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Army Veterinary Service

Special Regulations NO. 70, Regulations Governing the Army Veterinary Service

ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE


 SECTION I

GENERAL PROVISIONS

Administrative zones ............................................................  Paragraphs 1-3

Objects of the Veterinary Corps ........................................... Paragraph 4

Organization of the Veterinary Corps in war 5 ....................... Paragraph 5

Titles of veterinary officers .................................................... Paragraph 6

Duties of veterinary officers (general) .................................... Paragraphs 7-9                  

ADMINISTRATIVE ZONES

1.  In time of war the activities of the Military Establishment embrace—

        (a)  The service of the interior.

        (b)  The service of the theater of operations.

2.  The service of the interior is carried on by:

        (a)  Department commanders.

        (b)  Bureau chiefs, having for this purpose general depots of supply, general hospitals, arsenals, etc.

3.  The service of the theater of operations is carried on by the commander of the field forces. The theater of operations is divided into two zones:

        (a)  The zone of the line of communications.

        (b)  The zone of the advance.

The service of the interior functions both in peace and in war; that of the theater of operations in war only.

OBJECTS OF THE VETERINARY CORPS

 4.  The objects of the Veterinary Corps are to protect the health and preserve the efficiency of the animals In the Army. These objects are to be attained by:

        (a)  Preventing the introduction or extension of communicable disease.

        (b)  Reducing losses from illness or injury by the prompt ap­plication of proper treatment.


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        (c)  Relieving the mobile organizations in the zone of the advance of the sick or injured animals which might impede their movements.

        (d)  Treating in hospitals on lines of communication the animals which can be restored to a serviceable condition.

The Veterinary Corps will also provide for the inspection of meat-producing animals before and after slaughter and of dressed carcasses; and for the inspection of dairy herds supplying milk to the Army.

ORGANIZATION OF THE VETERINARY CORPS IN WAR

5.  The following table gives an outline of the organization of the Veterinary Corps:

Surgeon General: Director of Veterinary Corps

Service of the interior

Theater of operations

Veterinary service in connection with the purchase and transportation of animals and also at remount depots.

Zone of the advance: Veterinary Corps personnel. With mobile organizations.

Mobile veterinary sections.

Veterinary service at posts, in camps, and on the march.

Zone of the line of communications: Advanced base or receiving hospital. Base veterinary hospitals. Veterinary supply divisions in medical supply depots.

Veterinary service at embarkation depots and on transports.

Veterinary supply divisions in medical supply depots.

 
TITLES OF VETERINARY OFFICERS

6. The title of the veterinary officer in immediate charge of the administration of the Veterinary Corps under the Surgeon General is Director of the Veterinary Corps. The title of the senior veterinary officer on the staff of the Commander in Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces is Chief Veterinarian; of an army or a line of communications, Assistant Chief Veterinarian; of an army corps, Corps Veterinarian; of a division, Division Veterinarian; of a brigade operating independently, Brigade Veterinarian; of a post, the Veterinarian; of a detachment, regiment, or smaller command, the Veterinarian; and of a mobile veterinary section, hospital, or other veterinary formation, Veterinarian in Charge.

DUTIES OF VETERINARY OFFICERS (GENERAL)

7. In addition to the duties and responsibilities devolving upon him as a practitioner of veterinary medicine, the veterinary officer has certain other duties and responsibilities. These may


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be classified in two groups—namely: (a) Advisory and (b) administrative. The former includes the duties of the staff officer to his commander; the latter, the duties of an organization or detachment commander to his superiors and to the organization or detachment which he commands.

8.  The duties of a veterinary officer acting in an advisory capacity are, in general, as follows:

        (a)  To keep himself informed of tha condition of the animals of the command and of conditions which may affect their health and efficiency.

        (b)  To communicate to his commander such of this information as has a bearing upon military administration and to make such recommendations as may be deemed advisable to meet existing or anticipated conditions. The information which may be required and the recommendations will include the state of the health and efficiency of the animals of the command, the shoeing, the sanitary condition of the horse lines or stables, the condition of the forage, the water supply, the methods of feeding and watering, stable practices, the disposal of waste matter, disposition of sick and injured animals, and any other matters which may affect the health or efficiency of the animals of the organization.

        (c)  To make prescribed reports and returns and to take such action on the reports and returns of his subordinates as may be required by existing regulations.
        (d)  To perform such other duties as may be required of him by superior authority.

        (e) While veterinary officers acting as technical advisors to their commanders are responsible for pointing out insanitary conditions in connection with the animals of the Army and making proper recommendations for their correction, the direct responsibility rests with the commander. If, however, the commander authorizes the veterinary officer to give orders in his name for the correction of defects, then the duties and responsibilities of the latter are correspondingly increased.

        (f)  Veterinary officers must always remember that when any veterinary necessity of the moment comes in conflict with a purely military necessity the former must be considered as of secondary importance, unless they are convinced that the authority responsible for the military necessity is not aware of the far-reaching results from a veterinary point of view, in which case they may represent the matter to the military authority


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concerned, who alone is in possession of all the facts and who alone can decide.

9. Veterinary officers acting in an administrative capacity are directly responsible for the condition and efficiency of their commands. Their duties are similar in character to those of administrative officers of the line of the Army. More specifically they are charged with the following:

        (a)  The training, discipline, efficiency, and assignment to duty of the personnel which they command and the supervision of the internal economy of their organizations.

        (b)  The maintenance of equipment in proper condition by requisition for supplies needed and by proper care of property on hand.

        (c)  The keeping of the prescribed records and the making of the prescribed reports and returns.

        (d)  The performance of such other duties as may be required of them by superior authority.