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Chapter V

Contents

CHAPTER V

HOSPITALS PROVIDED

HOSPITALS AT NATIONAL ARMY CANTONMENTS

It was contemplated as early as May, 1917, that there would be 32 camps at which the war army would be mobilized.1 Sixteen of these camps were later located in the North and 16 in the South. Generally speaking, those in the South were for National Guard troops, and those in the North were for the National Army. Since there were no modern hospitals of temporary construction, of a size comparable with the ones required for the camps, whose plans could be followed, the provision of hospital facilities for the camps presented a problem of considerable magnitude. The Letterman General Hospital at San Francisco was the nearest approach to the type desired, and the degree of influence it exercised has already been mentioned. As all the hospitals for the moblization camps were to be alike, one plan was designed to serge for all the 32 camps; consequently, it was necessitated that the common plan be adequate and free from serious error lest a mistake be multiplied 32 times.

DELAYED CONSTRUCTION

The preliminary plans which were prepared in the Surgeon General's Office showed the arrangement in each of the hospital buildings and their interrelation as a group. The plans for the hospitals of the National Army camps were forwarded to the Quartermaster General's Office and construction was requested on the following dates: On June 12, 1917, for Camps Devens, Dix, Jackson, and Lewis;2 on June 13, 1917, for Camp Sherman;3 on June 18, 1917, for Camps Upton, Custer, Lee, Meade, and Taylor;4 on June 23, 1917, for Camp Grant;1 on July 5, 1917, for Camps Dodge and Gordon;6 and on July 9, 1917, for Camps Pike and Travis.7

On June 22, 1917, the Quartermaster General acknowledged by letter to the Surgeon General the receipt of the plans for the first 10 camps which had been sent, and stated that the available funds for the construction of buildings at the cantonments were not sufficient to cover the cost of the erection of hospitals.8 Acting promptly on this information, the Surgeon General submitted an estimate to cover the deficiency, and on June 25, 1917, forwarded the letter of the Quartermaster General to the Chief of Staff by an indorsement in which he stated that the deficiency estimate had been made and he requested that the Quartermaster General be authorized, in the emergency, to proceed with construction of the National Army hospitals.9 In passing through The Adjutant General's Office an indorsement was added to the letter in which The Adjutant General requested the Quartermaster General.


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to delay action for a reasonable length of time to determine if possible what the will of Congress might be.10 To this request of The Adjutant General the Quartermaster General replied on July 16, 1917, stating that the time had come when a start must be made in the construction of the hospital part of the cantonments if the whole was to be completed together.11 On the following day The Adjutant General forwarded to the Quartermaster General the instructions and authority of the Secretary of War to proceed with the construction of hospital facilities for 3 per cent of the commands,12 and on July 24 and 26 the necessary plans and instructions were sent to the field by the Cantonment Division of the Quartermaster General's Office. Under this authority of the Secretary of War the construction of the hospitals at the following National Army cantonments was begun: For hospitals of 1,000 beds each at Camps Devens, Dix, Jackson, Lewis, Sherman, Upton, Custer, Lee, Meade, Taylor, Grant, and Travis; and for 500-bed hospitals at Camps Dodge, Gordon, and Pike.

The strengths of troops at the National Army camps, with the dates when the first sick were admitted to hospitals,13 were as follows:  

Camps

First patient received in cantonment hospital

Average number of troops in camps

September 1917

October 1917

Upton

Sept. 1

10,000

29,000

Custer

Sept. 5

8,500

19,000

Devens

Sept. 5

22,000

28,000

Lewis

Sept. 10

19,000

37,500

Taylor

Sept. 13

14,500

23,000

Sherman

Sept. 15

13,000

32,000

Travis

Sept. 21

13,000

27,000

Lee

Sept. 23

12,500

31,000

Pike

Sept. 27

23,000

24,000

Meade

Sept. 28

6,000

17,500

Gordon

Oct. 4

17,000

17,500

Grant

Oct. 14

13,500

28,500

Jackson

Oct. 22

13,000

16,000

Dodge

Oct. 28

16,000

23,000

Dix

Oct. 29

9,000

25,000


ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS

The base hospitals, as originally constructed at the National Army camps, were of pavilion type and all buildings were one-story, nearly all being connected by corridor without steps. Subsequently, 32 wards (all but the isolation and psychiatric wards) were connected by corridor with the administration, receiving and forwarding, laboratory and X-ray, eye, ear, nose and throat, operating, mess and kitchen, and exchange buildings.14 The whole group covered a rectangular area of approximately 1,200 by 1,400 feet, fronting on a long side.14 The wards were placed parallel to each other in four rows of eight wards each, running from front to rear. Between the inner two rows, and from front to rear, were the laboratory and X-ray building, the operating pavilion, the exchange, mess hall and kitchen, in the order given. In front of the center was the administration building and to its right the receiving and forwarding buildings. The nurses' quarters were on one front corner, the officers' ward on the other; the isolation and psychiatric wards on one rear


104

corner, and the quarters for the enlisted personnel on the other. To the rear of the latter two were the utilities and the storage buildings. The officers' quarters were in front, but across the street and facing the hospital. All buildings were of frame; but all had modern equipment and fixtures, plumbing and sewerage, steam heating, cooking, and sterilizing.

There were originally about 60 or 70 buildings in each National Army base hospital group. Subsequent conditions necessitated augmenting this number to 80 or 90 and in some instances even to 100.15

FIG. 57.-Block plan of base hospitals as originally constructed

The corridors connecting the buildings were 10 feet wide and in northern cantonments were inclosed. This corridor width was not essential to normal uses, but it was so constructed for expansion space for personnel and convalescents. There was a mile of linear corridor space in the hospital, so constructed as to eliminate the necessity for steps up or down into any building.14

The administration building (B) soon proved to be too small at most places, mainly because administrative requirements had increased and extra administrative staffs had been instituted for training for other base and evacuation hospitals.16 It was also found more advantageous to have the dispensary located in the receiving building. This was done in later construction work, thereby necessitating an increase in floor space.17 The labor-  


105

atory and X-ray building (F) soon became inadequate in size at all the large camps;16 and it was enlarged to make possible the growing scope of work, not only in connection with the hospital, but with that in the nature of public health control in the military communities.18

FIG. 58.-Inclosed corridor, connecting buildings

The surgical pavilion (G) was enlarged at all the large camps.19 The necessity for this was occasioned largely by the acceptance of men for service who had disabilities considered removable by surgical procedures.

FIG. 59.-Typical one-story ward of temporary construction

The refrigerating area and the mess hall were enlarged in the larger hospitals; and the diet kitchen, in newer designs, was placed nearer the passage, to be of easier access to food conveyances.20

The single ward (K-1) and the double ward (L-1) were the wards which cared for the great majority of the sick.21 The former predominated in number  


106

and size. Little change was made in these wards during the war except to increase the number of quiet rooms, to provide more doors giving access to the porch, and to bring the utility room nearer to the ward proper.22 The con­

FIG. 60.-Portion of the isolation section of a base hospital

struction of the double ward (L-1), with common toilet and interior connection, provided because of economy in plumbing at all the camp base hospitals, was discontinued, due to the many objections incident to a detached common

FIG. 61.-Portion of the psychiatric ward

toilet area not under close observation. The isolation ward (M) was commonly used at the first camps. It was changed in later construction to provide smaller and a greater number of isolation rooms and to allow varied, and greater  


107

separation of, food and utensil service.23 Little, if any, change was made in the original plan for the psychiatric ward (R-2).

The two-story ward barrack building was developed and used in the enlargement of the hospitals of the National Army early in 1918.24 The interior arrangement provided four wards, two on each floor, each with a toilet room and two small rooms. On each floor, in the center of the building and between the wards, was a common day room. The plan was to have these ward barracks located as near to the hospital group as possible, to enhance their availability and to reduce the distance between them and the central mess and kitchen.25 At some hospitals, however, the mistaken impression was gained that these buildings were to constitute a separate convalescent hospital and that a separate mess and kitchen would be built for the group.26 As a result, at some cantonments, they were located at a distance from the hospital proper and laid out as a separate colony rather than as an integral part of the hospital.27

FIG. 62.-Exterior of a typical ward barrack

In addition to the provision of hospitals the appropriation for construction and repair of hospitals provided certain buildings in the camp proper.28 A regimental infirmary was built for each regiment in every cantonment.28 The purpose of the regimental infirmary was to afford housing for the Medical Department enlisted personnel of the regiment and space for offices, for physical examinations, for out-patient treatment, and a dispensary. It was not intended that sick be given hospital care here. However, in the early period of the camps, when the hospital facilities were not quite sufficient to cope with the large number of sick from the raw troops in training,16 these infirmaries, in addition to being used as it was originally intended they should be, were also extensively used at the cantonments for the hospital care of the sick.30 One dental infirmary was built for each National Army cantonment and was located centrally in the camp area.31 In towns or cities adjacent to the cantonments, or at the cantonments, early treatment stations were provided for the administration of venereal prophylactic treatment. The stations varied in number, and were either constructed or, as was usually the case, provided in  


108

existent buildings.32 In the early period of the camps, when the hospital facilities were not quite sufficient to cope with the large number of sick from the raw troops in training,16 these infirmaries, in addition to serving the num­

FIG 63

bers for which they were built, were extensively used at the cantonments for the sick requiring treatments.30

HOSPITALS AT NATIONAL GUARD CAMPS

HOSPITALS NOT INCLUDED IN PRELIMINARY PLANS

On May 29, 1917, when the Chief of Staff directed that the National Army cantonments be built, he stated that the National Guard housing would be made the subject of a subsequent communication.33 On July 13, 1917, instructions were issued to the Quartermaster General to proceed with the construction of 16 camps for the National Guard, 6 to be ready for occupancy August 1, 6 August 15, and the remainder September 1.34

No early provision was made for the construction of hospitals at the National Guard camps.35 The Surgeon General, therefore, requested The Adjutant General, on June 28, 1917, to reserve adequate tentage for tent hospitals for the National Guard camps.35 Because of the fact that no tentage was available in the Quartermaster Department,36 it was directed that the tentage stored in the field medical supply depots be used.37 This Medical Department tentage was a part of the equipment of sanitary units, namely, department hospitals, field hospitals, etc., equipment which had been slowly acquired after years of planning and effort and which would soon be needed in actual service at the front.38 The tentage referred to was insufficient for the 16 National Guard camps,38 and for this reason, as well as the disinclination to divert its use, reconsideration of the instructions was urgently requested and further representation was made by the Surgeon General that there be proper provision to shelter the sick at the camps.38 A period of inactivity followed,  


109

and at the end of a month the Surgeon General stated that the question of adequate hospital provision had been delayed to the point of danger and requested the Chief of Staff to authorize the construction of frame hospitals and infirmaries for the National Guard troops.39 On July 26, 1917, the Secretary of War authorized the construction of temporary hospitals for the National Guard.39 Anticipating the probability of this authorization, the Surgeon General, on July 17, 1917, had provided the Quartermaster General with preliminary plans and form letters, for each camp, requesting construction.40      The War Department authority provided for the construction of hospital facilities for 3 per cent of the original personnel allotted to each camp.41 The authorized number of hospital beds for each National Guard camp, the average strength of the commands at the camps for the first two months, and the coincident degree of hospital completion, were as follows:13  

Camps

Number of beds originally authorized

Per cent completed-

 

First sick received in new camp hospital

Average strength of command for first two months after opening

Sept. 15.

Oct. 15.

September

October

Beauregard

500

25

80

Oct. 14, 1917

4,500

7,500

Bowie

800

54

99

Aug. 22, 1917

15,000

31,000

Cody

800

40

99

Sept 1, 1917

12,000

22,000

Doniphan

800

25

66

----

a12,000

b23,000

Fremont

500

10

50

Jan. 4, 1918

a7,500

b11,000

Greene

1,000

52

95

Sept. 17, 1917

38,500

41,000

Hancock

800

20

75

Oct. 14, 1917

27,000

28,000

Kearny

500

10

50

Sept. 1, 1917 

5,000

15,500

Logan

500

10

100

Sept. 15, 1917

14,500

22,500

MacArthur

800

95

98

Sept. 12, 1917

5,500

27,500

McClellan

1,000

35

90

Sept. 27, 1917

15,000

24,000

Sevier

500

25

95

Sept. 21, 1917

12,000

23,500

Shelby

500

83

100

Sept. 26, 1917

16,000

23,000

Sheridan

800

20

50

Oct. 9, 1917

16,000

21,000

Wadsworth

1,000

77

90

Oct. 8, 1917

22,500

31,000

Wheeler

500

10

25

Oct. 17, 1917

5,000

23,000

    aJanuary, 1918.                            bFebruary, 1918.

ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS

The hospitals as originally authorized for the National Guard camps were similar to those for the National Army cantonments. The block plan was exactly the same.14 The important differences were that central heating, steam cooking, plumbing, sewerage, and interior lighting and ceiling, were not authorized.45 These necessities, except central heating, were authorized by the Secretary of War in October and December, 1917, and the work of installation proceeded as rapidly as possible.42 They were not authorized earlier because of the intention to evacuate the troops from these camps before cold weather. The lack of these necessities was sorely felt in the hospitals in the early months of their operation.16

After the hospitals had been completed, various additions and improvements were made from time to time. The most important of these was the addition of ward barracks, varying in number at the different camps to allow for from 250 to 500 additional patients, depending; upon the total strength of the camp commands.

As in the National Army cantonments, the original hospitals, built at the authorized bed capacity of 3 per cent, were too small.43 Additional quarters  


110

for personnel, improvements in cooking and lighting facilities, and additions to laboratory, receiving and operating buildings, were a few of the many important items of subsequent additional construction.44

Regimental infirmaries similar to those in the National Army cantonments were provided the National Guard camps, one to each regiment, and here, even more than with the National Army troops, these buildings, in addition to their regimental work, were used extensively until conditions were settled in the hospitals.30

Two dental infirmaries were constructed at each camp and located centrally, to make them readily accessible to the training troops.51

GENERAL HOSPITALS

Four general hospitals functioned as a part of the Army in the United States prior to April, 1917. The capacity of each of these hospitals, with the exception of that of Hot Springs, Ark., was markedly expanded by the provision of temporary construction from time to time. In this temporary construction, as was the case with each general hospital constructed, the projects were individual in character and for that reason the subject of additions and improvements will be considered subsequently in the discussion of separate general hospital histories.

PORT HOSPITALS

Two ports were used for embarkation and debarkation:45 One at Hoboken, N. J., the other at Newport News, Va. The debarkation of sick and wounded was provided for at both places.46

The sick and wounded concerned were divided into two principal classes, those from embarking troops and those returned sick or wounded from overseas. It was anticipated that the first class would have to be cared for as soon as embarkation began; the home care of the second class was not viewed as a problem demanding early solution.43

The following hospitals were provided at the ports during the war: At Hoboken, N. J.: General Hospital No. 1, Williamsbridge, New York City (a port hospital part of the time); Base Hospital, Camp Merritt, Tenafly, N. J.; Base Hospital, Camp Mills, Long Island, N. Y.; Auxiliary Hospital No. 1, New York City; Embarkation Hospital No. 1 (formerly St. Mary's Hospital), Hoboken, N. J.; Embarkation Hospital No. 2, Secaucus, N. J.; Embarkation Hospital No. 3, Hoffman Island, N. Y.; Embarkation Hospital No. 4, (formerly Polyclinic Hospital), New York City; Debarkation Hospital No. 2, Fox Hills, Staten Island (was General Hospital No. 41 part of the time); Debarkation Hospital No. 3 (formerly Greenhut Building), New York City; Debarkation Hospital No. 4 (formerly Nassau Hotel), Long Beach, Long Island (was General Hospital No. 39 part of the time); Debarkation Hospital No. 5 (formerly Grand Central Palace Building), New York City. At Newport News, Va.: Embarkation Hospital, Camp Stewart, Newport News, Va.; Debarkation Hospital No. 51 (formerly Soldiers' Home), Hampton, Va. (was General Hospital No. 43 part of the time); Debarkation Hospital No. 52, (formerly General Hospital No. 22,


111

Richmond College), Richmond, Va. All of these hospitals were not in use at the same time; the majority of them, however, were in use simultaneously late in the war period. The hospital at Camp Merritt and the embarkation hospitals were provided first and were used to care for the sick developing at the ports, particularly among troops encamped and awaiting transport. With the exception of Debarkation Hospital No. 1, which was procured early, the debarkation hospitals were developed later to receive the sick and wounded from abroad.

Figure 152 (p. 426) shows the available beds and the number of beds occupied in the embarkation and debarkation hospitals at Hoboken and Newport News. 

As was the case with the general hospitals provided, the plans for embarkation and debarkation hospitals differed materially one from the other and will be given further consideration in the discussion of the separate hospital histories.

MISCELLANEOUS HOSPITALS

Many hospitals were constructed, exclusive of general, camp, base, and port hospitals. As they do not fall conveniently into a simple classification, they have been grouped as miscellaneous hospitals. These varied greatly in size. Some were larger than many of the general hospitals; others were quite small; some were really infirmaries, provided for emergency work only; a few consisted merely of room primarily intended for other purposes. They were constructed at various times during the war; therefore, some represent early work, others the most recent and best hospital construction work that was done. Many were necessitated because of the establishment of separate camps of instruction apart from other camps, cantonments, or posts. Large storage depots, shell-filling plants, temporary arsenals, proving grounds, chemical experiment stations, port terminals, and a host of other large special military activities required hospital or infirmary construction. Of these miscellaneous hospitals, eight were more important than the others, at least in point of size. These were: Base Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Tex.; Base Hospital, Fort Riley Kans., which served as a base hospital for the National Army troops at Camp Funston; Camp Hospital, Camp Joseph E. Johnston, Jacksonville, Fla.; Camp Hospital, Edgewood Arsenal, Edgewood, Md.; Camp Hospital, Camp Abraham Eustis, Lee Hall, Va.; Camp Hospital, Camp Humphreys, Accotink, Va.; Camp Hospital, Camp Knox, West Point, Ky.; and Camp Hospital, Camp Bragg, Fayetteville, N. C.

At the following places there were hospital facilities, the bed capacity of none exceeding 200:13

Raritan Arsenal, Metuchen, N. J., 200-bed hospital.
Norfolk Terminal, Norfolk, Va., 150-bed hospital. 
Camp Forest, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., infirmary.
Camp Glenburne, Glenburne, Md., infirmary. 
Camp Benning, Columbus, Ga., infirmary.
Camp Perry, Port Clinton, Ohio, small hospital.
Camp Crane, Allentown, Pa., small hospital.
Camp Greenleaf, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., infirmary.
Camp Holabird, Baltimore, Md., small hospital.
Camp Jessup, Fort McPherson, Ga., infirmary.
Camp Normoyle, San Antonio, Tex., infirmary.


112

Camp Meigs, Washington, D. C., infirmary.
Disciplinary Barracks, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., small permanent hospital. 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Md., emergency hospital.
Port Newark Terminal, Newark, N. J., infirmary.
Ordnance Depot, Middletown, Pa., infirmary.
Ordnance Depot, New Cumberland, Pa., infirmary.
Supply Base, Fort Wood, N. Y., infirmary.
Storage Depot, Chicago, Ill., infirmary
Storage Depot, Columbus, Ohio, infirmary.
Storage Depot, Jeffersonville, Ind., infirmary.
Storage Depot, New Cumberland, Pa., infirmary.
Storage Depot, Pittsburgh, Pa., infirmary.
Storage Depot, Schenectady, N. Y., infirmary. 
Storage Depot, St. Louis, Mo., infirmary.  
Picric Acid Plant, Little Rock, Ark., infirmary. 
Supply Base, Brooklyn, N. Y., infirmary. 
Tank Corps Camp, Asheville, N. C., infirmary.
Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, N. Y., infirmary. 
Camp Colt, Gettysburg, Pa., infirmary. 
Lakehurst Proving Ground, N. J., infirmary. 
Camp Alexander, Newport News, Va., infirmary. 
Delaware General Supply Ordnance Depot, Pedricktown, N. J., infirmary. 
Camp Syracuse, N. Y., infirmary.  
Camp Willoughby, Ohio, infirmary.

HOSPITAL BEDS AVAILABLE ON ARMISTICE DAY

On November 11, 1918, there were in the United States, excluding hospitals of small size and the camp hospitals, 92 large hospitals with a combined bed capacity of 120,916, and additions authorized, or under construction, which would have furnished a total capacity of 147,636 beds. This represented 89 new hospitals which had been opened, many completely constructed.47

In addition to the hospitals already in operation, projects were under way, buildings had been leased, and work begun which would have made available approximately 60,000 more beds in Army hospitals in the United States. Two procurement boards were in the field with a long list of cities to be visited for the purpose of obtaining more hospitals.  


113 

TABLE 7.-Hospital beds available on Armistice Day47


114     

REFERENCES

(1) Memorandum from Chief, War College Division, General Staff, to the Chief of Staff, May 4, 1917. Subject: Cantonments for National Guard and additional forces. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2593945 (Old Files).

(2) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, June 12, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).

(3) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, June 13, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).

(4) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, June 18, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).

(5) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, June 23, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).

(6) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, July 5, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospital. On file., Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).

(7) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, July 10, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).  


115

(8) Letter from officer in charge cantonment construction, to the Surgeon General, June 22, 1917. Subject: Estimate for construction of hospitals at cantonments for the National Army. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2637479 (Old Files).

(9) First indorsement from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, June 25, 1917. Subject: Cantonment hospitals. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2637479 (Old Files). 

(10) Second indorsement from The Adjutant General to the officer in charge, cantonment construction, June 28, 1917. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2637479 (Old Files). 

(11) Third indorsement from Quartermaster General to Chief of Staff, July 16, 1917. Subject: Hospital construction, National Army cantonments.  On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 632.

(12) Fourth indorsement from The Adjutant General to officer in charge, cantonment construction, July 17, 1917. Subject: Approval. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 632. (U).

(13) Compiled from bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(14) Shown on block plans of base hospitals. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(15) Shown in construction requests, hospitals concerned. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. 

(16) Extracts from reports of sanitary inspectors made during the World War. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721-1.

(17) Plan J-3. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(18) Memorandum from Major Voorhees, Sanitary Corps, S. G. O., to Capt. J. H. Clark, construction division, W. D., September 25, 1918. Subject: Addition to X-ray laboratory. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 Lab. (General).

(19) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, for the officer in charge of cantonment construction, December 15, 1917. Subject: Operative building for eye, ear, nose, etc. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (General).

(20) Letter from the Chief of Construction Division to the Surgeon General, September 6, 1918. Subject: Allotment of refrigeration at base hospitals. On file, Hospital Division (National Army, General File, Misc.). Plans of kitchen and mess halls. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(21) Plan K-25. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(22) Shown on plans of different hospital wards. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(23) Shown on plans of isolation wards (M-1). On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(24) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, December 26, 1917. Subject: Hospital records at National Army and National Guard base hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632-11 (General).

(25) Telegram from the Surgeon General to commanding officer, National Army and National Guard hospitals, March 8, 1918. Subject: Location of two-story ward barracks. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (National Army General File). Two-story ward barracks.

(26) Letter from the commanding officer, Base Hospital, Camp Dodge, Iowa, to the Surgeon General, May 8, 1918. Subject: Change in two-story wards. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Camp Dodge) B.

(27) Telegram from the commanding officer, Base Hospital, Camp Custer, Mich., to the Surgeon General, March 9, 1918. Subject: Location of two-story ward barracks. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Camp Custer) D. Telegram from commanding officer, Base Hospital, Camp Gordon, to the Surgeon General, March 9, 1918. Subject: Location of two-story ward barracks. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Camp Gordon) D.

(28) Letter from the Surgeon General to the chairman, Military Committee, House of Representatives, Washington, D. C., May 22, 1918. Subject: Appropriation for construction and repair of hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(29) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, May 26, 1917. Subject: Regimental infirmary. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796-R (Old Files).

(30) Reports from division surgeons to the Surgeon General, various dates. Subject: Regimental infirmaries. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (National Army General File), Regimental Infirmaries.

(31) First indorsement from hospital division, S. G. O., to Finance and Supply Division, S. G. O., April 6, 1918. Subject: Dental infirmaries. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Dental Infirmaries).  


116

(32) Weekly report from section of venereal diseases, Division of Infectious Diseases, to the Surgeon General, October 13, 1917. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., Weekly Report File (Venereal Control).

(33) Telegram from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, each department, May 29, 1917. Subject: Construction of cantonments for National Army and National Guard. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2613846 (Old Files Section).

(34) Memoranda from the Chief of Staff to The Adjutant General, July 13, 1917. Subject: Construction work at National Guard divisional training camps. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 354.1 (Misc. Sec.).

(35) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, June 28, 1917. Subject: Tentage for base hospitals for camps of militia. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174959-B (Old Files). 

(36) Second indorsement from Quartermaster General to The Adjutant General, July 2, 1917. Subject: Tentage. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174959-B (Old Files).

(37) Third indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, July 6, 1917. Subject: Tentage. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174959-B (Old Files).

(38) Fourth indorsement from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, July 12, 1917. Subject: Tentage. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174959-B (Old Files).

(39) Ninth indorsement from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, July 25, 1917. Subject: Authority to construct wood hospitals and infirmaries for National Guard camps. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174959 (Old Files).

(40) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, July 17, 1917. Subject: Hospitals for National Guard camps. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174959-B (Old Files).

(41) Memorandum from Chief of War College Division to Chief of Staff, May 29, 1917. Subject: Cantonment construction program. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 175339-c-1 (Old Files). 

(42) First indorsement, Cantonment Division, W. D., to Surgeon General, November 5, 1917. Subject: Plumbing, sewer, lining, and ceiling of National Guard camp base hospitals. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (National Guard General Files, Plumbing Facilities). Letter from Engineering Branch, W. D., to Surgeon General, April 4, 1918. Subject: Assistant Secretary of War's approval of installation of steam cooking for National Guard camp hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(43) Memoranda from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, April 2, 1918. Subject: Hospitalization in the United States. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(44) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Construction Division, W. D., June 18, 1919. Subject: Record of authorization of funds. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632-1 (General).

(45) First indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, July 16, 1917. Subject: Ports of embarkation. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 188699-A (Old Files).

(46) Letter from surgeon, port of embarkation, to the Surgeon General, January 8, 1918. Subject: Hospital facilities. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Newport News, Va.) N. Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, January 31, 1918.  Subject: Accommodations for troops and other casuals returning from Europe. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Hoboken, N. J.) N.

(47) Weekly bed report, Hospital Division, S. G. O., for week ending November 11, 1918.  

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