type of barracks. In January, 1919, when the admission rate increased, the unit was assigned to a type A, 1,000-bed hospital, the construction of which was not completed; and as special construction was necessary, this was done chiefly by the patients.

The personnel of the institution changed a great deal, as it furnished officers and enlisted men to supervise transportation of convoys of patients to the United States, and exercised supervision until patients were delivered to their destination there. The convoys consisted as a rule of from 50 to 200 cases, occasionally more. From November 1, 1918, to February 28, 1919, this hospital admitted 6,093 cases; the greatest number treated at one time was 700, including 40 officers.

Base Hospital No. 214 ceased to function June 21, 1919, and the personnel returned to the United States on the Scranton; sailed from St. Nazaire for New York July 6, 1919; arrived July 16, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 22, 1919.

uThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 214, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


745

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Sanger Brown, M. C., November 6, 1918, to March 20, 1919.
Lieut. Col. Jesse M. W. Scott, M. C., March 21, 1919, to July 22, 1919.

CHIEF OF THE SERVICES

Maj. Joseph B. Betts, M. C.
Maj. Charles D. Humes, M. C.
Lieut. Col. Sanger Brown, M. C.
Maj. J. J. Hughes, M. C.
Maj. Arthur H. Ruggles, M. C.
Maj. Henry M. Swift, M. C.
Maj. Joseph W. Moore, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 216v

Base Hospital No. 216 was organized November 1, 1918, at the Nantes hospital center, Department Loire Inferieure, base section No. 1. The personnel were taken from base hospitals stationed within the center. The unit was assigned to a standard type A, 1,000-bed hospital of cement, fiber construction, with an emergency expansion to 1,800 beds. When taken over, it contained about 1,200 patients, the overflow from Base Hospitals Nos. 11 and 38. The hospital handled chiefly medical cases. The greatest number of patients in the hospital at one time was 1,514 on November 7, 1918.

In addition to its formal functions, the hospital was designated a special hospital for all communicable diseases and all complicated cases of venereal disease of the center; the latter service admitted a total of 590 cases. Base Hospital No. 216 also functioned as a camp infirmary for the personnel of the entire hospital center. In January, 1919, the hospital was designated as the evacuation hospital for the center, and all patients evacuated directly to the United States were sent through this unit. A total of 6,367 patients were handled by the evacuation department.

Base Hospital No. 216 ceased to function on June 21, 1919, and its personnel returned to the United States; sailed from St. Nazaire, July 6, 1919, on the Matsonia; arrived in the United States July 16, and were demobilized at Camp Dix, N. J., July 21, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. Robert B. Pratt, M. C., November 1, 1918, to July 21, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. John F. Park, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. Henry H. Kleinpell, M. C.

vThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 216, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


746

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 218w

Base Hospital No. 218 came into existence November 5, 1918, at Poitiers, France, Department of Vienne, intermediate section, when Camp Hospital No. 61 was designated Base Hospital No. 218. The hospital was located in the following buildings: The Ancienne Séminaire, bed capacity 400, used largely for surgical cases; the École de Théologie, bed capacity 325, used for medical cases; part of the University of Poitiers, bed capacity 250; and the Caserne d'Abbeville with bed capacity of 1,000. The total capacity of the hospital was 2,000 beds. During its activity as a base hospital it cared for 1,114 surgical and medical cases.

Base Hospital No. 218 was not a part of any hospital center and operated independently. This organization functioned as a base hospital for only three months, and on February 13, 1919, it reverted to its former status, that of Camp Hospital No. 61. The majority of the personnel, including the commanding officer, were reassigned to Camp Hospital No. 61 for duty, and Base Hospital No. 218 ceased to exist February 13, 1919.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Maj. Ernest L. Bell, M. C., November 5, 1918, to February 13, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Capt. John W. McGuire, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Capt. John P. Howser, M. C.

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 236:x

Base Hospital No. 236 came into existence November 18, 1918, at Carnac and Quiberon, Department Morbihan, in base section No. 1, when Camp Hospital No. 92 was designated Base Hospital No. 236. This hospital functioned only a short time as a base hospital and was a part of the Vannes hospital center. It operated in the towns of Carnac, Quiberon, and Plouharnel, with a total bed capacity of 1,000. At Carnac the unit occupied 1 hotel and 5 villas, which were well suited for hospital purposes, and had a capacity of 200 beds. At Quiberon it occupied 12 small summer hotels and villas, scattered over the town, only 2 of which held more than 100 beds. The hospitalization at Quiberon was extremely difficult and unsatisfactory; there were neither heat, light, nor bathing facilities. The patients were scattered all over the town, were hard to control, and discipline was bad. The distance to the hospital center at Vannes was 30 miles and to Carnac 10
miles; this made it very difficult to supply and control the hospital. The unit functioned only two months and during that time cared for 1,131 surgical and medical cases.

wThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 218, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C .-Ed.
xThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 236, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


747

On January 18, 1919, Base Hospital No. 236 was dissolved and its personnel were transferred to Base Hospital No. 136 at Vannes. The buildings at Carnac and Plouharnel were taken over and operated by Base Hospital No. 136.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Lieut. Col. William E. Butler, M. C., November 18, 1918, to January 18, 1919.

CHIEF OF THE SERVICES

Capt. N. Worth Brown, M. C.

FIG. 147.-Base Hospital No. 236, Carnac

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 238y

Base Hospital No. 238 was organized November 20, 1918, at Rimaucourt, Department Haute Marne, in the advance section, and its personnel were drawn from Base Hospitals Nos. 52, 58, 59, and 64, already stationed in that center. This was the fifth base hospital to join the Rimaucourt hospital center, where it occupied a type A, 1,000-bed hospital. It was designated as a special hospital for eye, ear, nose, and throat, skin and genitourinary diseases, and contained the central laboratory and morgue. It also maintained an outdoor clinic in all of its departments, and many patients from the surrounding area, as well as from other hospitals of the center, were treated as ambulatory cases.

yThe statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 238, A. E. F.," by the commanding officer of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-Ed.


748

Whenever surgical, medical, or dental cases were found in the hospital, they were transferred, upon the advice of the chief of the service concerned, to another hospital.

Base Hospital No. 238 existed less than three months and during that time cared for 802 patients. The unit ceased operating on January 26, 1919, and was disbanded at Rimaucourt on February 15, 1919, and Base Hospital No. 238, the last base hospital to be organized in the World War, ceased to exist.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Capt. Robert E. Hale, M. C., November 20, 1918, to December 25, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Sidney J. Meyers, M. C., December 26, 1918, to February 15, 1919.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Maj. Edmund R. Brush, M. C.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Maj. John J. Madigan, M. C.

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