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Volume VII

Books and Documents

The MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY IN THE WORLD WAR

VOLUME VII

TRAINING

By

Col. WILLIAM N. BISPHAM, M.C.

PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF

MAJ. GEN. M.W. IRELAND
The Surgeon General

WASHINGTON: U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, 1927.


III

LETTER OF TRANSMISSION

I have the honor to submit herewith Volume VII of the history of the MEDICAL DEPARMENT OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY IN THE WORLD WAR. The volume sumitted is entitled, “TRAINING.”

    M.W. Ireland,
    Major General, the Surgeon General.
    THE SECRETARY OF WAR.


Lieut. Col. FRANK W. WEED, M.C., Editor in Chief
LOY McAFEE A.M., M.D., Assistant Editor in Chief

EDITORIAL BOARD

Col. BAILEY K. ASHFORD, M.C.
Col. FRANK BILLINGS, M.C.
Col. THOMAS BOGGS, M.C.
Col. GEORGE E. BREWER
Col. W. P. CHAMBERLAIN, M.C.
Col. C. F. CRAIG, M.C.
Col. HAVEN EMERSON, M.C.
Brig. Gen. JOHN M. T. FINNEY, M.D.
Col. J. H. FORD, M.C.
Lieut. Col. FIELDING H. GARRISON
Col. H. L. GILCHRIST
Brig. Gen. JEFFERSON R. KEAN, M.D.
Lieut. Col. A. G. LOVE, M.C.
Col. CHARLES LYNCH, M.C.
Col. JAMES F. McKERNON, M.C.
Col. S. J. MORRIS, M.C.
Col. R. T. OLIVER, D.C.
Col. CHARLES R. REYNOLDS, M.C.
Lieut. Col. G. E. DE SCHWEINITZ, M.C.
Col. F. J. SILER, M.C.
Brig. Gen. W. S. THAYER, M.D.
Col. A. D. TUTTLE, M.C.
Col. WILLIAM H. WELCH, M.C.
Col. E. P. WOLFE, M.C.
Lieut. Col. CASEY A. WOOD, M.C.
Col. HANS ZINSSER, M.C.


V

PREFACE

This volume, comprising two sections, deals, in the first section, with the basic and special training which was given the various kinds of personnel making up the Medical Department in the United States, and, in the second section, with training in the American Expeditionary Forces.

Obviously, it is impossible to give herein all the details concerning the various schools. In many instances, as in the case of the special schools for medical officers in the United States, schedules of the courses of instruction have had to suffice.

As regards the work carried on at the Army Sanitary School, A. E. F., much of this was preserved in the form of mimeographed memoranda which had been prepared with the view of having them not only for lecture purposes at the school, but also for disseminating them to those members of the Medical Department, A. E. F., who, by reason of exigencies of the service, could not attend the courses at the school. A selection of these memoranda comprises the appendix to this volume. Many of them originally were illustrated. These illustrations have not been reproduced herein; however, great use has been made of them elsewhere, notably, in the volume on sanitation.

In the compilation of this volume, much assistance was rendered by Maj. William B. Borden, M. C., especially in respect of chapters dealing with training in special schools and with training in the American Expeditionary Forces. For this assistance, grateful acknowledgment is now made.


 VII

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE 

INTRODUCTION 

SECTION I. - IN THE UNITED STATES

CHAPTER I. Plan and development
II. Medical officers’ training camps
     [part 1, pages 17-99]
     [part 1, continued, pages 100-162]
     [part 2, pages 163-213]
     [part 2, pages 213-290]
III. Mobilization and training camp for Medical Department units
IV. Training in divisional camps and in posts
V. Training in hospitals
VI. Special schools
VII. Professional schools in military and nonmilitary institutions
VIII. Miscellaneous schools

SECTION II. - IN THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES

CHAPTER IX. Training project
X. Army Sanitary School
XI. College of medical sciences, American Expeditionary Forces University

APPENDIX
List of documents promulgated by the Army Sanitary School, American Expeditionary Forces
[Ed.--The documents contained in the Appendix provide important information on the development of the U.S. Army Medical Department's support of the American Expeditionary Forces in
France during World War I. However, they have not been included in this document.]


LIST OF PLATES

I. Camp Greenleaf and Camp Forrest, Chickamauga National Park, Ga
II. Medical Officers’ Training Camp, Fort Riley, Kans


LIST OF FIGURES

1. General views of the sanitary field appliances constructed at Medical Officers’ Training Camp, Fort Riley, Kans
2. General views of the sanitary field appliances constructed at Medical Officers’ Training Camp, Fort Riley, Kans
3. Model company kitchen (field)
4. Two-barrel mud range
5. New model kitchen table
6. Underground ice box
7. Fly breeder
8. Ober flytraps
9. Shallow “straddle” trenches for excreta
10. Company sink, showing pole seat
11. Portable latrine seat, for “postholes”
12. Baruch portable latrine
13. Deep trench fly-proof latrine, cross section
14. The Lumsden, Roberts, and Stiles sanitary privy
15. Rock-pit incinerator
16. Trench incinerator for sandy soil
17. Rock pile, cross incinerator
18. Cross trench and hearth circular incinerator
19. Improved Guthrie incinerator
20. Loose brick incinerator
21. Alamo incinerator
22. Reno-Kenon incinerator
23. Multiple shelf incinerator
24. Drying platform for horse manure, before incineration
25. Improvised shower bath for use where water economy is imperative
26. Army Medical School, Washington, D. C. Main building
27. Army Medical School annex. X-ray, physical chemistry, and supply building
28. Army Medical School. Bacteriology classroom
29. Army Medical School. Classroom, X-ray physics
30. Army Medical School. Classroom X-ray technique
31. Army Medical School. Classroom,chemistry
32. Army Medical School. Typhoid vaccine department
33. Army Sanitary School, A. E. F., Langres