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Chapter XXVIII

Contents

CHAPTER XXVIII

GENERAL HOSPITALS, NOS. 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, AND 40

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 30, PLATTSBURG BARRACKS, N. Y.

Plattsburg Barracks is located on the west shore of the northern portion of Lake Champlain, and within 1 mile of the city of Plattsburg.

The plan and distribution of its buildings was that of a typical Army regimental post; there was a large parade with the officers' quarters along one side, facing the lake, the hospital and barracks in continuation along another, with the administration building at the southwest corner.

The country along the lake front, north and south of the post, and for 15 miles west to the foothills of the Adirondacks, forms a lowland sloping gently toward the lake. The soil is uniformly sandy, affording good drainage and freedom from dust and mud. The roads throughout the reservation were of macadam and were connected with the well-maintained roads of the State; the New York-Albany-Montreal highway passed just without the gates.

The Surgeon General desired to use this post for general hospital purposes, for in addition to the permanent post buildings, 35 temporary barracks had been added from time to time for the training camps which had been conducted at this station. In June, 1917,1 authority of the War Department was given to use the permanent buildings of the post; but, not unlike Fort Benjamin Harrison, Fort Des Moines, Fort Sheridan, and others, the buildings, being used for other purposes, were acquired very slowly.

During the summer, fall, and winter of 1917 the hospital operated as a post hospital; but in the spring and summer of 1918 additional space became available, and some alteration and renovation, to adapt the buildings for hospital purposes, were authorized.

The question of the establishment of a general hospital was again brought up and authority was given to use certain additional temporary buildings;2 but they were not then made available, because of the local activities requiring their use.

On September 21, 1918, the Secretary of War designated this station as General Hospital No. 30.3 Prior to this time, the Surgeon General had requested (in April, in August, and on September 16 and 20) a total of over $200,000 for alterations and repair work necessary for the adaptation of the post to general hospital purposes.4 The work called for in April was completed in September, and part of that called for in August and September was finished in February and March; but a portion of the work was never completed, as construction and alteration were discontinued in March, 1919. A maximum capacity of 1,200 beds had been provided, including reconstruction facilities and all activities essential to general hospital work. The total cost was $225,000.


587

In the fall of 1918 it became imperative to send mental and nervous cases and epileptics to this hospital for treatment.5 Though unsatisfactory, the facilities for their treatment were better there than elsewhere. So long as troops were kept at this place for training it was impossible to prevent intermingling of the ordinary sick with the mental cases; and this condition, though relatively temporary, was unavoidable. The department inspector recommended that a decision be reached by the War Department as to the future of this post; that it be used either as a general hospital with no other activities to interfere, or, that another location be selected for the treatment of mental cases; and that construction and alterations already requested, looking to a betterment for the winter, be expedited.6

Opening as a general hospital in September, 1918, with a capacity of approximately 800 and with 400 sick, the activity of the hospital greatly increased and the number of sick rose during the fall and early winter of this year, reaching over 900. In February a decline began, continuing until May, 1919, when the number of sick fell to 513.7 Much of this decline was due to the fact that better provisions were being made elsewhere for mental cases. After May, 1919, no more patients of this class were sent to this hospital, which was reorganized in that month for general medical and surgical cases only. Its activity now increased; and by June, about 1,000 medical and surgical cases were being treated. However, the final decline began at this point and continued until the closing of the hospital. On September 3, 1919,8 when the sick had dropped below 700, its discontinuance was recommended to take effect September 30.

When the hospital closed on October 10 the remaining sick were sent by hospital train to General Hospital No. 41, Fox Hills, N. Y.9

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 30, Plattsburg Barracks, N. Y., from September, 1918, to October 10, 1919, inclusive


588

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 31, CARLISLE, PA.

Carlisle Barracks was one of the oldest military posts in existence in the United States, having been established sometime prior to the Revolutionary War. It was garrisoned during the Revolution and at times was used as a prison for British prisoners. The barracks were built in 1777, chiefly by Hessian prisoners. The barracks were built in 1777, chiefly by Hessian prisoners. They were occupied during the War of 1812. In 1863, all but one or two buildings were burned by the Confederates on the night of July 1, just before the Battle of Gettysburg. Between 1865 and 1870 the barracks were rebuilt and occupied as a Cavalry school. Subsequent to this time Indian prisoners were kept there, then later it became a school for Indian prisoners, and still later it became the Carlisle Indian School. 

On July 9, 1918, the Secretary of War requested the Secretary of the Interior to approve the turning back of Carlisle Barracks to the War Department, citing the need by the Army of an institution of this character for the rehabilitation and reeducation of sick and wounded, to which the Secretary of the Interior agreed on July 16.10

Carlisle Barracks was situated on the outskirts of the town of Carlisle, in the beautiful Cumberland Valley, 19 miles west of Harrisburg, with which city there were train, trolley, and excellent road connections. The institutions, as transferred from the Department of the Interior, consisted of 308 acres of excellent farm land and 50 buildings. Farm No. 1, adjoining the campus, or main site, on the north and east, contained 110 acres. Farm No. 2, about three-fourths of a mile distant, contained 175 acres. The school section comprised 23 acres and 41 buildings, the latter consisting of barracks, quarters, administrative and school buildings, storehouses, power plant, etc.11


589

FIG. 187


590

A rapid survey of the buildings, which were old, was made by representatives of the Construction Division and the Surgeon General's Office, to determine repairs and alterations necessary to restore them to properly care for the sick. It was estimated that $180,000 would be required to do this work and that 800 sick could be accommodated.12

In the meantime, negotiations had been initiated with the Department of the Interior to effect the transfer of the real estate and a portion of the school equipment. The continuation of a lease of a 40-acre tract of land which was necessary for the operation of this property was also secured.

Funds necessary for the conversion were requested on August 31 and were allotted on October 2. The major portion of this money was required for under the headings of carpentry, masonry and repair work, plumbing and heating, repairing, and fire protection. This work was completed in March, 1919. Some other miscellaneous improvements were found necessary, which increased the total cost of this project to $194,000 and produced a maximum capacity of 900 beds.

On August 15, 1918, it was recommended that the designation, General Hospital No. 31, be given. This was approved in the following month.13 

Although the alteration work was not completed until March, 1919, some local sick were treated from the very beginning when the hospital was opened, in October, 1918. The capacity of the hospital reached 500 in February, 1919, and by this time about 380 sick were under treatment. In another month the capacity rose to 800 and the number of patients to 650. By the following August the maximum capacity of 900 was reached, though at that time there were 919 sick in the hospital. Throughout the period from August, 1919, to the end of the year the number of sick gradually diminished.14

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 31, Carlisle, Pa., from September 21, 1918, to December, 1919, inclusive


591

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 32, CHICAGO, ILL.

The property acquired for General Hospital No. 32 was located southeast of the center of Chicago, near the lake, and at the corner of Drexel Boulevard and East Forty-seventh Street. It consisted of the Cooper-Monatah Hotel, leased at $52,500 per year, and the Stillman Apartments, leased at $3,000 per year. Near-by residences, which were covered by nominal leases at $1 per year, were secured and used as nurses' quarters.15

This group was one of the first secured for hospital purposes under the new authority, dated September 21, 1918, from the Secretary of War, empowering a board constituted by a representative from the General Staff, the Construction Division, and the Surgeon General's Office to select properties for hospital purposes, to approve the lease, and to authorize the expenditure of funds. The Cooper-Monatah Hotel was leased in October, 1918;16, and it was desired to alter the building and occupy it by December 1; but, due to delay in securing definite approval-an approval which had now become unnecessary-the date of completion and occupancy was deferred until January 7, 1919. The board, or hospital commission as it was called, estimated the capacity of the hotel as a hospital at 625 beds.16 As completed, the actual capacity was 530.15  The lease included, in addition to the rental, a fixed sum of $92,980 for the altera-


592

tion work and $24,042 for the restoration of the property after the termination of the lease.16

This building, which was then under construction, was an L-shaped, six­story, mezzanine and basement structure of reinforced concrete floors. The exterior walls were of brick, trimmed with limestone and terra cotta. When it was leased, all walls and floors were in place, the exterior had been finished and the interior partitions installed to and including the fourth floor. No finished floors, plastering or decorating had been started, and no plumbing, heating, or lighting had been installed.

The conversion of this hotel was accomplished in the following manner:17 Complete alteration plans were hurriedly prepared, utilizing the existing structure as far as possible, changing it only where it was necessary to do so, and finishing the incomplete work to best suit the needs of a hospital. Since the

FIG. 188.-General Hospital No. 32, Chicago, Ill.

fifth and sixth floor partitions were not in place, it was possible to provide comparatively large wards on these floors-70 to 80 bed capacity. The remainder of the building, with the exception of the mezzanine floor and a portion of the first floor, being already subdivided into rooms, was allowed to remain so, each room accommodating two to five beds. The basement was arranged so as to provide for the cafeteria, the pharmacy, kitchens, storerooms, etc. The original plans contemplated a capacity of 642 beds. It was necessary, however, to provide additional storage space on the first floor and to install eye, ear, nose, throat and dental facilities on the fourth floor, and these installations reduced the bed capacity to 531. On the first floor, with little alteration, were installed the receiving department, the offices, the laboratory, the mortuary, and the quartermaster storerooms. On the mezzanine floor two large wards and treatment rooms were installed. The second and third floors, containing about 40 rooms each, were allowed to remain subdivided as originally intended for the hotel. These rooms had adjoining baths and were converted into small  


593

wards with two to four beds each, and some of them were fitted up for ward offices, serving pantries, utility rooms and treatment rooms. The isolation section was installed in a portion of the east wing of the second floor. The fifth floor was subdivided into small wards accommodating from 5 to 14 beds each, with the necessary utility and treatment rooms. On the sixth floor were installed a 45-bed and a 75-bed ward, with the necessary ward facilities adjoining. Here also were installed the X-ray and the operating departments. The alteration work was completed January 7, 1919, at a total cost of $108,000.

This hospital was designated "General Hospital No. 32" on December 5, 1918;18 and it treated general medical and surgical cases. It opened with a capacity of 500 beds on January 7,19 the day it was completed, the assembling of the personnel and the organization of the hospital having been accomplished in the meantime; and February 7, 425 sick were being cared for.20 From this day until May 24, 1919, the sick constantly under treatment averaged 450.20 Subsequent to May 24 a rapid reduction in the number of cases treated occurred;20 transfers of sick to this hospital were then withheld and transfers of sick from it, incident to the closing period, were authorized.

On April 15, 1919,21 the Surgeon General recommended its abandonment, to be effective August 1, 1919. This recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War on May 5, 1919.22 Later, May 12,23 the Surgeon General was advised that the United States Public Health Service desired the hospital upon its evacuation by the Army, and, therefore, new arrangements were made and the property was transferred to that service June 15, 1919.24 Prior to this date the remaining sick, requiring further treatment, were sent to General Hospital No. 28, Fort Sheridan, Ill.

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 32, Chicago, Ill., from December 4, 1918, to June 15, 1919, inclusive


594

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 33, FORT LOGAN H. ROOTS, ARK.

Fort Logan H. Roots, on the north bank of the Arkansas River, 3 miles from the town of Little Rock, was situated on an elevation known as Big Rock Mountain. The post was first occupied in 1896 and last garrisoned by Regular troops in 1913, a battalion of the Ninth Infantry being then stationed there. From May to September, 1917, it was used for a citizens' training camp, and from October to November, 1917, the First and Second Regiments of the Arkansas National Guard were encamped on the reservation.25

The general hospital, which was finally established at Fort Logan H. Roots, had its beginning as early as May, 1917, when request was made by the Surgeon General to place the permanent barracks at the disposal of the Medical Department for general and base hospital purposes.26 This request was repeated in May, and again in June; and on June 23, the Secretary of War directed the department commander concerned to turn over to the Medical Department as many barracks as might be needed for base and general hospital use.27 In conformity with this order, the Surgeon General directed the department surgeon to have the post surgeon develop the base hospital at this station and to wire for authority for the construction of any necessary buildings.28 In short, the early history of this hospital is much the same as that of the general hospitals established at Fort Sheridan, Fort Benjamin Harrison, and others, except that the permanent buildings were made available to the Medical Department about a year earlier.

In November, 1917, personnel for a larger hospital was sent to this station and instructions were given outlining the construction work to be done locally. The permanent buildings of this battalion post utilized by the Medical Department consisted chiefly of 12 sets of officers' quarters, a large bachelor officers' building with kitchen and mess hall, 4 company barracks, the post hospital, the post administration building, the post exchange, storehouses, stables, shops, etc.25 In addition, thereto, and immediately adjoining, were 30 temporary company barracks with mess halls, kitchens, etc.25 The post hospital had been enlarged in May, 1917, by the addition of four temporary buildings, and by a fifth building in August of that year.

In December, 1917, in conformity with the post surgeon's request, funds were approved for the renovation and alteration of the permanent buildings  


595

principally, but in part also the temporary buildings of the post, to prepare them for use for general hospital purposes.29 This work was begun and carried on through the following winter and spring and was completed about the middle of the summer of 1918.

On January 11, 1918, the Surgeon General recommended that this hospital be designated a general hospital.30 It was increasing in size, and with the alterations then under way gave promise of a satisfactory development, and was not only caring for the sick of the immediate command but for many sick from Camp Pike as well. There was need for more general hospital space, space which would be under the control of the War Department and which could be manipulated, officered, and administered from central control. There is no record of any action or further recommendation in the above matter until October 1, 1918, when Fort Logan H. Roots was designated "General Hospital No. 33."31

From the beginning of 1918 until October of that year between 200 and 500 sick were constantly in hospital; and then in October, after its designation as a general hospital made it available for general use, many cases were sent there for treatment, the number rising in that month to 784.32 This soon fell, however, and from December, 1918, until its discontinuance as a general hospital in January, 1919, the sick remained below 500.32 On February 24, 1919, the hospital was discontinued as a general hospital and it reverted to a post hospital status.33

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 33, Fort Logan H. Roots, Ark., from October, 1918, to January, 1919, inclusive


596

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 34, EAST NORFOLK, MASS.

The Norfolk State Hospital, Massachusetts, was offered to the Government for use as an Army hospital in August, 1918.34 There followed correspondence between the Surgeon General's Office and the superintendent of the institution.

FIG. 189.-Portion of General Hospital No. 34, East Norfolk, Mass.

Then, in October, 1918,35 the place was surveyed by a board of officers composed of representatives from the Construction Division, the Real Estate Service, and the Surgeon General's Office. This board reported favorably upon the potential qualities of the institution as a military hospital, and a lease was executed, effective October 1, 1918, and until the close of that fiscal year, at an annual rental rate of $1.36

The hospital was situated at East Norfolk, 20 miles southwest of Boston, having been established by the State of Massachusetts in 1910 as an institution for the care and treatment of inebriates and drug addicts. It consisted of two groups of buildings 2 miles apart, the south group comprising 6 cottages, 2 hospital buildings, a mess hall, an administration building, a powerhouse, a laundry service building, industrial shops and a garage; and the north group, which consisted of 6 cottages and an assembly building in which there was a mess hall and kitchen. One quarter mile distant from the north group were a dairy farmhouse and barns for horses.35


597

The institution was equipped with hydrotherapeutic and electrotherapeutic apparatus and with shops for occupational therapy. Its water supply, sewage­disposal plant, and electric light and power plant were very satisfactory. The water was obtained from a well on the grounds and was pumped to a large storage tank. The sewage passed through septic tanks and filter beds, the effluent ultimately discharging into a small stream.35

The grounds comprised 1,123 acres, partly utilized for farm, dairy, and poultry purposes.35

It was found that considerable remodeling, painting, improving the plumbing, electric lighting, and storage facilities were necessary,36 and the work was at once started. The expenditure of the necessary funds for this remodeling and repair was approved by the Secretary of War on September 21, 1918, and on October 28, 1918, the work was begun. All alterations and repairs were completed on February 15, 1919, the total cost being $37,000.

The first of the personnel for this hospital arrived on October 7, 1918. On November 2, 1918, there were 203 patients;37 and from that date until the date of closing, June 24, 1919, the number of patients ran from two to three hundred,37 the hospital being maintained with a bed capacity of 340. It was found to be impossible to maintain the hospital at its capacity of 400 patients, as was done under State authority, because of the necessity for housing personnel.

In May, 1919, it was determined that the necessity for the maintenance of this hospital no longer existed and recommendation was made that it be discontinued.38 The Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service signified his intention of securing it for the care of war risk insurance patients. Early in June the assignment of patients to this hospital was discontinued, the patients then under treatment being disposed of by discharge and by transfer to the care of the Bureau of War Risk Insurance, and 104 cases requiring further treatment were transferred to General Hospital No. 43, at Hampton, Va. On June 24, 1919, the hospital was closed as an Army institution.39

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 34, East Norfolk, Mass., from November, 1918, to June 24, 1919, inclusive


598

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 35, WEST BADEN, IND.

General Hospital No. 35 consisted of the West Baden Springs and the Sutton Hotels at West Baden, Ind. The West Baden Springs Hotel was leased on September 28, 1918,40 effective October 15, 1918, at $125,000 per year; and

FIG. 190.-General Hospital No. 35, West Baden, Ind.

the lease included all the hotel buildings, a golf course, and 620 acres of farm land.40 The Sutton Hotel was leased on September 30, 1918,41 effective October 15, 1918, at $4,041 per year. During the first half month, however, a sum of $3,750 was spent, in addition to the rent proper, for the necessary improvement and alteration of this property.


599

The West Baden Springs Hotel consisted of seven buildings, the hotel proper being used as the main hospital building. This was a six-story circular building constructed of brick, with a stucco exterior. It was curiously designed of four walls, concentrically arranged, the innermost encircling a dome-covered, marble-walled court, 200 feet in diameter and 135 feet high. The space between the two outermost and that between the two innermost walls was divided into rooms; and there was a circular hallway between the second and third concentric walls. There were 708 rooms, exclusive of the lobby, rotunda, ball rooms, card rooms, the kitchen, and dining room, and the rooms between the two inner walls looked out into the court on all floors.40 This building, with its famous dome, formerly the main hotel, was constructed in 1890; and in it were located the majority of the hospital activities, such as wards for the sick and the rooms for the surgical, eye, ear, nose, throat, X-ray and dental work, treatment rooms, professional offices, etc. The original hotel dining room, three stories high, was connected with and structurally a part of the main hotel building. In addition to providing an 80-bed ward on an upper floor, it was retained for the mess hall of the hospital. The hotel kitchen, two stories in height, was a part of the dining room building. After being renovated it was continued in use as the hospital kitchen. Situated immediately to the rear of, but separated from the above structures, was a three-story brick building formerly used as the hotel garage and as quarters for employees. In adapting it to hospital purposes, the two upper stories were renovated, sufficient toilet facilities were installed, and it was used for barracks; the garage was continued in use as such. A three-story building, formerly used as a bath house, was converted into barracks on the third floor, the first and second floors being continued as baths. The powerhouse and laundry were continued in use as such. The natatorium, a two-story brick building, had on the ground floor a swimming pool, running the full length of the building, and it was surrounded by rooms opening onto the pool. Its second floor was similarly arranged, the rooms opening onto a gallery looking down upon the pool. These rooms were used for the accommodation of Medical Department personnel.42

The alteration work began in October, 1918, and was completed in March of the following year. Throughout this period the buildings were occupied and operated as a hospital, the perfection of facilities causing no great amount of disturbance.

The Sutton Hotel was a U-shaped building covering an area of about 100 feet square. Its main portion had four stories and the two wings were three storied. Its outside walls were of concrete blocks, except on the fourth story mansard front sections. This building was situated about 1,500 feet from the West Baden Hotel and was used as nurses' quarters.40 Prior to its occupancy it was necessary to increase the heating facilities, to thoroughly renovate the building, and to install additional toilet facilities, particularly on the top floor.

These two properties, as altered, and without the establishment of specialties, combined to make a very satisfactory general hospital for the treatment of general medical and surgical cases.  Reconstruction facilities were not fully developed, but all other activities common to the best general hospitals were established. The total cost was $123,000.  


600

The original estimate indicated that from 1,200 to 1,400 beds could be provided.40 This estimate was based on the intention to house all personnel in temporary buildings to be constructed, a scheme, however, which was not followed out in the utilization of the property.

The designation "General Hospital No. 35" was made on October 24, 1918,43 and the hospital opened on November 2, 1918, at a 500-bed capacity, and on November 2344 the first sick arrived, the bed capacity having been increased in the meantime to 650. By December 7, 1918, there were 400 sick under treatment;45 and thereafter the number receiving treatment varied little until March, 1919, when, the alteration work having been completed, a maximum capacity of 800 beds was available.45 A decline in the number of sick began in March, 1919, and continued until the hospital was abandoned.45 This was due to the fact that from March 1 the transfer of sick to this hospital was discontinued; and on that date the Surgeon General recommended it be closed on May 15.46 On March 1247 the Secretary of War authorized the abandonment of the hospital. The sick remaining under treatment were disposed of by discharge and transfer, at the rate of about 50 each week, until April 29, when the last sick had been moved out. On May 8, 1919, the hospital was closed;48 and the transfer back to the lessor was effected under a new agreement between the latter and the Government, dated April 14, 1919, wherein both damages and improvements to the property were adjusted.49


601

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 36, DETROIT, MICH.

The Ford Hospital, the use of which, for military hospital purposes, was tendered the Government by the owner in the summer of 1918,50 was a group of buildings centrally located in a 20-acre plot in the residential district of Detroit, and fronted on West Grand Boulevard between Hamilton Boulevard and Byron Street. There were the original Henry Ford Hospital, with a

FIG. 191.-General Hospital No. 36, Detroit, Mich.

capacity of 65 beds, and a new one under construction, the estimated bed capacity of which was 500, all in private rooms.51

The property was inspected, preliminary negotiations were made, and on September 11, 1918, the Surgeon General recommended to the War Department that the hospital be leased.52 On October 5, 1918, a nominal lease at $1 per year was prepared, effective at once, the lease to cover the old as well as the new hospital.53

There were six modern, permanent, brick buildings composing the group, as follows:51 Ward building, surgical building, laboratory, service building, power house, garage, and the new building under construction. The patients' building of about 20,000 square feet of floor space was a three-story structure  


602

divided entirely into bedrooms, completely equipped and in running order. The surgical building, immediately adjoining, was modern and complete, and had about 14,000 square feet of floor space. These buildings were used by the Medical Department with little or no change.54 The laboratory building contained three stories and an attic and had about 10,000 square feet of floor space. Some changes were made in this building and, in addition to those for the laboratory work, facilities for the eye, ear, nose, throat, dental, X-ray, and dispensary work were installed there. The service building, about 40,000 square feet of floor space, was also a three-story building containing, on the first floor, the main kitchen, bakery, and laundry; and on the second floor, the offices, auxiliary kitchen, and laboratory. The third floor was ideally equipped as to plumbing, lighting, etc., and was served by dumb-waiters from the kitchen below. Only minor alterations were necessary to adapt this building to Medical Department use. The power house, producing heat, light, and power for all buildings, was situated in the group, and was not altered in any way. The new building was altered by temporary partitions, plumbing, etc., so as to cover all general hospital activities not already provided for in the old hospital buildings in the rear. As originally planned it was to have private rooms for 500 sick; however, the majority of the permanent partitions were not in place and it was possible to provide over 20 wards in these open spaces, each with a capacity of 45 beds. The plumbing already in place did not adapt itself to this plan, however, and this caused the largest single item of expense. The small rooms already in place were utilized as they stood for the various smaller and more isolated activities of the hospital. Physical reconstruction shops and schools, some additional diet kitchens, and treatment rooms were installed in the building. In making all alterations and additions the chief aim was to find a stopping place that would permit the final construction of the Ford Hospital to be carried out without the necessity of tearing out a large part of the interior of the building and otherwise entailing considerable expense in effecting the readjustment of Government construction when the building should be abandoned as a Government hospital. The alteration work was completed late in March, 1919, and its total cost was $91,000.

After all work was done, a careful survey was made jointly by representatives of the War Department and the owner, and it was estimated that about $48,000 would be required to undo what had been done and to put the property in its original condition or in such condition that the owner would not suffer loss as a result of Army occupancy.55

The hospital was designated General Hospital No. 36 on October 24, 1918.56 Organization having been completed and some space being available, it was opened for sick on February 1, 1919, with 43 patients and a capacity of 300.57 By May 1, 1919, the capacity had been increased to 1,000, and at this time 659 sick were under treatment.57 From this day until July 1, 1919, the capacity remained the same and the number of sick constantly under treatment did not vary materially.57

Recommendation was made, June 19, 1918, that the hospital be abandoned August 1, 1919.58 No sick were sent to this hospital after July 1, 1919. On June 16, 1919, the United States Public Health Service requested that this hospital be turned over to that service.59 As the owners greatly desired to  


603

reestablish this hospital, the United States Public Health Service withdrew its request for the property.59 On August 1060 the hospital was abandoned, and on the 14th the property was turned back to the lessor. Between July 1 and 15, all sick requiring further treatment were transferred to General Hospital No. 28, Fort Sheridan, Ill.

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 36, Detroit, Mich., from November, 1918, to July, 1919, inclusive


604

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 37, MADISON BARRACKS, N. Y.

The military reservation of Madison Barracks, situated immediately adjacent to the town of Sackets Harbor and lying along the shore of Black River Bay in the northern part of Jefferson County, N. Y., had been owned and used by the Government as a military station since the early part of the nineteenth century. Prior to the declaration of war, it had been used as a regimental Infantry post, and when war was declared there were about 100 buildings on the reservation.61

During the early spring of 1917 an officers' training camp was established there and soon the military population grew so that it was necessary to erect 20 additional buildings of very temporary construction. It was in this status when the post became converted to a general hospital.61

As early as May, 1917, the Surgeon General planned to create a general hospital at this station, and in that month the first request was made upon the War Department for the use of the permanent barracks.62 On June 30, the Surgeon General, quoting the authority of the Secretary of War of June 23, directed the Surgeon of the Eastern Department to have plans prepared and to call for the construction of additional temporary buildings, if required, in order to create a base or general hospital at this station.63 On October 12, 1917, the post surgeon submitted plans for the adaptation of the post for general hospital purposes.64 In these plans he proposed to use only the permanent buildings, stating that the existing temporary buildings were of an entirely too temporary character, particularly for that climate, and that money spent in the attempt to fit them for occupancy by the sick would be of little avail. He contemplated a 500-bed hospital in his plans and requested the allotment of $39,000 to accomplish the work. This post, however, was still occupied by troops. At that time about 2,000 recruits were under training and it was expected that they would be there for some time. The plan could not be proceeded with.

In May, 1917, three temporary ward buildings had been added to the post hospital, giving it a capacity of approximately 100 beds, but these beds were needed for the care of the sick of the troops constantly stationed at the post and had nothing to do with the general hospital project.61

For practically a year nothing was accomplished toward the development of large general hospital facilities at this station, for from October, 1917, until September, 1918, the post was occupied, containing from 700 to 1,900 troops; consequently the buildings could not be made available for hospital purposes.

On September 11, 1918,65 the Surgeon General made another request for the use of this post for general hospital purposes, and on October 24, 1918, it was designated General Hospital No. 37.66

The plan for the hospital contemplated the conversion of the permanent barracks into wards by the installation of toilet facilities, nurses' rooms, utility rooms, the cutting of doorways, thorough renovation, interior painting, and the connection of the buildings by inclosed corridors; it included, also, the conversion of one floor of the administration building into a general mess and kitchen, and covered the alteration, for hospital use, of nine temporary cantonment buildings, by the installation of sheathing, interior lining, better heating, and the reinforcement of floors to conserve heat.64 The plan was approved and was partially carried out. It was determined that it would be unprofitable to use the temporary buildings for sick, as even lavish amounts of preparation and  


605

renovation would not render them satisfactory, for it was practically impossible to heat them during the cold winters, such as are common to this latitude. The full general hospital development anticipated at this station was never carried out, but approximately $50,000 was spent for the various improvements and repairs.

When the station was designated General Hospital No. 37 in October, 1918, it had a capacity of 100 beds, and 50 sick were under treatment.67 A month later, the capacity had been increased to 300, and at this time 133 sick were under treatment.67 From then on, the number of sick receiving treatment increased but little. After the middle of February, 1919, no more sick were sent from the ports of embarkation or from any other source, and on March 1,68 it was recommended to the Secretary of War that this hospital be changed to a post hospital. The above recommendation was approved March 4, 1919, and went into effect at once.69

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 37, Madison Barracks N,Y., from November, 1918, to March 4, 1919, inclusive


606

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 38, EASTVIEW, N. Y.

General Hospital No. 38, formerly the Westchester County Almshouse and Penitentiary, was situated in the Pocantico Hills, Westchester County, N. Y., 2 miles east of Eastview station on the New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, 3 miles east of Tarrytown, and 4 miles north of White Plains. This property was leased from the county of Westchester October 7, 1918, effective October 10, 1918, and included 150 acres of farm land, part of which was ready for cultivation, and the following buildings: The Westchester County Almshouse, the Westchester County Penitentiary, and the power plant, including the laundry, cold-storage plant, bakery, and storage facilities.70 The rental for the first year was $190,000 and thereafter $140,000 per year.70

The almshouse was a brick and stone fireproof structure with two floors and a high, well lighted and aired basement. The buildings were arranged in quadrangles surrounding three large courts and were either continuous or were

FIG. 192.-General hospital No. 38, Eastview, N. Y.

connected by wide closed corridors; they were comparatively narrow and therefore very light and airy. The construction was modern in every way and the buildings were new, white, and clean, though not quite complete, especially in regard to electric installation, cooking equipment, window shades, and screening, but they were exceptionally well adapted for hospital purposes. The almshouse contained its own kitchens (without equipment), dining rooms, assembly hall and chapel, and was well provided with large dormitories, wide hallways, and a moderate number of private rooms.71

The penitentiary, situated 300 yards from the almshouse, was a comparatively new building and had been occupied about one year. It had a capacity of about 275 prisoners and a space for officers, guards, etc. It was a handsome building of its kind, quadrangular in plan, very unlike a prison, and of high­class fireproof construction. It contained its own little hospital, four schoolrooms, an assembly room, a modern kitchen with mechanical equipment, and dining rooms. The apartments for the officials and guards were excellent in every way, and the cells for the prisoners were equipped each with its own cot,  


607

desk, lavatory, and toilet, and each was individually ventilated. The interior as a whole was lavishly appointed and of pleasing appearance throughout.71 

The power house, containing also the bakery, laundry, cold-storage plant, and storage rooms, continued in use during the Army occupancy.72

At the time of the original survey, resulting in the acquisition of the property, it was estimated that 1,300 sick could be accommodated, provided that temporary quarters for the nurses were constructed.71 It was also estimated that the capacity could be extended to 2,000 by the utilization of the many wide hallways and corridors and by the closing of many open porches, and that $235,000 would be required to do this work.71 There was some thought at that time that the property might be used for the treatment of mental cases, as at this particular time it seemed necessary that some additional space be

FIG. 193.-Recreation room, General Hospital No. 38, Eastview, N. Y.

provided for this class of sick. It was determined, however, not to construct new temporary buildings for nurses' quarters and not to send mental cases to this hospital.

The personnel for the development of the hospital began to arrive in late October and early November, 1918, and the work of alteration and occupation began. In the meantime a complete study had been made of the property and plans prepared for the necessary alterations.73 The work was carried on through the winter and completed in March, 1919.

The following alterations were made in the almshouse: In the basement there were installed the shops for reconstruction activities, the schoolrooms, hospital and quartermaster stores, and many other activities similarly adapted to basement space.73 The kitchens were created mainly by the installation of  


608

necessary equipment for the preparation of food and facilities for cooking and dish washing. The operating suite, the eye, ear, nose, and throat section, and other specialties were easily installed in the small rooms which contained running water, sinks, and other necessary plumbing facilities.73 The laboratory, X-ray rooms, and pharmacy were installed in a similar way where the least amount of alteration was necessary.73 Linen rooms, the post office, the receiving department, treatment rooms, etc., were installed in a similar manner, but as the number of small rooms was not sufficient for such isolated activities, a considerable amount of partitioning was necessary.73 The majority of the sick were provided for in large wards, 20 of which alone gave a capacity of 850. Each of these wards was provided with appropriate ward offices, a utility room, a toilet, and a serving room.73 The provision of window shades and screening was a considerable item, but was very necessary.73 The essential outside work comprised the construction of board walks, much roadway-the existing roads were unsuitable for heavy trucks-temporary buildings for stables, and a garage. The sewage disposal system, not being sufficient for the increased population caused by military occupation, had to be enlarged. The water supply was insufficient too, and it was necessary to install a pumping unit near the Catskill aqueduct.

This property was designated "General Hospital No. 38" by War Department orders on November 28, 1918.74 Though alterations had not been completed in many respects, it was opened as a general hospital in January, 1919, with a capacity of 500, and a small group of sick was received at once.75 The number of sick increased until March, when it had risen to 833.76 The capacity in the meantime had been increased to 820. Some of this capacity, however, was not realized, as nurses' quarters were not built, and the nurses were housed in the hospital building proper; the maximum capacity for the sick was therefore about 750.76 From March until June, 1919, the number of patients remained in the vicinity of 1,000, although at one time, in May, a maximum of 1,133 was being treated in the hospital.76 After May the decrease in the number treated was rapid and by July, 1919, it had dropped to 519.76 In the meantime, on June 18, the abandonment of this institution had been recommended to take effect July 15,77 and the War Department's approval was received on June 24.78 No more patients were sent to the hospital from this time on, and of the 519 above referred to only 189, requiring further general hospital treatment, were remaining at the time of closure. These patients were sent by hospital train to General Hospital No. 2, and the institution was closed on July 15.79 Steps had already been taken to cancel the lease and to return this property to the lessor. This was effected in September, 1919.80


609

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 38, Eastview, N. Y., from December, 1918, to July 15, 1919, inclusive

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 40, ST. LOUIS, MO.

The City Infirmary of St. Louis and one building of the City Isolation Hospital were leased November 4, 1918, effective November 15, 1918, at $65,000 for the first quarter and $4,950 per quarter thereafter.81 The $65,000 for the first quarter, less the normal rental of $4,950, was intended to reimburse the city for the reconstruction of Christian Brothers' College Building, which had recently been partially destroyed by fire and into which property the city 


610

FIG. 194


611

proposed to move the 850 inmates of the infirmary when the War Department was given possession of the infirmary buildings.81

The city infirmary was located in the southwestern section of the city, 4½ miles from the Union Station. The property, 14 acres in all, was situated fronting on Arsenal Street and was a mile from Tower Grove Station of the Union Pacific and Frisco Railroads, a spur from the former extending into the grounds. There were 12 brick buildings and 13 small frame buildings; the former housed the inmates, personnel, and infirmary offices, and the latter were used for storage, recreation, farming, poultry, and gardening purposes.81

For some time prior to this period the city of St. Louis had been desirous of a hospital so that its war injured might be treated near their homes, and with this object in view had suggested Jefferson Barracks. However, space had not been available on the post for a general hospital and the project was never consummated.

Now that the city had leased its infirmary, to which possession was to be given November 15, 1918, all haste was necessary to rebuild the Christian Brothers' College and move thereto the old people from the infirmary.

On November 20, after the signing of the armistice and after a thorough study of the base and general hospital situation in the United States had been made, in reference to the probable return of overseas sick and wounded, the Surgeon General recommended that the lease of this property be canceled, stating that the space would not be required.82 On December 10, however, the Secretary of War issued instructions to develop the St. Louis infirmary.83 On December 12, the Surgeon General requested reconsideration of the matter and gave additional reasons why he thought it unnecessary and inadvisable to begin at this time the alteration of the property for general hospital use.84 Again the project rested and so far as the Government was concerned nothing was done. The city of St. Louis, however, even though uncertain of what the Government was going to do ultimately, proceeded under the terms of the lease and began the reconstruction of the Christian Brothers' College. This work progressed slowly, and as late as January 15, 1919, it was far from complete and the infirmary could not be vacated.85

It might have been possible for the Government to have done some repair work in the infirmary, but until all the inmates could be removed, and especially 30 old people who were sick, the more necessary alterations required for our use, especially on the plumbing, cooking, and operating facilities, could not be proceeded with.85 This briefly was the status when, on January 9, 1919, the Secretary of War informed the Surgeon General that one building of the infirmary was emptied and ready to be turned over to the War Department, and instructed the Surgeon General to take charge of the St. Louis hospital project and put it in condition to receive patients.86

In compliance with the above instructions the Surgeon General's Office and the Construction Division proceeded at once to put the property in condition to receive patients. Though still occupied by a majority of the inmates, all work began on portions still occupied.  It was soon apparent that the $65,000 allotted would not complete the work; that the Christian Brothers' College could not be finished before late February or March, and it was felt that the little use to be derived from the new hospital would not repay the expenditure  


612

on the infirmary and the college and the moving of the old people from their home and hospital.87 The Surgeon General was informed by the director of public welfare of St. Louis, who had at all times been the spokesman for the city, that Jefferson Barracks would still be quite acceptable to the city, and that he would welcome its use or any other solution that would curtail expense.

Though essentially good, and well arranged generally, the infirmary buildings were old and the toilet fixtures, plumbing, steam radiators, electric wiring, wood floors, sash and trimming, and hardware were in an unsatisfactory condition and required repair or replacement. The infirmary hospital as such was satisfactory, but it was necessary to make considerable changes to convert it into a surgical suite for a 550-bed hospital with special facilities for maxillofacial work, and to utilize the remaining space for surgical wards.81 Much painting was done throughout to remove the institutional odor so common in such properties. In general, the character of the alteration work consisted of changes throughout to provide the necessary toilet, diet, kitchen,

FIG. 195.-General Hospital No. 40, St. Louis, Mo.

utility-room, and treatment-room facilities; repairing of walls, ceilings, woodwork, floors, radiators, piping, etc.; installation of new plumbing fixtures, additional radiation, a new hot water heating plant, electric fixtures, and new hardware. The work was completed late in March, 1919; and the total cost of alteration in the infirmary buildings was $129,000.

It was designated General Hospital No. 40 on February 4, 1919,88 and was opened in March with a capacity of 550 beds.89 All maxillofacial injuries belonging to the Central West and all general medical and surgical cases, assignable to the St. Louis area, not already covered by other general hospitals, were ordered to this hospital and 50 such cases were admitted the first week in April. The number was gradually added to throughout April and May, 1919, and by June, 265 were receiving treatment here.89

On April 28, however, the Surgeon General again recommended the abandonment of this hospital, together with the abandonment of five or six other general hospitals no longer required.90 On June 3 the Secretary of War directed that it be abandoned on or before June 15 and transferred to the United States Public Health Service.91 On June 6 one half of the 250 patients,  


613

including all maxillofacial cases under treatment, were sent to the hospital at Jefferson Barracks, where there was sufficient space for them and where preparations for this specialty were provided; the remainder were sent to the hospital at Fort Riley, Kans.92 On June 12 the hospital was transferred to the United States Public Health Service.93

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 40, St. Louis, Mo., from March, 1919, to June 15, 1919, inclusive

REFERENCES

(1) Letter from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, Eastern Department, June 23, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks at certain posts for general and base hospital accommodations. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).  

(2) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 22, 1918. Subject: Transfer of Plattsburg Barracks to the Medical Department as a general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Plattsburg Bks.) N.

(3) First indorsement, War Department, A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, September 2, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.


614

(4) First indorsement, War Department, S. G. O. to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 30, Plattsburg Barracks, N. Y., September 26, 1918. Subject: Allotments for construction and repair of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Plattsburg Bks.) N.

(5) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, June 25, 1918. Subject: General hospital facilities for nervous and mental cases. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(6) Extract from report of investigation at post hospital, Plattsburg Barracks N. Y., made by Maj. Wm. H. Hobson, Inspector General's Department, August 19 to 22, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 333 (Plattsburg Bks.) N.

(7) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(8) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, September 3, 1919. Subject: Discontinuance of General Hospital No. 30, Plattsburg Barracks, N. Y., On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.72-3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 30) K.

(9) First indorsement from War Department, S. G. O. to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 30, Plattsburg Barracks, N. Y., September 13, 1919. Subject: Transfer of patients on closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.72-3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 30) K. 

(10) Letter from the Secretary of Interior to the Secretary of War, July 16, 1918. Subject: Indian School at Carlisle, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601-1 (Carlisle, Pa.) F.

(11) Letter from Lieut. Col. Edgar King, M. C., to the Surgeon General, July 27, 1918. Subject: Carlisle Indian School, Carlisle, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Carlisle, Pa.) F. 

(12) Third indorsement from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, September 6, 1918. Subject: Condition of Carlisle Indian School. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 31) K.

(13) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, August 15, 1918. Subject: Designation of hospital. Also fifth indorsement thereto from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, September 24, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 31) K.

(14) Shown on weekly bed report. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(15) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 32, Chicago, Ill., March 8, 1919, by Col. W. P. Chamberlain, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K. 

(16) Letter from committee authorized to secure hospital sites, to Brig. Gen. H. S. Johnson, Director of Purchase, Storage and Traffic, October 9, 1918. Subject: Lease, Cooper-Monatah Hotel, Forty-seventh Street and Drexel Boulevard. On file, Record Room, S. G. O. 601 (Cooper-Monatah Hotel, Chicago, Ill.) S.

(17) Shown on plans of General Hospital No. 32. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(18) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, December 5, 1918. Subject: Designation of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K.

(19) Telegram from Darby to Surgeon General, January 11, 1919. Subject: Opening of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K.

(20) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(21) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to the Director of Operations, April 15, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 32, Chicago, Ill. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481.1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K.

(22) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, May 5, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 32, Chicago, Ill.  On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K.

(23) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, May 2, 1919. Subject: Transfer of General Hospital No. 32 to Public Health Service. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K.

(24) Telegram from Darby to the Surgeon General, June 15, 1919. Subject: Closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 32) K.

(25) Memorandum from Lieut. Col. G. F. Juenemann, M. C., to the Surgeon General, May 28, 1918. Subject: Fort Logan H. Roots, Ark. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Fort Logan H. Roots) N.

(26) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 18, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks of certain posts for hospital purposes. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(27) Letter from The Adjutant General to commanding general, Southeastern Department, June 23, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks of certain posts for general or base hospital accommodations. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).  


615

(28) Night letter from the Surgeon General to department surgeon, Southeastern Department, June 25, 1917, Subject: Instructions to submit hospital plans. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(29) First indorsement from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General for the officer in charge, cantonment construction, December 4, 1917. Subject: Approval of funds for renovation and alteration of buildings at Fort Logan H. Roots, Ark. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 600.3 (Fort Logan H. Roots) N.

(30) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, January 11, 1918. Subject: Hospital at Fort Logan H. Roots, Ark. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 33) K.

(31) Letter from The Adjutant General to all department and camp commanders and all bureau chiefs, October 1, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 33) K.

(32) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(33) First indorsement from Post Hospital, Fort Logan H. Roots, Ark., to the Surgeon General, March 11, 1919. Subject: Closing of hospital as a general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 33) K.

(34) Letter from superintendent, Norfolk State Hospital, East Norfolk, Mass., to Maj. Frankwood E. Williams, Division of Neurology and Psychiatry, Surgeon General's Office, August 21, 1918. Subject: Use of Norfolk State Hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Norfolk, Mass.) S.

(35) Report on Norfolk State Hospital, Norfolk, Mass., made by Lieut. Col. John A. Hornsby, M. C., October 5, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Norfolk State Hospital, Norfolk, Mass.) F.

(36) Letter from the Surgeon General to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 34, East Norfolk, Mass., November 19, 1918. Subject: Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Gen. Hosp. No. 34) K. 

(37) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(38) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, May 2, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No 34, East Norfolk, Mass. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 34) K.

(39) First indorsement from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 34, East Norfolk, Mass., to the Surgeon General, June 24, 1919. Subject: Closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 34) K.

(40) Letter from the committee authorized to secure hospital sites, to the Director of Purchase, Storage and Traffic, October 2, 1918. Subject: Lease of West Baden Springs Hotel, West Baden, Ind. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (West Baden, Ind.) F.

(41) Letter from the committee authorized to secure hospital sites, to the Director of Purchase, Storage and Traffic, October 2, 1918. Subject: Lease of Hotel Sutton, West Baden, Ind. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (West Baden, Ind.) F.

(42) Letter from hospital commission to construction quartermaster, West Baden, Springs Hotel, West Baden, Ind., October 29, 1918. Subject: Conversion West Baden Springs Hotel into a hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (West Baden, Ind.) F.

(43) First indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, October 24, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(44) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 35, to the Surgeon General, November 24, 1918. Subject: Arrival of patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 35) K.

(45) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(46) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, March 1, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 35, West Baden, Ind. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 602.1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 35, Misc. Section).

(47) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 12, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 35, West Baden, Ind. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 35) K.

(48) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 35 to the Surgeon General, May 8, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 35) K.  


616

(49) Agreement entered into on the 14th day of April, 1919, between the West Baden Springs Co., lessors, and Lieut. Col. Floyd Kramer, M. C., U. S. Army, lessee. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481-1 (West Baden, Ind.) F.

(50) Letter from E. G. Liebold, secretary and treasurer, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., to Lieut. Col. John A. Hornsby, M. C., June 3, 1918. Subject: Use of Henry Ford Hospital for the Government. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich.) F.

(51) Report on Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., made by Lieut. Col. John A. Hornsby, M. C., October 7, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich.) F.

(52) Letter from the Acting Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, September 11, 1918. Subject: Lease of Ford Hospital at Detroit, Mich. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Detroit, Mich.) S.

(53) Contained in lease. Copy on file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Detroit, Mich.) F.

(54) Shown on plans of General Hospital No. 36. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(55) Supplemental agreement between Henry Ford Hospital and U. S. Army, entered into May 15, 1920. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680 4-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 36) K.

(56) First indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, October 24, 1918. Subject: Designation of General Hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(57) Shown on bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(58) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to the Director of Operations, General Staff, June 19, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of lease of General Hospital No. 36, Detroit, Mich. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 36) K.

(59) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, August 14, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 36, Detroit, Mich. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 36) K.

(60) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 36, to the Surgeon General, August 10, 1919. Subject: Report on closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 36) K.

(61) Letter from surgeon, Madison Barracks, N. Y., to the Surgeon General, December 22, 1917. Subject: Report on the post. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-6 (Madison Bks.) N. 

(62) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 18, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks at certain posts for base or general hospital purposes. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(63) Letter from the Surgeon General to the department surgeon, Eastern Department, June 30, 1917. Subject: Plans for base hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(64) Plans on file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (Madison Bks.).

(65) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, September 11, 1918. Assignment of Madison Barracks for hospital purposes. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.3 (Madison Bks.) N.

(66) First indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, October 24, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(67) Shown on bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(68) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Adjutant General, March 1, 1919.  Subject: Designation of General Hospital No. 37, Madison Barracks, N. Y., as a post hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 37) K.

(69) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 4, 1919. Subject: Designation of hospital at Madison Barracks, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 37) K.

(70) Letter from Mr. Guy M. Rush to Maj. James S. Holden, Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division, General Staff, October 11, 1918. Subject: Report on Westchester County Hospital and Penitentiary. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (Gen. Hosp. No. 38).

(71) Report on Westchester County Almshouse and Penitentiary, White Plains, N. Y., made by Lieut. Col. John A. Hornsby, M. C., October 1, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 000.6 (White Plains, N. Y.) F.  


617

(72) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 38, Eastview, N. Y., made on February 16, 1919, by Col. W. S. Shields, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38) K.

(73) Shown on plans of General Hospital No 38. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(74) Second indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, November 28, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospital. On file, Mail and Record Division A. G. O., 680.1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38) Misc. Section.

(75) Telegram from Connolly, Eastview, N. Y., to the Surgeon General, January 2, 1919. Subject: Opening of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38) K.

(76) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(77) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to the Director of Operations, General Staff, June 18, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of lease. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38) Misc. Section.

(78) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, June 23, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 38, East View, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38) K.

(79) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 38, to the Surgeon General, September 1, 1919. Subject: Final report of closing. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38).

(80) Letter from the Chief of Real Estate Service, War Department, to the county of Westchester, N. Y. August 30, 1919. Subject: Notice of cancellation of lease. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 38) K.

(81) Letter from Guy M. Rush, real estate expert, to the Chief of Real Estate Section, Purchase, Storage and Traffic Division, General Staff, November 5, 1918. Subject: Report on city infirmary and isolation hospital, St. Louis, Mo. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601-1 (St. Louis, Mo.) F.

(82) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, November 20, 1918. Subject: Withdrawal of hospital projects. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(83) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, December 10, 1918. Subject: Hospital accommodations for the region about Philadelphia and St. Louis. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Phila. Pa.) F.

(84) First indorsement from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, December 12, 1918. Subject: Request for reconsideration of matter. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Phila., Pa.) F.

(85) Memorandum from Lieut. Col. Floyd Kramer, M. C., to the Surgeon General, February 1, 1921.  Subject: Reasons for verbal request for reconsideration of cancellation of lease on St. Louis Infirmary. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Jefferson Bks.) N.

(86) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, January 9, 1919. Subject: Hospital at St. Louis, Mo. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (St. Louis, Mo.) F.

(87) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 40, to the Surgeon General, February 12, 1919. Subject: Alterations of plans and retrenchment in connection with fitting these buildings for a general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 40) K.

(88) First indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, February 4, 1919. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322. 3(General Hospitals) K.

(89) Shown on bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(90) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, April 28, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 40, St. Louis, Mo. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp No. 40) K.

(91) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, June 3, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 40, St. Louis, Mo. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 40) K.

(92) Telegram from Edgar, commanding, to the Surgeon General, June 3, 1919. Subject: Transfer of patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 40) K.

(93) Second indorsement from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 40, St. Louis, Mo., to the Surgeon General, June 14, 1919. Subject: Transfer of hospital to the Public Health Service. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 40) K.

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