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Chapter XIV

Contents

CHAPTER XIV

THE DIVISION OF HOSPITALIZATION

GENERAL OUTLINE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ACTIVITIES

The broader activities of the hospitalization division, especially in so far as they pertained to projects, procurement, and organization of hospitals, general control of the professional services, Medical Department transportation, and evacuation of patients, are described in other chapters of this volume. This chapter has to do only with a general outline of this division's development and activities.

Securing adequate hospital beds was one of the earliest tasks, and continued to be one of the greatest and most difficult of the Medical Department of the American Expeditionary Forces until after the armistice had been signed.1 That the needs as to hospital beds were met, generally speaking, and that there was always a surplus of several thousand hospital beds, were the results of great effort and the use of all possible expendients to utilize available resources to the utmost.2

The necessity for close cooperation between the Medical Department of the American Expeditionary Forces and the medical services of our Allies, especially France, in the provision of hospital facilities was apparent from the outset.1 Prior to the arrival of headquarters, A. E. F., the question of hospitals had been taken up with the French Minister of War, and a Medical Department member of the American mission with a medical officer of the French Army had made an extensive inspection trip with a view of determining what French military hospitals might be available and suitable for the American Expeditionary Forces.1 All Atlantic ports in France were visited and their hospital facilities investigated,1 so that even before the arrival of our first contingent of troops it was possible for the French to begin work for us on a camp hospital at St. Nazaire, and for the existing French hospitals in the vicinity of that port to be evacuated and prepared for transfer to the American Expeditionary Forces as soon as American personnel became available.1

After the arrival in France of the chief surgeon, A. E. F., he and the American medical officer above referred to covered almost the same itinerary as that followed in the inspection trip which the latter already had conducted, with a view of locating hospitals and Medical Department supply depots and of procuring immediate facilities for the medical service of the troops then expected.1

When organization of the chief surgeon's office was amplified, July 28, 1917, the hospital division of that office was charged with all questions that concerned the Medical Department pertaining to the location, procurement, construction, and repair of hospitals, the care and evacuation of sick and wounded, the provision and control of hospital trains, ambulances and barges, and the training of Medical Department personnel.3 The chief of this division was also designated liaison officer between the American and French medical services. The great


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majority of Medical Department questions which required negotiation during the early formative period of the American Expeditionary Forces pertained to the procurement of hospitals and the determination of general policies.1

When the chief surgeon for the line of communications was assigned, July 18, 1917, he was charged with certain duties then carried out by the office of the chief surgeon, A. E. F.4 These were to include control of base hospitals, medical supplies and personnel in the line of communications. However, until headquarters, A. E. F., moved, September 1, 1917, from Paris to Chaumont, there was very close contact between the chief surgeons of the American Expeditionary Forces and of the line of communications in matters pertaining to hospitalization as well as other affairs.1 Thereafter, in so far as hospitals were concerned, the office of the chief surgeon, A. E. F., while located at Chaumont, was more particularly concerned with procurement of facilities and general policies concerning hospitals. Very important parts of this service pertained to the fixation of the bed capacity of base, camp and evacuation hospitals, the determination of the duty personnel required to serve units of each class, the provision of convalescent camps and depots, and the preparation of the plans and specifications for hospital construction.5 On the other hand, the office of the chief surgeon, line of communications, was concerned with establishment of fixed hospitals throughout the expanding territory of the lines of communications, the provision for their supply and the control of their administration. When headquarters and the supply and administrative services of the American Expeditionary Forces were reorganized by General Orders, No. 31, G. H. Q., A. E. F., February 16, 1918, the chief surgeon moved with the chiefs of most other administrative staffs to Tours, where his office absorbed that of the chief surgeon, line of communications.1 Two of the officers who had been identified with the hospitalization division of the chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., remained at Chaumont, one of them being detailed to serve as representative of the chief surgeon with the general staff, the other with the fourth section of that body (with which the representative of the chief surgeon, at G. H. Q., soon identified himself). Another officer was now placed at the head of the hospital division.1 This division was now charged with general matters pertaining to hospitalization, administration and evacuation, while the medical officers attached to G-4 were charged with the hospitalization of the armies in the field, the location and procurement of sites of fixed hospitals, negotiations with the French Mission, and broad questions of general policy which required action by the general staff.1 Their activities in these matters conformed to the plans of the hospitalization division of the chief surgeon's office at Tours.1 This division, as ultimately organized, administered the duties outlined above in the manner shown in the following schedule:6


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HOSPITALIZATION AND EVACUATION DIVISION

(Corrected to November 1, 1918)

A. General administration (one officer).

B. Procurement and construction section (five officers).
  Hospital projects.
  Transfer of hospital and property from French central authorities.
  Offers of land and buildings for hospital purposes.
  Leasing of land, buildings; etates des lieux.
  Hospital plans and construction.
  Repairs to hospitals.
  Sanitary appliances, plumbing, water, sewerage, light.
  Procurement and distribution of tentage.
  Coordination with engineers, railroad and construction, and quartermaster.
  Inspection and reports on all included in above items.
  Reference maps and graphic charts.

C. Administration and policy section (six officers).
  Hospitals:
Centers.
Base.
Camp.
Convalescent (hospitals and camps).
Special.
Red Cross (military and homes).
  Boards:
Disability.
Classification.
General.
  Inspections:
Action on reports.
Authorization of.
Action on complaints.
  Instruction:
Officers.
Enlisted men.
  Personnel requirements:
Medical.
Quartermaster.
Engineers.
Etc.
  Regulations: General policy of.
  War diary hospitalization section.
  Historical record of hospitalization.
  Coordination of administration with other departments and professional section.

D. Personnel and equipment; statistical and liaison section (two officers).
  (1) Daily bed report of base hospitals and convalescent camps.
  Weekly bed report of all hospitals.
  Monthly bed and authorization report of all hospitals.
  Statistical tables.
  (2) Liaison, chief quartermaster's office reference:
  (a) Laundries.
  (b) Bakeries.
  (c) Fuel.
  (d) Subsistence.
  (e) Ranges, stoves, etc., for hospitals.
  (3) Care of and location of Medical Department units arriving from United States.
  (4) Installation of new hospitals, initial equipment and supplies.
  (5) Assembly and shipment of mobile hospitals and mobile surgical units.


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E. Evacuation and transportation section (six officers).

Primary, secondary, and special evacuation of sick and wounded.
Collection of evacuables of class D and their assembly at base ports for transfer to the United States.
Transfer and assembly of special classes of patients at special hospitals.
Liaison with Navy Department representatives reference to transfer patients to home ports by Navy transports.
Liaison with French mission reference to disposition American patients in French hospitals.
Liaison with British mission reference to disposition American patients in British hospitals.
Liaison with troop movement bureau reference to routing evacuables from hospitals to casual depots, depot divisions, and regulating stations.
Liaison with armies and general headquarters through representatives at regulating stations.
Records and statistics of evacuations.
Hospital trains, personnel, supply, inspections and regulations, requirements and specifications, auditing of accounts for purchases and  rental.
Motor transportation. Shipments from United States, arrivals and shortages in France, losses, furnishing of transportation and equipment by other agencies. Records of transportation for identification; registration cards; assignment of motor transportation in Services of Supply and to arriving sanitary trains.
Records of assembling, repairs, maintenance, and storage of equipment. Personnel, supply, inspections and regulations for evacuation ambulance companies.
Service of light, railway, and canal. Construction of cars and appliances for supporting litters. Records of transportation. Obtaining sanitary personnel for this service.
Liaison with railway transport service and Motor Transport Corps and light railway and canal service.

Under the immediate jurisdiction of the hospitalization division, but not actually pertaining to it, was the group of professional consultants at Neufchateau. These consultants supplemented the purely official activities of the hospitalization division by their supervision and direction of the technical, medical, and surgical services rendered the patients in hospital.7

Instructions concerning the partitioning of military hospitals into two classes, and the determination of the field of Medical Department responsibility in the control of hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Services of Supply were published, as follows:

Bulletin No. 29.

                          AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES,
                          HEADQUARTERS, SERVICES OF SUPPLY,
                            France, August 30, 1918.

1. All hospitals, except evacuation and field hospitals, are hereby designated as S. O. S. (Services of Supply) formations. These hospitals are divided into two classes. The first class includes hospital centers and base or special hospitals disconnected from hospital centers. The second class includes camp or other hospitals serving purely local purposes.

2. Hospitals of the first class have the status of general hospitals and are under the control of the commanding generals of the sections in which they are located only in the matter of discipline, guard, inspection, construction, supply, and fire protection. They are under the direct control of chief surgeon, A. E. F., in all other matters, including general administration, control of personnel, care and evacuation of the sick and wounded, etc.

3. Commanding officers of hospitals of the first class have the responsibility and authority of post commanders in addition to their duty in connection with the general management


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of the hospitals. They are authorized to appoint disability boards for the service of their hospitals, as provided in section 1, G. O. 41, G. H. Q., A. E. F., 1918. They are authorized to communicate direct with the American Red Cross convalescent homes and to issue the necessary orders to send cases to such homes, where accommodations are available.

4. They will apply to section commanders for necessary guards. The commander of such guard, if a commissioned officer, will report to the medical officer commanding for instructions as to the character of the guard duty to be preformed and he will exercise no control over the sanitary formation. If the guard be reported by a noncommissioned officer, it will be under the immediate control of the medical officer of the day.

5. Hospitals of the second class, including those serving school areas, are under the control of the commanding generals of the sections in which they are located. This control will be exercised through the surgeon on the staff of the section commander.

6. Supplies for hospitals, except medical supplies, and allotments for repairs will be obtained from headquarters of the section in which the hospital is located. Medical supplies will be obtained by requisition on depots in the manner specified from time to time by the chief surgeon.

By command of Major General Harbord:

JOHNSON HAGOOD, Chief of Staff.

Official:

L. H. BASH, Adjutant General.

Such of the activities of the American National Red Cross as were conducted in the American Expeditionary Forces and as pertained to military hospitilization and supplies were under the control of G-4.5 In the zone of the armies, the hospitals of this society were under the control of G-4-B; i. e., the Medical Department element of the fourth section of the general staff.5 When American Red Cross hospitals were taken over by the Army they became part of its effective hospitalization service, and as such were under the supervision of the hospitalization division of the chief surgeon's office.5

Though a large number of possible locations for hospitals had been selected prior to the transfer of the chief surgeon's office from Chaumont, the need for others steadily progressed. When the hospitalization division desired further procurement it so notified the chief surgeon's representative at general headquarters.5 In discharging this duty, the group with G-4 would learn whether the site proposed had a prior claim upon it either by the French or by another branch of our service; whether railway facilities (e. g., strength of bridges) were such that it was readily accessible by trains carrying patients from the front and by others bringing supplies from the rear; whether the terrain was suitable, if new construction was planned, or whether available buildings were approximately satisfactory if use of such structures was contemplated; whether the water supply was adequate, etc.5 Suitability of the terrain had been a factor in the early tentative selection of each site, but this was reexamined when information was received designating definitely the number of buildings that would be necessary for a specific project.5

Efforts were made in advance to prepare hospital facilities for arriving troops. To this end surgeons of base sections were directed to make preliminary arrangements for the care of the sick of incoming troops, and to notify surgeons of the same concerning the hospitalization and transportation of their sick pending the establishment of their own infirmaries and camp hospitals.8

In order that hospitals might be established and equipped before the arrival of troops, the chief surgeon, A. E. F., notified the assistant chief of staff, G-4,


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general headquarters, that he would have to be informed sufficiently in advance as to the training areas to which the troops concerned would go.9 He also notified the assistant chief of staff, G-3, that each division surgeon should come to France with the advance party of the division to make the necessary hospital preparation.10

On request of the hospitalization division to the supply division of the chief surgeon's office, property was shipped to different hospitals without requisition by the commanding officer of the hospital concerned. Such property included equipment for base hospitals,11 complete, crisis expansion equipment,12 disinfectors,13 and a wide range of other supplies and material including tentage.11 Similarly, the hospitalization division made application upon the American Red Cross for a variety of supplies and installations (e. g., portable ice machines)14 and upon the chief quartermaster for equipment of incoming hospitals with such items as heating stoves,15 ranges, marmites, hot water reservoirs, cooking utensils, and messing equipment.16 Its activities extended into great detail for it formulated lists of the quota of heating stoves and cooking ranges necessary for each type of unit, itemized the utensils which should accompany each range,16 and detailed the equipment of ward diet kitchens,17 of American Red Cross diet kitchens18 and specified articles comprising a surgical ward dressing unit,19 the equipment for a 1,000-bed tent crisis expansion,20 the furniture unit for a tent ward,21 the furniture unit for a ward containing normal beds,22 and prescribed in explicit detail the character and quantity of all supplies authorized for each of the different types of hospitals and for each department of a hospital. It supervised the organization, selection and provision of equipment for mobile hospitals, mobile surgical units and other newly created and specialized hospital agencies, as well as of the base or camp hospitals discharging their usual service, procured authorization for convalescent camps and prescribed their organization, equipment and operation.23 It notified the division of laboratories of the arrival and assignment of base hospitals in order that the division of laboratories might make appropriate contact with the respective laboratory services.24 Some hospitals were assigned to the service of particular classes of cases, such as cases of psychoneurosis, tuberculosis, bone and joint, cranial and maxillofacial injuries.25 The proper selection of specialist personnel for assignment, their supervision and the procurement and distribution of technical equipment were essential in order that satisfactory results might be attained in the treatment of patients.25 That part of the Medical Department which was charged with the professional care of patients was under control of the hospitalization division.26 It was also necessary that special foodstuffs be provided and that personnel and equipment suitable for their preparation be furnished.27 The provision of labor, fuel, pure water, illumination, and transportation were a few of the other interests of the hospital service throughout the American Expeditionary Forces. The hospitalization division was thus charged with the provision of hospital needs, for their satisfaction, the utilization of resources to the best advantage, and general administration of the service of hospitalization and evacuation.27 The fact that over three thousand items were listed among the supplies required by the Medical Department (most of these pertaining to its hospital service) illustrated the highly technical character of the professional services rendered.27


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The hospital division of the chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., conducted its general administration by means of instructions which were incorporated in circulars, circular letters and memoranda from the chief surgeon's office, and by telegrams, letters or telephone conversations with the parties interested. Inspections were conducted by general inspectors, by members of the hospitalization and finance divisions of the chief surgeon's office and by the professional consultants.28 Information was also disseminated by the Weekly Bulletin published by the chief surgeon's office.28 Special inspectors constantly visited the hospitals to instruct the inexperienced in military methods of administration, to secure the formulation of more accurate reports, and to improve all elements of the service discharged by those units.29

The gravest difficulty which the hospitalization division experienced arose from the lack of adequate personnel for fixed hospitals. As stated in Chapter V of this section, base hospitals were stripped of all available officers, nurses, and men to form operating and other teams for service in the zone of the armies and to staff the camp hospitals. Provision of personnel for the last mentioned units, the chief surgeon declared, was the most difficult problem of the Medical Department in the American Expeditionary Forces.30

The hospitalization division compiled two consolidated bed reports, a weekly report31 and a daily report.32 Both of these were based upon telegraphic reports of bed status (number of designated beds, both normal and crisis expansion, and occupied and vacant) received from the various stationary hospitals in the Services of Supply. The purpose of the weekly consolidated report was to have at hand, not only for the chief surgeon but also for headquarters, Services of Supply, and headquarters, general headquarters, a complete statement of the hospital bed situation, in order that the necessity for the additional provision of hospital beds could be foreseen.

The hospitalization division did not require at first that bed reports of field hospitals when operating as purely divisional units be submitted to the chief surgeon's office direct.32 Later it was required that weekly bed reports be telegraphed by field and evacuation hospitals, direct to the chief surgeon's office, and a form for this was prescribed.33 Weekly telegraphic bed reports were required of the chief surgeons of the several armies.34 Considerable difficulty was experienced in the effort to keep a correct, consolidated report of the hospitals attached to combat units; consequently, on September 21, 1918, the chief surgeon requested his representative with the general staff to notify him of changes of status of all hospitals attached to combat units.35 Frequently units, such as field, evacuation, and mobile hospitals, arrived in France, opened, closed, and combined, etc., without word being received by the chief surgeon's office.35 The chief surgeon's representative at general headquarters replied to the effect that in time of active operations compliance with the above instructions would be very difficult largely because of the difficulties of communication between the division and corps surgeons and the latter officers and the army surgeon. Positive orders of general headquarters prohibited telephoning or telegraphing any information concerning a military location except in code, and code books were not supplied to any unit smaller than a regiment. The chief surgeon's representative stated further that this information would undoubtedly be


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furnished when the organization became a smoother working machine, but that it would have to be supplied by mail, which was a very uncertain method of communication.36

In the late spring of 1918, when our Medical Department took over from the French the medical service to the rear of our combat divisions,5 the necessity arose for having at hand a constantly corrected record of the hospital bed situation. The hospitalization division of the chief surgeon's office not only had to assign to a regulating station a definite number of beds for casualties being evacuated from the front, but also must know to which hospitals farther to the rear patients in hospitals nearer the front could be cleared. Obviously weekly telegraphic reports from hospitals would be totally inadequate for the purpose; consequently, daily bed reports now were required from all stationary hospitals in a manner similar to that in which the weekly reports were made.32 It was this daily report of the bed situation in the hospitals of the Services of Supply, with which the evacuation section of the hospitalization division was most concerned.

On the date the armistice was signed the hospitalization division included 41 per cent of the 61 officers then on duty in the chief surgeon's office, a fact which illustrates the relative extent of its activities.36

After the signing of the armistice the hospitalization division was concerned chiefly with the cancellation of projects, the transfer of patients to base ports for evacuation to the United States, the closure of hospitals, and the storage of hospital equipment and supplies.37

The hospitalization activities of the chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., were continued along the lines outlined above until the American Expeditionary Forces were succeeded first by the American forces in France and then by the American forces in Germany.30

PERSONNELa

(July 28, 1917, to July 15, 1919)

    Brig. Gen. James D. Glennan, M. C., chief.
    Col. John L. Shepard, M. C., chief.
    Col. Sanford W. Wadhams, M. C., chief.

PROCUREMENT AND CONSTRUCTION SECTION

    Col. James D. Fife, M. C., chief.
    Col. Arnold D. Tuttle, M. C., chief.

      Lieut. Col. Rolf Floyd, M. C.
      Capt. John A. P. Millett, M. C.
      Capt. Martin D. Mims, San. Corps.
      Capt. Harold Rich, San. Corps.
      Capt. Donald V. Trueblood, M. C.
      First Lieut. Garrett S. De Grange, jr., San. Corps.
      First Lieut. Peter A. Lelong, San. Corps.
      First Lieut. George E. Russell, San. Corps.

    aIn this list have been included the names of those who at one time or another were assigned to the division during the period July 28, 1917, to July 15, 1919.
    There are two primary groups-the heads of the division or the section and the assistants. In each group names have been arranged alphabetically, by grades, irrespective of chronological sequence of service.


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ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY SECTION

    Col. Frederick P. Reynolds, M. C., chief.
    Col. John L. Shepard, M. C., chief.
    Lieut. Col. Leartus J. Owen, M. C., chief.

      Col. Shelley V. Marietta, M. C.
      Maj. Earnest L. Scott, San. Corps.

PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT; STATISTICAL AND LIAISON SECTION

    Col. Thomas H. Johnson, M. C., chief.
    Lieut. Col. Lucius L. Hopwood, M. C., chief.

EVACUATION AND TRANSPORTATION SECTION

    Col. Robert M. Culler, M. C., chief.
    Col. George P. Peed, M. C., chief.
    Col. Frank W. Weed, M. C., chief.

      Lieut. Col. Howard Clarke, M. C.
      Capt. James E. Barney, San. Corps.
      Capt. Joseph E. Murray, San. Corps.

    REFERENCES

    (1) Wadhams, S. H., Col., M. C., and Tuttle, A. D., Col., M. C.: Some of the early problems of the Medical Department,  A. E. F., The Military Surgeon Washington, D. C., December, 1919, xlv, No. 6, 636.

    (2) Final report of Gen. John J. Pershing, September 1, 1919, 77.

    (3) War diary, chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., July 28, 1917. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (4) War diary, chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., July 21, 1917. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (5) Report from the chief of the medical group, G-4 section of the general staff, G. H. Q., A. E. F., to the chief of G-4, general staff, G. H. Q., A. E. F., December 31, 1918. Subject: Activities of G-4-B, for the period embracing the beginning and end of American participation in hostilities. Copy on file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (6) Schedule of organization of hospitalization and evacuation division (corrected to November 1, 1918). On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (7) Report from Col. W. L. Keller, M. C., director of professional services, A. E. F., to the chief surgeon, A. E. F., December 31, 1918. Subject: Brief outline of the organization and activities of the professional services between April, 1918, and December 31, 1918. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (8) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to surgeon, Base Section No. 2, October 14, 1918. Subject: Hospitalization of incoming troops. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (9) Memorandum from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to assistant chief of staff, G-4, G. H. Q., A. E. F., October 13, 1918. Subject: Notification of incoming divisions. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (10) Memorandum from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the assistant chief of staff, G-3, October 21, 1918. Subject: Division surgeon with advance party. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).


    238

    (11) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the commanding officer, Base Hospital No. 14, A. E. F., July 28, 1918. Subject: Equipment. On file, World War Division, A. G. O., chief surgeon's files (322.32911.)

    (12) Memorandum from the chief of hospitalization division to the chief of the supply division, July 11, 1918. Subject: Crisis expansion equipment. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (13) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to commanding officer, Camp Hospital No. 27, August 5, 1918. Subject: Replacement of Quartermaster Department disinfectors, On file, World War Division, A. G. O., chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (14) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the chief of Army Transport Service, June 8, 1919. Subject: Request shipment of portable ice machines. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (15) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the chief quartermaster, A. E. F., July 5, 1918. Subject: Heating stoves. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (414.2).

    (16) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the chief quartermaster, A. E. F., May 31, 1918. Subject: Equipment. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (414.2).

    (17) Equipment of ward unit, diet kitchens (undated). On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (414.2).

    (18) Red Cross diet kitchen equipment list (undated). On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (414.2).

    (19) Memorandum from chief of hospitalization division, chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., to chief of supply division, June 19, 1918. Subject: List of articles comprising a surgical ward dressing unit. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (442).

    (20) List showing "Equipment to be ordered for 1,000 beds-tent crisis expansion, 24 wards." On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (440.1).

    (21) "Furniture unit for a tent ward." On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (440.1)1.

    (22) "Furniture unit-ward." On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (440.1).

    (23) Statement based on general correspondence concerning hospitalization. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (322.32911).

    (24) Report from Col. J. F. Siler, M. C., director of laboratories and infectious diseases, to the chief surgeon, A. E. F. (undated). Subject: Activities of the division of laboratories and infectious diseases, from August, 1917, to July, 1919. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (25) Report of the activities, hospital center, Vichy; also, report of the activities of Base Hospital No. 117, prepared under the direction of the respective commanding officers (undated). On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (26) Schematic chart of Medical Department organization, A. E. F. Approved by the commander in chief, A. E. F., March 6, 1918. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (27) Report from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the commanding general, A. E. F., April 17, 1919. Subject: The Medical Department, A. E. F., to November 11, 1918. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (28) Statement based on circulars, circular letters, and weekly bulletins, published by the chief surgeon's office, A. E. F. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (29) Report from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the commanding general, A. E. F. (undated), Subject: Outline report of chief surgeon, A. E. F. Copy on file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (30) Report from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, May 1, 1919. Subject: Activities of the chief surgeon's office, A. E. F., to May 1, 1919. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

    (31) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the commanding officers of base, camp, and Red Cross hospitals, May 17, 1918. Subject: Weekly bed reports. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (632.1).


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    (32) First indorsement, from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to commanding officer, 164th Field Hospital Co., June 20, 1918; on letter from the commanding officer, 164th Field Hospital Co. to the chief surgeon, A. E. F., June 16, 1918. Subject: Daily report of patients in hospital. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (632.1).

    (33) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to the chief surgeon, Third Army, January 17, 1919. Subject: Weekly telegraphic bed reports. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (632.1).

    (34) Letter from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to chief surgeon, First Army, January 17, 1918. Subject: Weekly telegraphic bed reports. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (632.1).

    (35) Memorandum from the chief surgeon, A. E. F., to Col. S. H. Wadhams, M. C., G-4, G. H. Q., A. E. F., September 21, 1918. Subject: Information regarding change of status of hospitals. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (320.23).

    (36) Memorandum from Col. S. H. Wadhams, M. C., to the chief surgeon, A. E. F., September 30, 1918. Subject: Information regarding change of status of hospitals. On file, A. G. O., World War Division, chief surgeon's files (320.23).

    (37) War diaries, chief surgeon's office, November 16, 1918, to June 30, 1919.

    (38) Report of the Medical Department activities of the Third Army (undated), by Col. J. C. Grissinger, M. C.; also, letter from the chief surgeon, A. F. in F., to the commanding general, A. F. in F., December 30, 1919. Subject: Report from July 1 to December 31, 1919. Both on file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

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