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Chapter XXVII

Contents

CHAPTER XXVII

GENERAL HOSPITALS, NOS. 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, AND 29

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 19, OTEEN (AZALEA), N. C.

Early in the year 1918 all hospital space for Army tuberculous patients was, with the exception of the Fort Bayard General Hospital, in relatively unsuitable leased properties. These converted hospitals had, at that time, very little remaining available space; and the accumulation of the tuberculous in the base hospitals of the camps was not only highly undesirable but demanded relief; consequently additional space was vitally required. At this time the lease and purchase of certain tracts of land in the mountainous regions of North Carolina, to be used for hospital purposes, was begun under the authority of the Secretary of War.1 When completed, about 400 acres had been acquired.2 The land so secured was situated 1 mile from Azalea, 5 miles from Biltmore, and 7 miles from Asheville. Following its acquisition, plans were developed for the construction of a large tuberculosis hospital to consist of over 60 frame buildings having a capacity of 1,000 beds.3 On March 2, 1918, the Secretary of War authorized the construction of the hospital, and work upon it was instituted.1 In the fall of 1918, when the original project was being rapidly completed, and when occupation of the buildings had begun, the construction of an additional group of 200 buildings, with a capacity of 500 beds, was requested and authorized.4

In the first group the wards were of the infirmary and the ambulatory types3, and were grouped about a culinary and administrative center. The 500-bed group consisted of ambulatory wards5 for the most part, which, with but few exceptions, were located on a hill some distance from the main kitchen and mess hall. Between these two main groups a third group of 12 buildings was located.

At first all ambulant patients in the hillside group of wards were required to walk to the mess halls, three-fourths mile distant.6 This was done with a view to hardening and more rapidly rehabilitating them. The scheme was found to be impracticable, and later a mess hall and kitchen were constructed in close proximity to this detached class of sick.

As at General Hospital No. 8, the wards were of three types5-infirmary, ambulatory, and semi-infirmary, the latter type being a compromise between the first two and was determined upon as the construction and use of the wards developed. Much study was given to the subject and every effort was made to provide the facilities for the satisfactory treatment, after care, and instruction of the tuberculous; and all of the usual services of a complete general hospital were provided. In all, 100 buildings, with heating, lighting, plumbing, and sewer connections, were erected, the majority not connected by umbrella walks, and all but one-the heating plant-were of frame construction. In area covered, if not in capacity, this was the largest temporary general hospital constructed during the war. Some conception of its magnitude may be gained from the fact that 40 miles of the following utilities were


553

installed: Roads, sewers, water and steam mains, and electric transmission and distribution lines.

The designed capacity of the hospital was 1,500 beds;7 as actually operated, however, this capacity was not fully realized, due mainly to the fact that the ambulant and infirmary sick were not in the exact ratio anticipated in the construction. It had been estimated that 33 per cent of the tuberculous would be infirmary cases and 55 per cent ambulatory; but it developed that they

FIG. 180

were about equally divided; and late in the war experience, even the reverse of the original ratio obtained. The total cost was $2,750,000.8

On May 25, 1918, it was designated General Hospital No. 19.9 It was opened to the sick in September, 1918,10 and the number under treatment rapidly rose, reaching 1,000 on January 1, 1919.10 The peak, 1,175, was reached in the following May.10 The number varied between 948 and 1,192 throughout the year 1919.10


554

 Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 19, Oteen (Azalea), N. C., from September, 1918, to December 1919, inclusive  


555

 GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 20,  WHIPPLE BARRACKS, ARIZ.

Whipple Barracks had been located 1 mile northeast of Prescott, Ariz., in a bowl-shaped basin among the mountains, at an altitude of about 5,000 feet.11 Between the years 1903-1906 permanent brick and concrete buildings had been erected to provide facilities for quartering a battalion of troops. In 1911 it was practically abandoned as a result of the transfer of troops to the Mexican border.

In February 6, 1918, the Surgeon General recommended the transfer of the post to the Medical Department for use as a general hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis.12 On February 15 the transfer was authorized,13 and on May 25 it was designated "General Hospital No. 20" by the War Department.14 The renovation of the post was begun at once, but for some time

FIG. 181.-Sun porch, General Hospital No. 20, Whipple Barracks, Ariz.

only small expenditures were made for this purpose and for slight alterations. It was apparent, however, that much more space would be required for the treatment of tuberculosis than would be afforded in the altered existing buildings. These were studied, and a plan was evolved whereby certain additional buildings in new construction were to be added, which, with the existing buildings, would give a capacity of approximately 1,300 sick. Based upon this plan, a request was made in July for the construction of a total of about 30 buildings, most of which were to be wards of three types-infirmary, semi­infirmary, and ambulatory;15 all buildings to be of tile and stucco, to have modern improvements, and to be so grouped about the existing buildings as to serve the greatest purpose. The general scheme and plan were altered from time to time, but eventually the project was greatly reduced, the following buildings being actually constructed: 5 two-story wards, 2 one-story wards, and 1 nurses' building, which brought the total capacity of the hospital up to 500 beds. This work was not completed until July, 1919. In the meantime  


556

there was much to disturb the progress of the project: the ever present difficulty of designing and placing new buildings so as to function well with those existing, and the advent of the armistice, which changed the aspect of the problem but did not serve to obviate entirely the necessity for the construction. A portion of the construction was obviated, however, and the capacity was never increased beyond 500 beds. The change from the larger project to the smaller one was effected in January, 1919, when it could be safely predicted that facilities as originally contemplated would not be required.

Reconstruction activities were provided and all the services of a general hospital were started, some completed, others finished on a reduced scale.

The hospital opened for sick in June, 1918,16 with a capacity of 150 beds, most of which were at once filled. While the constructed capacity was 500 beds, this actually was never reached in operation. By October the actual capacity had reached 400 beds, and by that time the patients had increased to an equal number. From this time on until the end of 1919 the hospital was practically full, patients seldom falling as low as 300 in number and oftentimes coinciding with the capacity.17

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 20, Whipple Barracks, Ariz., from June, 1918, to December, 1919, inclusive


557

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 22, PHILADELPHIA, PA.*

On January 19, 1919, the mayor and the director of health and charities of Philadelphia formally offered a portion of the Philadelphia General Hospital to the War Department for hospital purposes at a nominal rental of $1 per year. A board of officers representing the Chief of Staff, the Surgeon General, and the Chief of the Construction Division inspected the various buildings offered, and reported that the property could be adapted to hospital use within a very short period at a cost of $65,000 and that it would provide a capacity of 500 beds.18 The leasing of this property had already been approved on January 6 by the Secretary of War, who desired that it be developed with the least practicable delay.18 The portion offered the Government was the 80-year old group of buildings which had been used in part for the insane. The group for purposes of description may be divided into five sections: a 3-story brick building situated west of the west wing of the administration building; a 4-story brick building comprising the west wing of the administration building of the hospital; a 4-story brick building comprising the east wing of the administration building of the hospital, 600 feet distant over outside walks from the nearest wards; and second floor of the east section of the nurses' home. Section 1 was converted into quarters for the enlisted personnel and into storage space for medical and quartermaster supplies; section 2 was renovated and converted into wards; section 3 was converted into wards and mess and administrative offices; section 4 was made into a kitchen; and section 5, with the use of some paint and the installation of some toilet facilities, became a very good nurses' home.

The construction work cost slightly in excess of $65,000 and consisted, in conjunction with the work above referred to, of painting, calcimining, the refinishing of old floors which had been laid many years previously; the installa­

*After General Hospital No. 22 (Richmond College) was converted into Debarkation Hospital No. 52, the former number was used for this hospital. (See p. 825.)


558

tion of diet kitchens, utility rooms, and dish washers; the replacement of many steam rinsers and some radiation, plastering, and wiring; the removal of iron bars and grating from many of the outside windows, and many other general items of repair and refurnishing. No reconstruction activities were installed in this hospital as it was intended that general medical and surgical cases and venereal diseases would be treated there.

The development of General Hospital No. 22 was unique in at least one respect, and it presented a good example of what could be done in rapid alteration and organization. The Medical Department in January, 1919, did not feel the need of developing general hospital facilities at Philadelphia, and did not originate the request for the use of this institution. However, in a resolution adopted in common council in Philadelphia, January 16, which had been approved by the mayor, it was stated that the War Department desired to use

FIG. 182-General Hospital No. 22, Philadelphia, Pa.

certain buildings and portions of buildings of the Philadelphia General Hospital.19 At about the same time the Director of Operations, General Staff, stated in a memorandum for the Assistant Secretary of War that the development of a hospital in Philadelphia would be particularly appropriate, judging from the strong desire of its citizens for the return of the local wounded to the vicinity of their homes.18

The actual development of the hospital took place in a most expeditious fashion, as had the execution of the lease and the authorization of funds. The project was approved by the Secretary of War on January 6, 1919; the $65,000 was allotted on January 9, and the same day a contractor was recommended for the work. On the following day the contractor received orders to proceed with the work and on January 14 actual funds were transferred to the local contracting quartermaster; complete plans for alteration were prepared; and the work was practically completed by February 18, when additional funds were called for and were made available on the following day. By February 28  


559

the alteration work had been entirely finished and the organization of the hospital was completed and it was ready for sick five days later. This was indeed very rapid work when contrasted with many similar projects carried out early in the war period when it was not uncommon to triple or quadruple this length of time in executing the lease, developing plans, securing funds, and completing the construction. The hospital opened on March 5, 1919, with a capacity of 450 beds20 and within a fortnight 400 sick were being cared for.

In the meantime, however, the problem of how to acquire hospital space had changed to one of how to dispose of hospital space, and 10 general hospitals had been closed. On May 28, 1919, the Surgeon General recommended the abandonment of this hospital.21 The recommendation was approved June 5, the abandonment to be accomplised on or before June 30.22 All sick were transferred prior to June 30, on which date the hospital ceased as a military institution and the control of it was returned to the city of Philadelphia.23

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 22, Philadelphia, Pa.,  from February, 1919, to June, 1919, inclusive


560

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 23, HOT SPRINGS, N. C.

The Mountain Lake Park Hotel was located in the town of Hot Springs, N. C., 38 miles distant by railroad from Asheville. The site of the hotel was on a plateau, popularly called the "dimple" because of the fact that it was completely surrounded by the close-in Southern Appalachian Mountains. The property included a tract 100 acres in extent, quite flat, and triangular in out­line. On it were well arranged shade trees that bordered the roads and walks, and approximately one-fifth of it was cultivatible.

The soil was sandy and the subsoil was a mixture of rock and clay. After rains the surface dried rapidly and there was a constant freedom from mud and dust. The site was well protected from high winds, being surrounded as it was by the mountains.

The French Broad River formed the northeastern boundary of the area, and the tracks of the Southern Railway the southern boundary, as well as the dividing line between the property and the town of Hot Springs, a village of 400 inhabitants.

The climate was mild, usually dry, and very invigorating. The mean summer temperature was found to be 80° F. and the maximum winter temperature 30° F.

The hotel, a four-story frame building, erected in 1880, had been used by the Department of Labor as an internment camp for alien enemies. This department had constructed quite a number of additional temporary buildings in the vicinity of the hotel, the group being divided into two areas: Camp A, consisting of the hotel and some additional barrack buildings, with a capacity of 900, and occupied by ships' officers and the staff of the Department of Labor; and camp B, consisting of 11 barrack buildings, with a capacity of 1,100, occupied by seamen.24

The Secretary of Labor inquired of the Secretary of War as to whether this property could not be profitably used by the War Department for hospital purposes, as it was the intention of the Department of Labor to discontinue the use of the camp.25 At the inception of the negotiations for the transfer it was not represented that the place was undesirable for the purposes of the Department of Labor, but the reason given for its abandonment by that department was that the interned Germans were offensive to the civilians of the community and it was feared that some untoward incident might occur that would prove embarrassing to the United States. The property was inspected by representatives of the Surgeon General's Office, and the gist of their reports was to the effect that, while it was not ideal in location, its water supply was not entirely satisfactory as to quality and quantity, and the temporary buildings and the hotel itself were not in good condition, nevertheless the property should be acquired for hospital purposes. They reported further that for a comparatively small amount of money the whole could be economically converted into a comparatively good military hospital.26

In the spring of 1918 there was every indication that the continuation of war would be prolonged and there was urgent need of providing a large number of general hospitals. Moreover, it was reported that there would be adequate space for 1,200 beds at Hot Springs; so on May 22, the Surgeon General recommended that the property be obtained; and, as it was already under lease by  


561

the Government, that the War Department take over the existing lease, which carried a rental of $18,000 per year.27 The lease was then transferred from the Department of Labor to the War Department as of July 1, 1918.28

It was the intention of the War Department to transfer the interned alien enemies to Fort Oglethorpe, but in July, when this transfer was about to take place, an epidemic of typhoid fever appeared among them, the first cases occurring in camp B on July 20; 150 cases developed, with 17 deaths. All originated in camp B, where, upon investigation, it was found that the cause was due to the use of water from a proscribed well into which seepage had occurred from the French Broad River. There were no cases in camp A.24

While part of the Medical Department personnel had arrived they had not yet begun to function when this epidemic occurred, which, of course, caused delay in removing the prisoners. Meanwhile, the Surgeon General had requested the development of the place for hospital purposes, and the various plans in connection with this work were under way. Although it was not very satisfactory, as has already been indicated, and notwithstanding subsequent reports of inspections, made by representatives of the Surgeon General's Office during the summer and fall, which did not approve the selection, in view of the increasing need for general hospital beds, the work of development was not given up.  The expenditure of the funds, which had been requested in June, was not authorized until August (during which month the hospital was designated General Hospital No. 23); and, as a result of further unavoidable delays, actual construction work was not begun until October 1. Prior to October 1, about $100,000 had been allotted for the development of this hospital; subsequently an additional sum was estimated as necessary for the correction of the water supply. This was disconcerting as it had been understood in the Surgeon General's Office that only a small expenditure would be required to provide excellent water from an unquestionable source not far distant. The development of this source of water was not approved.29

Alteration work was under way at the time of the armistice, and although most of it was accomplished it had not been advanced sufficiently to make the buildings completely available for use. The commanding officer, however, reported an available capacity for 300 ambulatory and 125 bed cases,30 but this space was never fully utilized. The greatest number of sick was 122 in the month of February, 1919.31

In January, 1919, the Surgeon General felt that the general hospital situation was secure and that an emergency which would make the use of this hospital necessary was unlikely to occur in the future. It was therefore recommended on January 31 that it be abandoned.32 This was approved on February 10;33 and on March 15 the hospital was abandoned,34 the few remaining sick having been transferred to General Hospital No. 12, Biltmore, N. C. 


562

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 23, Hot Springs, N. C., from August, 1918, to March 15, 1919, inclusive

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 24, PARKVIEW STATION, PITTSBURGH, PA.

The hospital was located in the reconstructed buildings of a county institution, formerly called the North Side Home, Hoboken, or the Warner House, Claremont; and in an adjacent institution, the Allegheny Workhouse. These buildings were on the north bank of the Allegheny River, on an area of ground 850 feet in width on the river front and 3,700 feet deep, and had been constructed on a terrace 1,100 feet back, thus affording an outlook of marked attractiveness. The terrain in the rear of the buildings was rolling; the newest portion with an upward slope, contained the farm buildings and an old orchard; the northernmost


563

portion was in grain land. The soil was mostly clay with deposits of gravel; the flats along the river were an alluvial deposit from river floods.

The climate was much the same as that of Pittsburgh, with a higher velocity of wind, due to the exposed position. The region was hot in summer and was subject to electrical storms of great intensity.

On April 8, 1918, the Allegheny County commissioners offered the North Side Home to the Medical Department for use for hospital purposes. They proposed a rental of $20,000 per year, though they stated that if this rental seemed too high they would accept any terms deemed proper by the Government.35 There were, exclusive of farm houses, 8 buildings in all, 3 of which-the administration building, the men's building and the women's building-were large brick structures with 3 floors, attic and basement; the other 5 were smaller structures situated in the rear and comprised the mortuary and laundry, bakery, heating plant, shop, and residence. The "home" had not been occu­

FIG. 183-General Hospital No. 24, Parkview Station, Pittsburgh

pied for about two years; the heating system was old, the floors were badly worn, the buildings were gas lighted and in a state of ill repair. The place had been inspected by a representative of the Surgeon General's Office, the conditions were known, and it was realized that a considerable sum ($100,000 was the original tentative estimate) would be required to rehabilitate it to afford facilities for the care of from 750 to 1,000 sick.36 While a rental figure had been proposed, it was within the knowledge of the Surgeon General's Office that the chamber of commerce, the mayor, and the people of Pittsburgh generally desired to offer this property free to the Government, and a nominal lease was accordingly recommended.36 This was approved by the Secretary of War May 2, 1918, to be effective July 1, 1918.37

On July 19, an allotment of $126,000 was made to develop the hospital. Thorough study was given and every effort made to reduce construction and to impress upon those in direct charge of the new hospital and the alteration work that the object was to secure a satisfactory temporary hospital at minimum cost and not to develop, by extensive alteration and durable improvements, an ideal hospital at excessive costs. Subsequent to the above allotment $17,000 more


564

was spent on repairs and alteration; and $62,000 was expended in constructing two new buildings for nurses, the only new buildings added, bringing the total to $205,000.

The work progressed slowly during the late summer, fall, and early winter of 1918. The difficulties encountered were not lessened by the labor situation, which was a constant source of trouble, and at times it was necessary to detail the enlisted men on construction work.

On August 26, 1918, the hospital was designated General Hospital No. 2438 and in October 200 beds were available;39 in December, 350;39 in January, 1919, 600;39 and in April the maximum, 700, had been provided.39 It opened for sick in October and the number of sick in hospital increased pari passu with the capacity of the hospital.39

The bed capacity of this hospital was originally estimated at 750-1,000.36 Subsequent events demonstrated that at least 750 beds should have been made available. The actual capacity developed, exclusive of potential space for 100 patients, vicariously secured by constructing new buildings for 100 nurses, was 600. Experience showed that, with buildings of the character of those at the North Side Home, with a high percentage of basement and attic space, and many small rooms to be utilized, at least 40 per cent of the total floor space could be covered with beds for patients, giving each bed 100 square feet. In this hospital, space was given storage, offices, waiting rooms, dining rooms, the receiving and surgical services, disproportionate to that allotted to beds.

On June 15, 1919, after it had been determined to abandon the hospital, the United States Public Health Service requested its transfer to that service. On July 15 the transfer was affected, all patients having been transferred elsewhere in the meantime.40

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 24, Parkview Station, Pittsburgh, Pa., from July, 1918, to July 22, 1919, inclusive


565

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 25, FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON, IND.

The site upon which Fort Benjamin Harrison had been located, in 1902, was a tract of land consisting of approximately 2,415 acres, and was about 13 miles, by railroad, northeast of Indianapolis. It was an ideal site in many ways; there were a magnificent first growth of forest trees, running streams, and moderately rolling land with green valleys and level fields. The soil was a rich, black loam, and the subsoil was principally gravel.

Permanent buildings had been constructed on the post for domiciliating a regiment of Infantry, and among them were included a permanently constructed post hospital of 66 beds capacity, and an isolation pavilion of 38 beds.41

The first efforts, on the part of the Medical Department, to secure the whole of Fort Benjamin Harrison for general hospital purposes, were made in May, 1917.42 During this month the post was included in a general request, and, in addition, two specific requests for it were made upon the Secretary of War.43

In June, 1917, the commanding general, Central Department, was directed by the Secretary of War to make available as many permanent barracks at Fort Benjamin Harrison as were needed for base or general hospital purposes; and to provide tents at first, and later cantonments, for the well troops thus dispossessed.44 In August, however, the department commander stated that it was his intention to use all of the post for the second training camp and, therefore, he had no space for hospital purposes. Later in the same month, the Secretary of War informed the department commander that 500 beds would  


566

FIG. 184


567

be satisfactory for the Medical Department's use; and asked if the provision of that number in the post hospital and additional available buildings would interfere with the training work, to which the department commander replied 15 days later in the affirmative, stating that no space would be available for hospital purposes. On October 15, 1917, The Adjutant General placed all of the buildings at this post at the disposal of the department commander for Infantry winter quarters after the closure of the training camp, which was to take place November 25.45 In the meantime, as a result of the instructions of the Secretary of War, which he had issued to the department commander in June, to make the permanent barracks available, the department surgeon was directed by the Surgeon General on June 30, to have a base hospital planned at Fort Benjamin Harrison and to make request for any additional buildings that might be required.46 It had been the desire of the Surgeon General to avoid hospital construction, by using this post, along with others, for hospital purposes, and he felt that funds might thus be conserved by putting well troops in temporary barracks, at the same time housing the sick in the more comfortable, permanent buildings. Nothing came of this plan for a base hospital, however; nor was anything done at this post for a long time thereafter in the way of providing a general hospital; and the post buildings were continued in use for training camp purposes.

On September 21, 1918, Fort Benjamin Harrison was at last designated "General Hospital No. 25";47 and in the following month the Secretary of War again directed the department commander, Central Department, to transfer the whole post to the Medical Department that it might be used as a general hospital, with the exception of the following buildings: The storehouse and other buildings, then being used by the Quartermaster Corps, the post administration building, the post exchange, the guardhouse, two barracks, and five officers' quarters.48 These instructions were very explicit, and they would permit neither nullification nor discretionary action on the part of any subordinate commander. Plans were at once prepared, in the Office of the Surgeon General, for the construction of a large number of temporary buildings, which, with the use of the existing and available post buildings, would have given a bed capacity of 2,500.49 The project was much reduced, however, before it had been approved, and was ultimately modified so as to provide but 500 beds in the temporary buildings. This reduced plan was approved by the Secretary of War but was not carried into effect. The urgency of the situation had passed. The commanding officer of the hospital was instructed to do the minimum amount of alteration, to proceed on the assumption that the hospital would not be required for a long period for the treatment of mental cases, and to limit requests for funds for alterations to $5,000 until further orders. The only work that was done, in addition to some temporary wards erected about the post hospital in May, 1917, for post use, was the renovation and alteration of some of the post buildings for hospital use.

The hospital operated under the name and organization of a post hospital until September 21, 1918, when it became a general hospital. Up to that time the sick had varied from 100 to 300 and the capacity had not exceeded 500.50 In October, however, with the use of the post buildings turned over, the capacity was temporarily greatly increased, and about 1,600 sick had been sent there within


568 

a month.50 It was deemed wise not to crowd this hospital as it had been denied complete construction facilities and the number of sick was allowed to fall, in another month, to about 900, near which figure it constantly remained throughout the rest of its existence as a general hospital.50

This hospital when opened treated general medical and surgical cases, but during the winter of 1918-19 it was used for the treatment of mental cases, drug addicts, inebriates, epileptics, and mental defectives. Still later the special work was discontinued and general medical and surgical cases of the more ordinary sort where sent there. On August 4, 1919, it was recommended that the hospital be discontinued as such on September 1, and revert to its former status;51 the approval of the War Department was given on August 852and the discontinuance was carried into effect, as contemplated, on September 1.53

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 25, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., from September, 1918, to August, 1919, inclusive


569

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 26, FORT DES MOINES, IOWA

Fort Des Moines was located within 5¼ miles of the city of Des Moines, Iowa, on a rolling terrain that was slightly wooded with dwarf timber. The soil was a rich, black loam fully 3½ feet thick, superimposed upon a clayey loam-the "Iowa glacial" drift. The soil was readily metamorphosed into an almost impalpable dust, which was easily carried by the winds in dry weather, and in wet weather it became a tenaceous mud; but as the post was well sodded and provided with gravel roads and cement walks, no real inconvenience was caused by mud. The summers were usually hot and dry, and the winters severely cold and attended by much snow; the falls were ideally pleasant, but the springs were usually cold and damp, with much rain and occasional cyclonic storms.

The early history of the general hospital, which was finally established at this station, is drawn out over a long period of time, as the following chronologically arranged events will bear testimony: On July 2, 1917,54 the Surgeon General requested the use of the permanent buildings at Fort Des Moines for hospital purposes, and on the day following, the Secretary of War authorized the department commander, Central Department, to turn over the necessary barracks at Fort Des Moines for base and general hospital purposes.55 On the same day, July 3,56 the Surgeon General directed the department surgeon, Central Department, to make plans for a large base hospital at Des Moines and to call for any additional buildings required. On September 11, 1917,57 the Surgeon General requested the construction of two psychiatric wards and two isolation wards, the conversion of a storehouse into a receiving ward, the conversion of four stables into barracks, and a mess hall for Medical Department men, and the conversion of the post exchange and gymnasium into a dispensary, eye, ear, nose, and throat and dental building, and funds for this work were allotted in October, 1917. This was the first project of any size contemplated at this place, but the construction was delayed and the work was not completed until May, 1918, when a bed capacity of 1,100 had been obtained.  


570

FIG. 185


571

On October 15, 1917,58 the Secretary of War telegraphed the department commander that Fort Des Moines would be at his disposal when the Reserve Officers' Training Camp and Medical School ended on the same date, but that only one battalion of Infantry would be stationed at the post. On November 7, 1917, the Surgeon General requested the use of the whole post for general hospital purposes;59 and on January 4, 1918,60 he requested the designation of Fort Des Moines as a general hospital, the same request being repeated in the following February. On March 14, 1918,61 the Secretary of War disapproved this request. In April the post hospital was designated as a base hospital. On May 1362 the Surgeon General again recommended that this station be designated a general hospital. There was space here now for sick, and it was desired to use it to the very best advantage. In August the station was designated a department base hospital. On September 11, 1918,63 the Surgeon General again requested that this post be made a general hospital; and on September 21 the request was approved.64

A number of projects for the further development of this post were then studied and a satisfactory construction project was developed contemplating 10 buildings and some alterations in existing buildings, all of which would have provided additional beds for 1,000 sick; but because of the armistice this work was disapproved.

Complete reconstruction facilities were provided in this hospital, and special facilities, including prosthetics, for the treatment of amputation cases were developed.

In April, 1918, when it was designated a base hospital, the capacity was 300. With some additional permanent post buildings and new construction the capacity rose to 1,150 by June. In August it was increased to a maximum of 1,500. A trivial number of sick was cared for in this hospital at the time the above designation was made, but the number soon rose to 500, where it remained until September 25, 1918. It now became a general hospital and was put to good use, for, by November 15, it was filled with over 1,400 sick. The number ran along between about 1,200 and 1,800 until May, 1919, when a decline began, and by October of that year only 673 sick were in the hospital.65

On September 8, 1919, the Surgeon General recommended the discontinuance of this general hospital, and its reversion to a post hospital, effective October 15.66 This recommendation was approved September 13,67 and the change was duly carried out.  


572

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 26, Fort Des Moines, Iowa,  from September 24, 1918, to October 19, 1919, inclusive


573

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 27, FORT DOUGLAS, UTAH

Fort Douglas is located in the foothills of the Wasatch Mountains, 3½ miles southeast of Salt Lake City, which it overlooks from an added elevation of 800 feet. The terrain is practically level, with a gentle sloping away from the mountains to the rear of the post. The soil is sandy, thus insuring the absence of mud following rains and a freedom from dust during the times when the winds blow.

Fort Douglas had been a permanent garrison for a regiment of Infantry and there were an excellent post hospital, barracks, officers' quarters, and other complementary buildings.

In the early summer of 1918, it appeared that this post would make a particularly desirable acquisition as a general hospital: there were no general hospital facilities, other than for the treatment of tuberculosis, in all that vast area lying between the Pacific Coast and the Central States. So, early in July an informal arrangement was made between the Surgeon General and the Director of Operations, General Staff, that the permanent buildings at Fort Douglas, except six designated structures, would be used for general hospital purposes.68

On August 3, 1918,69 the buildings were made actually available to the Medical Department. They consisted chiefly of two groups of barracks and a group of storehouses, a stable, etc. Though they, in themselves, would not make a large hospital, it was thought they would do very well as a beginning in this geographical region; and obtaining them marked the beginning of what was designated by the War Department, September 21, General Hospital No. 27.70

In the meantime, a commanding officer for the general hospital to be developed was ordered to take command. To start the project his original instructions were to submit at once a comprehensive but moderate estimate of funds necessary to renovate and occupy the existing buildings, which had been turned over, and to contemplate only minor alterations, and no new construction if it could possibly be avoided; the probability of future extension by new construction was pointed out and present action was not to interfere with that eventuality. The Secretary of War had stated that no additional space would be given this hospital until the buildings already made available were full of sick.

Estimates were then submitted for the adaptation of the existing buildings and for the construction of 14 new buildings. The new construction was greatly reduced and the following was authorized on October 14 by the Secretary of War: The construction of two temporary barracks and one general mess and kitchen; alterations and repairs covering the inclosing of porches in temporary wards; necessary heating equipment, plumbing fixtures, repairs, etc., for the existing barrack buildings; alterations to furnish quarters and a mess for officers; and screening, painting, calcimining, and miscellaneous general repairs.71 In due time this work was begun but it was never completed: with the demobilization of troops and the abandonment of portions of the cantonments following the armistice there was found to be sufficient hospital space to obviate the necessity for completing this work. The effect of these events was not felt at once, but in February, 1919, the work was stopped. This


574

hospital, though organized on the basis of a large hospital and prepared for expansion, never emerged from the small hospital class nor exceeded 500 beds in capacity. The total cost was $284,479.

On June 18, 1919, it was felt that General Hospital No. 27 could be dispensed with by the first of the following August. Its discontinuance was recommended to the Secretary of War, who approved it two days later.72 By July 15,73 however, it was found to be impracticable to close the hospital, by reason of the lack of sufficient beds properly located elsewhere to permit of a comfortable and orderly transfer of the sick; therefore, its discontinuance was deferred until September l, on which date it was closed and a reduced post hospital reestablished in its stead.74

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 27, Fort Douglas, Utah, from September 25, 1918, to September 1, 1919, inclusive


574

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 28, FORT SHERIDAN, ILL.

Fort Sheridan had been abandoned practically since 1913. Almost the entire garrison had in that year been sent to the Mexican border, and the largest number of troops stationed at the post from that time until the spring of 1917 was one squadron of Cavalry. The general upkeep of the large and well­appointed reservation naturally suffered, and the buildings and grounds became somewhat shabby from lack of proper care.

Shortly after the war began an officers' training camp, containing approximately 5,000 candidates, was established at this post. The old post hospital, which had been partially closed, was reopened, completely and thoroughly cleaned, but very little money was spent upon it. Four separate wards, connected by covered porches and heated by a separate plant, were built to the west of the hospital. These wards were temporary buildings, lined with beaver board, and they were to be used for the normal expansion anticipated in a garrison of that size.

In making provisions for the large number of wounded who were expected to begin arriving from France in the fall of 1918, it was decided in the Surgeon General's Office that Fort Sheridan was excellently located for the establishment there of a large general hospital. Steps were taken providing for the turning over of most of the post of Fort Sheridan to the Medical Department, to be used as a nucleus for this general hospital.75 Plans were made for the erection of a large number of temporary buildings for wards, etc.,76 with the intention of giving the hospital a capacity in round numbers of 5,000 beds. The Medical Department assumed control September 21, 1918 , of that part of the post which had been transferred to it. Construction work for the remodeling of the old buildings and the erection of the new was begun October 2, 1918. At first the organization of the hospital was not planned carefully, and for several months it was only an expansion of the post organization which had been in existence since the beginning of the war. Patients from overseas began to arrive at the hospital November 17, 1918, and by January 1, 1919, there were 1,241 under treatment.77

A number of old stables on the post were remodeled to be used as barracks for the detachment, Medical Department, on duty at this hospital;78 but they were not completed until March, 1919, and the men were, naturally, very uncomfortable until the proper changes had been made. These detachment men were compelled also to eat in the already crowded mess halls78 of the hospital until February 5, 1919, when the detachment kitchen and mess hall had been completed.

The nurses and officers were accommodated in the officers' quarters79 and were fairly comfortable from the beginning, though crowded to a certain extent. The nurses' mess was established in the old officers' club, and the commanding officer's residence was remodeled into a duty officers' mess.

The educational department was established in January, 1919, in one of the Cavalry barracks, which had been remodeled for the purpose.80 The physiotherapy department was established in a small ward in one of the permanent buildings until the temporary buildings were constructed, when it was moved to the first floor of building No. 129 and there, completely established with every convenience, became a well administered department.  


576

FIG. 186


577

General Hospital No. 28 became the largest general hospital provided in the United States during the war. It consisted of practically all of the permanent buildings of Fort Sheridan and 27 new two-story frame buildings, erected upon the parade ground, and all connected by corridors.

The first wards to be occupied were those established in the permanent buildings, in addition to the post hospital and its outlying wards. On February 19, 1919 , the first of the temporary wards was occupied, and in April, 1919, the last remaining ward building was completed and occupied.

The hospital, as finally organized, and with practically its full capacity in use, was arranged in such a way that the administrative features were handled to promote simplicity and efficiency. By reference to Figure 186, it can be seen that this hospital, with a capacity of 4,800 patients, covered less ground than the average base hospital in a cantonment, the capacity of which was about 2,000. Division of the hospital into sections was carefully made so as to group special classes of cases together, not only tending to promote better administrative control but the simplification of professional treatment.

The hospital, during January of 1919, averaged about 1,000 patients.77 This number increased gradually until June, at which time there were 4,987 patients.77 From then until the first of September the increase was very rapid, and on August 1, 1919, there were 5,295 patients in the hospital.77 This was the largest number cared for at one time, and throughout the following fall the reduction in number was rapid and steady. In November there was a considerable increase in the number of patients, caused by the sending home from France of a large number of genitourinary patients who had been held in detention there.  Altogether 1,200 such patients were received.

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 28, Fort Sheridan, Ill., from September 24, 1918, to December 1919, inclusive


578

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 29, FORT SNELLING, MINN.

Fort Snelling is situated 1 mile southeast of Minneapolis, a city of approximately 364,000 inhabitants, and immediately across the Mississippi River from St. Paul, a city of 292,000 inhabitants, and the State capital.

The military reservation is a tract of land about 2,000 acres in extent, extending from the point of confluence of the Mississippi and Minnesota Rivers in a general southwesterly direction between the two rivers. The part of the reservation occupied by the buildings of the post and hospital is a high plateau, 790 feet above sea level, bounded on two sides by steep declivities extending down to the two rivers, and strongly fortified by nature. The plateau is beautifully wooded, as are the bottom lands beyond, which were cut by many natural ravines.

The soil of the greater part of the reservation is a light sandy loam, shading into a richer loam to the southwest. The edges of the cliff at the promontory show a deep subsoil of clay, gravel, and soft sandstone. Although there was a considerable amount of sand in the surface soil, the paving of the roads and the vegetation prevented the flying of much dust in dry weather and the carrying of any considerable amount of mud after rains.  


579

The climate of the region was found to be temperate, with the exception that there was usually some rigorous weather in the middle of the winter. This, however, did not extend over periods of any considerable length of time. The hospital site was well protected against the wind on three sides, but was exposed on the west.

The main road through the post was tarvia-macadam, the other roads being of dirt and gravel, rolled down, which were very well kept up. The grounds were bordered on the north by the Mississippi River and on the east and south by the Minnesota River.

Fort Snelling was included in the list of posts for which the Surgeon General made request in June, 1917, that they might be used as general hospitals;81 but on October 15, 1917,82 the Secretary of War placed Fort Snelling at the disposal of the department commander for use as Infantry winter quarters, thus eliminating it from possible use by the Medical Department.

The Surgeon General reiterated his request to the Secretary of War on November 7, 1917;83 but, in view of the fact that accommodations for 25,000 sick had already been provided elsewhere, this latest request was disapproved.

In the following summer, August 12, 1918,84 the department commander turned the post over to the post surgeon for hospital use; and in September, the extemporaneous use of the post buildings, which included three temporary wards and a mess hall and kitchen that had been added to the post hospital in June, 1917, permitted the provision of space for 500 beds. At this time a plan was recommended looking to the complete adaptation of the post for general hospital purposes. This was the first real step toward the enlargement of the hospital and the provision of additional general hospital space, so much needed. The plan included85 the glazing of porches on six double barracks, and their connection with glass-inclosed corridors; the installation of necessary toilet facilities and ward accessories on the first and second floors of all barracks; the erection of a general kitchen and mess hall and its connection with a chain of renovated barracks; the construction of a kitchen and mess hall for the hospital attendants; the alteration of quarters and the provision of messing facilities, for nurses; and other necessary general utilities and miscellaneous improvements and alterations. On September 21, 1918, the hospital was designated "General Hospital No. 29."86

The work of adaptation was delayed somewhat. Unfortunately, the winter was near at hand and the severe weather added difficulties; nevertheless, the construction work was pushed throughout the winter, alterations were installed, the new buildings erected, and a capacity of 1,100 was secured.

In September, 1918, the hospital contained 250 beds and 51 sick. In October, both the capacity of the hospital and the number of sick had increased to over 1,500, only to fall again in November. In December, the number of sick increased and, coincidently, the capacity of the hospital, now being enlarged by alteration and construction. In January, 1919, the maximum number of beds, 1,100, was available, and 900 sick were under treatment. From this time until June the sick varied between 900 and 1,100.87

In addition to general medical and surgical work, special care for the following kinds of cases was provided: Amputations, orthopedic conditions,  


580     

injuries to the peripheral nerves, skull, brain, and cord; organic diseases of the nervous system, mental defects, drug addicts, inebriates, and epileptics. Provisions for full physical reconstruction activities were also made.

On June 6, it was apparent that this hospital would be abandoned in the late summer, and accordingly the commanding officer was given advance information to this effect.88 On June 18,1919, the Surgeon General recommended to the Secretary of War that the hospital be discontinued on August 1;89 and, the Secretary of War's approval being given two days later, appropriate steps were taken to accomplish the work. On August 1 this institution was discontinued and normal post work for a battalion was resumed in the original post hospital.90

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 29, Fort Snelling, Minn., from September 21, 1918, to August 8, 1919, inclusive


581

REFERENCES

(1) Letter from the officer in charge of cantonment construction to Surgeon General, March 15, 1918. Subject: 1,000-bed tuberculosis hospital for Azalea, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 19) K.

(2) Letter from Chief Real Estate Section, Purchase, Storage, and Traffic Division, General Staff, to the Surgeon General, November 25, 1918. Subject: Purchase of 404 acres of land upon which General Hospital No. 19, Azalea, N. C., is located. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Azalea, N. C.) S.

(3) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, for the officer in charge of cantonment construction, March 16, 1918. Subject: Plans for 1,000-bed hospital to be constructed at Azalea, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 19) K. 

(4) Telegram from Gorgas to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 19, Azalea, N. C., July 29, 1918. Subject: Authority to enlarge hospital by 500 beds. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 600.4 (Gen. Hosp. No. 19) K.

(5) Shown on plans of General Hospital No. 19. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O.

(6) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 19, at Oteen (Azalea), N. C., on December 9, 1918, by Col. J. B. Clayton, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 19) K.

(7) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 19, to the Surgeon General, December 13, 1918. Subject: Recommendations relating to additions to this hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 19) K.

(8) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, March 25, 1919. Subject: Change of status, General Hospital No. 19. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 19) K.

(9) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, May 25, 1918. Subject: Designation of hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosps.) K. 

(10) Shown on weekly reports compiled in the Surgeon General's Office. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(11) Letter from Col. W. F. Lewis, M. C., to the Surgeon General, May 16, 1918. Subject: Sanitary inspection, Whipple Barracks, Ariz. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (Gen. Hosp. No. 20 inspection reports).

(12) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, February 6, 1918. Subject: Use of Whipple Barracks by Medical Department for tuberculosis purposes. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.2 (Whipple Barracks, Ariz.) N.

(13) Letter from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, Southern Department, February 15, 1918. Subject: Assigning Whipple Barracks to the Medical Corps. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Whipple Barracks, Ariz.) N.  


582

(14) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, May 25, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospital) K.

(15) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Construction Division, War Department, July 5, 1918. Subject: Additional hospital buildings, General Hospital No. 20. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 20) K.

(16) Telegram from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 20, to the Surgeon General, June 19, 1918. Subject: Hospital accommodations. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 20) K.

(17) Shown on weekly bed report. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(18) Memorandum from Assistant Chief of Staff, Director of Operations, to the Assistant Secretary of War, January 6, 1919. Subject: Army hospital for city of Philadelphia. Approval of Assistant Secretary of War indorsed thereon. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 22) K.

(19) Copy of resolution. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 22) K.

(20) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 22 at Philadelphia, Pa., April 4-5, 1919, by Col. E. R. Schreiner, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 22) K.

(21) Letter from Surgeon General to Director Purchase, Storage, and Traffic, General Staff, May 28, 1919. Subject: Closing of General Hospital No. 22, Philadelphia, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 22) K.

(22) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, June 5, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 22, Philadelphia, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 22) K.

(23) Telegram from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 22, Philadelphia, Pa., to the Surgeon General, July 1, 1919. Subject: Report of closing. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 22) K.

(24) Letter from Capt. E. J. Tucker, Sanitary Corps, to Lieut. Col. Wm. C. Hoad, Sanitary Corps, September 24, 1918. Subject: Report on water supply, General Hospital No. 23, Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 671 (Gen. Hosp. No. 23) K.

(25) Letter from the Acting Secretary of Labor to the honorable the Secretary of War. April 23, 1918. Subject: Internment camp at Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Hot Springs, N. C.) S.

(26) Letter from Lieut. Col. Wm. A. Smith, At. C., to the Surgeon General, May 8, 1914. Subject: Inspection of internment camp, Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record loom, S. G. O., 601 (Hot Springs, N. C.) S.

(27) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, May 22, 1918. Subject: Renewal of lease on internment camp at Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Hot Springs, N. C.) S.

(28) Copy of lease. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Hot Springs, N. C.) F.

(29) Letter from the Chief of Construction Division to the Surgeon General, December 4, 1918. Subject: Water supply for General Hospital No. 23, Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 23) K.

(30) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 23, to the Surgeon General, January 30, 1919. Subject: Request information as to policy determined for this hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 23) K.

(31) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(32) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Director of Operations, Office of the Chief of Staff, January 31, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of lease, General Hospital No. 23, Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 23) K.

(33) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, February 10, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 23, Hot Springs, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 23) K.

(34) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 23, Hot Springs, N. C., to the Surgeon General, March 15, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 23. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 23) K.

(35) Letter from county commissioners of Allehgeny County, Pa., to the Surgeon General, April 8, 1918. Subject: Rental of North Side Home, Hoboken, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (North Side Home, Hoboken, Pa.) S.  


583

(36) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, April 15, 1918. Subject: General Hospital at Pittsburgh, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (North Side Home, Hoboken, Pa.) S.

(37) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, May 4, 1918. Subject: Approval of Secretary of War of lease of North Side Home, Hoboken, Pa., dated May 3, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (North Side Home, Hoboken, Pa.) S. 

(38) Second indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, August 26, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 24) K.

(39) Shown on weekly bed report. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(40) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 24, to the Surgeon General, August 2, 1918. Subject: Closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 24) K.

(41) Report from Maj. E. L. Ruffner, M. C., to the Surgeon General, May 12, 1917. Subject: Report on use of Fort Benjamin Harrison as a general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 174571-11 (Old Files).

(42) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 18, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks of certain posts for hospital purposes. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(43) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 23, 1917. Subject: Authority for use of barracks at Forts McPherson, Oglethorpe, and Benjamin Harrison for base hospitals. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2604162 (Old Files Section). And: Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, November 7, 1917.  Subject: Use of posts as general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.3 (General).

(44) Letter from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, Central Department, June 23, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks at certain posts for general or base hospital accommodations in connection with post hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(45) Telegram from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, Central Department, October 15, 1917. Subject: Use of certain posts as winter quarters. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(46) Letter from the Surgeon General to the department surgeon, Central Department, June 30, 1917. Subject: Plans for base hospitals at certain posts. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(47) Second indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, September 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of certain general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp.) K.

(48) Third indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the commanding general, Central Department, October 26, 1918. Subject: Transfer of buildings at Fort Benjamin Harrison to the Medical Department. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 25) K.

(49) Letter from the Surgeon General to Capt. H. W. Cutler, Sanitary Corps, October 19, 1918. Subject: Construction program General Hospital No. 25. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 25) K.

(50) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(51) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, August 4, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 25. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 25) K.

(52) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, August 8, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 25 approved. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 25) K.

(53) General Order No. 17, Headquarters, General Hospital No. 25, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., August 31, 1919. Copy on file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.72-3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 25) K.

(54) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, July 2, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent buildings for hospital purposes. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 632 (Misc. sec.) 

(55) Telegram from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, Central Department, July 3, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent buildings at Fort Des Moines for base or general hospital purposes authorized. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(56) Telegram from the Surgeon General to the department surgeon, Central Department, July 3, 1917. Subject: Plans for base hospital at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).  


584

(57) First indorsement from the Surgeon General to the officer in charge of cantonment construction, Quartermaster Department, September 11, 1917. Subject: Conversion and construction of buildings at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796-134 (Old Files).

(58) Telegram from The Adjutant General to commanding general, Central Department, October 15, 1918. Subject: Use of certain posts. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files). 

(59) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, November 7, 1917. Subject: Use of posts as general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.3 (General).

(60) Memorandum from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, January 4, 1918. Subject: Hospital at Fort Des Moines, Iowa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Hospital, Ft. Des Moines) C.

(61) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 14, 1918. Subject: General hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (General).

(62) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 31, 1918. Subject: Request that Fort Des Moines be designated a general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 26) K.

(63) Letter from the Acting Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, September 11, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(64) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, September 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(65) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 U.

(66) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, September 8, 1919. Subject: Discontinuance of General Hospital No. 26. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.1-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 26) K.

(67) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, September 13, 1919. Subject: Discontinuance of General Hospital No. 26, Fort Des Moines, Iowa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.72-3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 26) K.

(68) Letter from Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, July 12, 1918. Subject: Permanent buildings for use of Medical Department at Fort Douglas, Utah. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.2 (Ft. Douglas) N.

(69) Third indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to Surgeon General, August 3, 1918. Subject: Permanent buildings at Fort Douglas, Utah, assigned to Medical Department. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.2 (Ft. Douglas) N.

(70) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, September 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(71) Letter from Chief of Construction Division to the Surgeon General, October 26, 1918. Subject: Construction authorized at Fort Douglas, Utah. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Gen. Hosp. No. 27) K.

(72) Letter from Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, June 18, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 27, Fort Douglas, Utah. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 27) K.

(73) Letter from the Surgeon General to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 27, July 15, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.1-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 27) K.

(74) Telegram from Foster, Fort Douglas, Utah, to the Surgeon General, September 3, 1919. Subject: Closing of General Hospital No. 27. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.72-3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 27) K.

(75) Letter from The Adjutant General to commanding general Central Department, August 7, 1918. Subject: Assignment for the use of the Medical Department of permanent post at Fort Sheridan, and Fort Benjamin Harrison. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 28) K.

(76) Letter from the Surgeon General to Construction Division, War Department, September 7, 1918. Subject: Hospital construction at Fort Sheridan, Ill. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Ft. Sheridan) N.

(77) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 U.  


585

(78) Report of special sanitary inspection, General Hospital No. 28, Fort Sheridan, Ill., made by Lieut. Col. H. B. McIntyre, M. C., December 17, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 28) K.

(79) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 28, Fort Sheridan, Ill., March 7, 1919, by Col. W. P. Chamberlain, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No 28) K.

(80) Letter from chief educational officer, General Hospital No. 28, to the Surgeon General, April 22, 1919. Subject: Sketch of educational service. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 353.91-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 28) K.

(81) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 18, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks of certain Army posts for hospital purposes. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (General).

(82) Telegram from The Adjutant General to commanding general, Central Department, October 15, 1917. Subject: Use of certain posts. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files). 

(83) Letter from Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, November 7, 1917. Subject: Use of posts as general hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 680.3 (General).

(84) Letter from commanding officer, U. S. Army Hospital, Fort Snelling, Minn., to the Surgeon General, August 14, 1918. Subject: Transfer of post to Medical Department. On file Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Ft. Snelling) N.

(85) Letter from Chief of Construction Division to the Surgeon General, November 1, 1918. Subject: Fort Snelling, Minn., project. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Ft. Snelling) N. 

(86) First indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to Surgeon General, September 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of general hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospital) K.

(87) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 U.

(88) Telegram from the Surgeon General to the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 29, Fort Snelling, Minn., June 6, 1919. Subject: Closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 29) K.

(89) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, June 18, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 29, Fort Snelling, Minn. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 29) K.

(90) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 29, to the Surgeon General, August 4, 1919. Subject: Closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 29) K.

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