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Chapter XXVI

Contents

CHAPTER XXVI

GENERAL HOSPITALS, NOS. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, AND 18

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 9, LAKEWOOD, N. J.

The Lakewood Hotel, which was the nucleus of General Hospital No. 9, was situated at Lakewood, N. J., 69 miles southeast of New York City. It was in the pine region and winter resort section of the State, and was easily accessible to both New York City and Philadelphia by means of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The hotel was leased from the Resort Hotel Co. in January, 1918, for $50,000 per year.1

The soil was sandy, the terrain gently rolling, affording excellent natural drainage.2

FIG. 173.-Genera1 Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J.

To augment the bed capacity of the hospital, additional neighboring properties were subsequently leased. These were the Florence-in-the-Pines Hotel, the Aeolian Building, and an adjacent small tract of unimproved land.1

The Lakewood Hotel, the largest of the leased properties, was a five-story building of brick exterior, but of otherwise nonfireproof construction. Its design was attractive, in the shape of the letter U, the arms of which pointed to the south. Its first floor, with extensions rearward, contained the lobby, dining rooms, kitchen, billiard rooms, etc., and porches by which it was completely surrounded.3

The area of the first floor was 86,000 square feet, that of each of the floors above, 40,000 square feet; and there were, in all, 500 rooms.3 The lease of this property covered not only the grounds, but all buildings, furniture, linen, silverware, dishes, etc.1

The Florence-in-the-Pines Hotel was a three-story frame building, much smaller in size than was the Lakewood Hotel; and in its lease, there were also included all buildings, furniture, linen, silverware, dishes, etc.4


521

The Lakewood Hotel was used as the hospital proper;2 the Florence-in­the-Pines Hotel was utilized as quarters for nurses on duty at the hospital;4 and the Aeolian Building was converted into a garage and storehouse.5 On the unimproved tract of land temporary buildings were constructed to afford additional bedspace.3

On January 4, 1918, a small detachment of Medical Department personnel arrived at the Lakewood Hotel; and on January 10, it was formally taken over by the War Department.5 By February 1, when it was officially designated General Hospital No. 9,6 it had been placed in a reasonably satisfactory degree of readiness to receive a limited number of patients, the first of which, however, did not arrive until February 14, when 139 cases of scarlet fever were received, by transfer, from the hospital at Camp Merritt.5

The principal construction project entered into, in order to physically balance the hospital, comprised five two-story ward barracks, the addition of considerable kitchen equipment, and a heating plant to heat the newly constructed buildings as well as to augment the inadequate heating plant of the Lakewood Hotel building.7 The total cost of this construction work was about $180,000. Much other construction and repair work, not included in the above statement, was done from time to time, which comprised screening, sanitary flooring, resetting of boilers in the hotel heating plant, improvement in the plumbing, the installation of operating rooms, physical reconstruction, and other special facilities. Prior to the completion of this work, the capacity of the hospital was 650 beds, but with the additional beds the capacity of the hospital was augmented to 1,000.1

General Hospital No. 9 was not a special hospital in any sense, the major portion of the patients treated being general medical and surgical cases, though it was designated to receive arthritis and orthopedic cases, and, on June 6, 1918, was made a center for cardiovascular diseases.8 Its use as a general hospital was discontinued on May 31, 1919.

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J., from February 4, 1918, to May 31, 1919, inclusive


522

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 10, BOSTON, MASS.

General Hospital No. 10 was located in the city of Boston, Mass., and comprised two groups of buildings, and a separate building used for quarters and storage purposes. Of the two main groups, one was situated on Parker Hill in Boston and comprised the Robert Bent Brigham Hospital, which was leased by the Government from the trustees of that institution; a hospital especially constructed by the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, as a reconstruction hospital for the use of the War Department; and the Massachusetts Woman's Hospital, a short distance from the other buildings, but likewise on Parker Hill, which was leased from the trustees of that institution for use as nurses' quarters. The second group of buildings comprised the whole of the west department of the Boston City Hospital, situated in the suburb of West Roxbury, which was leased by the War Department from the city of Boston. In addition to these two groups of hospital buildings, a single large, two-storied barracks was leased from the Wentworth Institute of Boston. This barrack building had been erected for the use of student officers of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps. Its lower story was used by the hospital for the storage of supplies and the upper floor as quarters for the detachment, Medical Department. The two main groups, on Parker Hill and in West Roxbury, respectively, were separated by approximately 7 miles; the barracks at the Wentworth Institute was three-quarters of a mile from the summit of Parker Hill.9


523

The Robert Bent Brigham Hospital, with its equipment, drugs, and fixtures, was leased from the trustees at $55,000 per year.10 Its bed capacity was 200. Immediately adjoining it, and on the same hill, commanding a beautiful view of the city, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks contemplated erecting a 250-bed hospital, the use of which they had tendered the Government. This offer was made in March of 1918 and was accepted by the War Department on the 26th of that month at a nominal lease of $1 per year.11 At that time, however, the hospital had not been built; but representatives from the Elks, in consultation with officers of the Surgeon General's Office, obtained requirements and suggestions, and, proceeding upon this, they constructed the hospital, which was completed in the following December.

These two institutions, the Robert Bent Brigham Hospital and Elks' Hospital, formed the backbone of General Hospital No. 10. The Massachusetts Woman's Hospital, leased from the Woman's Charity Club at $2,500 per year,10 and the Wentworth Barracks, leased from the Wentworth Institute at $1 per

FIG. 174.-Portion of General Hospital No 10, Boston

year,10 the former for nurses and the latter for enlisted men and storage, completed the group of buildings in the city proper. The west department of the Boston City Hospital, tendered to the Government and leased at $1 per year,12 from the city of Boston, had a capacity of 300 and was intended as a convalescent department of this general hospital.

Leases on the Robert Bent Brigham property,10 the Woman's Hospital,10 and the West Roxbury property12 became effective on October 1, 1918, and occupancy was assumed soon thereafter. The hospital as a whole was opened for patients in December, 1918, although the Elks' Hospital, not being completed until that month, was not utilized until January, 1919. The convalescent department at West Roxbury was opened at about the same time as the Elks' Hospital.13

The Robert Bent Brigham Hospital consisted of six three-story brick and stone buildings of modern design, and was fully equipped.10 The Elks' Hospital,  


524

of semipermanent two-story pavilion type construction, consisted of one large main building with three wings, and three additional buildings in the rear, and was connected to the Robert Bent Brigham Hospital by corridor and tunnel,10 the latter carrying the heating mains from the central heating plant in the Robert Brigham Hospital. The west department of the Boston City Hospital, consisting of 14 buildings of mixed character of construction, was beautifully situated and well adapted to the care of convalescents.14

The construction and alteration work done in connection with the establishment of this hospital consisted principally of corridor construction, connecting certain buildings in the west department and the installation, in that group, of messing facilities. Little alteration or addition was required in the group in the city. The total cost of this work was $46,000. The original authorized capacity was 900 beds, but this was later reduced to 700 beds.15

The hospital opened in December of 1918, and by February, 1919, 500 sick were being constantly cared for. It remained at this level for about one month, when the number rapidly increased to 800, near which it remained until May of that year.16

On May 28, 1919, the Surgeon General recommended the cancellation of all leases and the abandonment of the hospital, effective June 15, 1919.17 Prior to the latter date the comparatively few patients requiring further treatment were sent to other general hospitals.18

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 10, Boston, Mass., from October, 1918, to June 17, 1919, inclusive


525

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 11, CAPE MAY, N. J.

The Hotel Cape May was located on the Ocean Drive, at the eastern end of the city, and within 100 feet of the beach of the Atlantic Ocean. It was a large H-shaped, eight-story building of brick and stone construction, and contained 338 rooms,19 125 fresh and salt water baths, two large lobbies, spacious dining rooms, kitchen, and storage facilities. To its rear, and component parts of the property, were a brick boiler house, a garage, and a laundry building.19 The laundry was a three-story frame building, on the first floor of which there was a complete equipment for laundry work; and on the second and third floors were rooms which had been used as quarters for the hotel employees. Still farther removed to the rear, and also belonging to the hotel property, were 20 cottages, and several vacant lots.19

The hotel had its separate sewerage system,19 which discharged into Delaware Bay; and its own lighting system,19 the energy of which was obtained from the central heating plant. Its water supply was that of the city of Cape May, which was obtained from artesian wells.20

The soil was very sandy, leaving no subsequent traces of rain, and there was, in consequence, no mud problem with which to deal. The seasons of the year were well tempered by the adjacent ocean, so that during the summer there were few hot days, with the nights always cool, and during the winter, moderate weather, with high winds only in March and April.

The roads about the place were constructed principally of gravel and were maintained in an excellent condition.20

The general sanitary condition of the neighborhood was satisfactory; the hotel was quite separate from the city proper; and there was no marsh land near by, though in summer the far-famed Jersey mosquitoes abounded in great numbers.

On December 18, 1917, the Surgeon General recommended that the War Department authorize the leasing of the Cape May Hotel for use as a general hospital.21 This property had been offered by the Cape May Hotel Co. at a rental of $99,000 yearly,22 and it had been investigated by representatives of the Surgeon General's Office. The lease was approved by the Secretary of  


526

War, and was executed by the Quartermaster General's Office, January 15, 1918, to be effective on January 20, at the yearly rate quoted.23

The hotel had not been occupied for a year or two, and had been greatly neglected. The pipes of the water and heating systems throughout the main building were in bad condition; many of them had become broken, due to the settling of the walls; and having been incased in the walls, the resultant leaks had caused unsightly discolorations, and dampness in many parts of the building. These defects were difficultly located and repaired, many in fact not being discoverable until after the building had been put into use.

The work of alteration and repair comprised principally the correction of the defects in plumbing, though adequate measures in this regard were not instituted at the time the control of the building was assured by the War Department. There had been considerable expression of objection, outside the War Department, to what was claimed to be an excessive rental agreed to in

FIG. 175.-General Hospital No. 11, Cape May, N. J.

the lease. Based on these statements was the War Department's conclusion to discontinue the lease of the property on June 30, 1918, though the Inspector General's Office had reported the hotel as being well suited for hospital purposes, recommending at the same time, however, that it be obtained for a rental of not over $60,000.19 Throughout the controversial period, the Surgeon General's Office had maintained that $99,000 was not considered an excessive amount. Ultimately, the owners of the hotel agreed to an annual rental of $50,000, for any time it might be used after June 30, 1918; and the War Department reversed its decision not to make further use of the property, approving, on August 7, 1918, a renewal of the lease, at $50,000 a year, effective July 1, 1918.24

Because of the condition of uncertainty, which lasted until August 7, as to what the final status of the hotel would be, in so far as the War Department's use of it was concerned, progressive activity in the hospital was at a standstill, and comparatively few patients were admitted. In the fall of 1918, however, work on the needed repairs and alterations was resumed.


527

Opened first as General Hospital No. 16, the designation was changed to General Hospital No. 11, March 14, 1918.25 The hotel building was used practically exclusively for patients, and its authorized bed capacity was 750. Of the 20 cottages, 5 were used as isolation wards, and the remainder for quarters for officers, nurses, and reconstruction aides.19 The enlisted personnel were quartered in tents which were located to the rear of the laundry building.20

After the definite status of the hospital had been established, its number of patients was increased, and by October, 1918, 600 sick were under treatment.26 During the months following, until July, 1919, the number of patients varied from 500 to 690.26 In addition to a large number of general medical and surgical cases, this hospital cared for the following special types of cases: Deafness, eye, ear, nose, and throat diseases, maxillofacial injuries, organic diseases of the nervous system, peripheral nerve injuries, speech defects (not neurotic), and wounds or injuries of the skull or brain and spinal cord.

On July 20, 1919, due to the fact that the inflow of sick and wounded from the American Expeditionary Forces had practically ceased, and that the Medical Department now possessed sufficient facilities or Government owned property to adequately care for the sick of the Army, General Hospital No. 11 was abandoned, and all activities under Medical Department control were removed.27 The lease, however, could not be terminated at this time, and the payment of rental until August 23, 1919, was essential to afford adequate time for the removal of all Government property.28

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 11, Cape May, N. J., from February, 1918, to August 4, 1919, inclusive


528

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 12, BILTMORE, N. C.

At Biltmore, N. C., on the site of the old Kenilworth Inn, which was destroyed by fire in 1908, there was being erected, in the fall of 1917, a new structure, the design of which was that of a modern, high-class, resort hotel. On December 20, 1917, the Surgeon General recommended that this building be leased from the Kenilworth Co. at $115,000 per year for the first year of governmental occupancy, and at $75,000 rental for each succeeding year.29 The recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War on January 2, 1918, and the control of the property was assumed by the Medical Department.30

The inn was located in Buncombe County, about 2 miles from the business center of Asheville, a town with an estimated permanent population of 35,000, though, because of its international popularity as a health resort, there was frequently an increase of its population to 150,000.

The Asheville plateau upon which Kenilworth was situated, is a circular plateau, comprising 2,000,000 acres, the perimeter of which is a complete circle of mountain peaks. The rolling hills, generous plateaus, and wide valleys of  


529

the locality afforded an ideal place at which to locate a hospital. The soil was composed principally of a sandy loam with, here and there, outcroppings of light gravel, which obviated the possibility of flying dust. The average mean temperature, as observed, was 35°; and the air was dry and invigorating.

The city of Asheville had 45 miles of paved streets, all connecting with the roads which led to Kenilworth. The roads through Kenilworth connected with Biltmore Avenue at the west entrance, and with Swannanoa River Road at the south entrance. Both of these roads were of concrete.

Surrounding the Kenilworth Inn was a tract of land, 15 acres in extent, belonging to the hotel company, on which was located a group of dwellings. These were particularly desirable as adjuncts to the hotel, since they had been placed upon the same knoll as had the inn. Authority was therefore obtained to lease some of them-five cottages, a two-story residence, and a building,

FIG. 176.-General Hospital No. 12, Biltmore, N. C.

called the All Souls' Crescent-for officers' quarters, and three dwellings for quarters for nurses.

Two buildings in Biltmore were leased; one of them, adjacent to the railroad station, for receiving, storing, and issuing supplies; the other, two blocks distant, for quarters for the personnel of the Quartermaster Corps on duty at the hospital.

The main hotel building, a splendid five-story structure, roughly T-shaped in design, faced south, overlooking a mountainous country of great beauty. It was built of hollow tile and cement and was considered fireproof. It had many features which made it highly desirable for a hospital, among which were an excellent water supply, an adequate sewerage system, an independent electric-light plant, freight and passenger elevators, and broad and attractive verandas especially well adapted for the care of the sick. Immediately adjacent to the building there was sufficient room for the erection of an adequate number of temporary buildings for expansion.31


530

Little construction or alteration work was done at this place, the majority being accomplished in the spring and summer of 1918. It consisted of installation of cooking equipment, inclosing verandas, installing temporary partitions, painting, and other minor details incident to the completion of the construction to suit Government needs rather than those of the hotel company. The total cost of this work was $30,000.

It was designated a general hospital March 14, 1918,32 and was opened for sick in the following May.33 In the basement a laboratory, dispensary, mess hall for the detachment, Medical Department, the steam heating plant, Young Men's Christian Association, various offices, etc., were located.34 On the first floor, in addition to the offices for the administrative work of the hospital, one of the largest wards, 52 beds, was located. This was to have been the hotel parlor, and it was a very light, spacious, and attractive room. On this floor some smaller wards and the dining rooms for patients and officers were also located.34 The second, third, and fourth floors were practically similar, and there the majority of space was divided into small wards of one, two, and three beds each.34 A noteworthy feature of the hospital was the spacious verandas which surrounded a large part of the first floor.34

The actual capacity of the hospital proved to be 450 beds, and in this respect it did not meet the expectations of those who made the preliminary surveys.    It was opened for sick in May, 1918, with a capacity of 200 beds,35 and by June the maximum capacity, 450 beds, had been provided.36 By July the number of sick receiving treatment had reached 400, at which point it remained until November, when it suddenly dropped to 250, and then fluctuated between this point and 400 until August, 1919.37

Although surgical facilities were provided, little surgery was done until 1919, at which time a considerable number of empyema cases was concentrated here, and from then on surgical work was confined to the treatment of empyemas.

On September 1, 1919, the hospital was closed38 on the recommendation of the Surgeon General, which had been made May 28,39 and approved by War Department June 6;40 and in conformity with the act of Congress, March 3, 1919, it was transferred to the United States Public Health Service.41


531

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 12, Biltmore, N. C., from April, 1918, to August 31, 1919, inclusive

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 13, DANSVILLE, N. Y.

On December 20, 1917, the Surgeon General requested the authority of the War Department to lease, for hospital purposes, the Jackson Sanatorium at Dansville, N. Y., with all its furniture and equipment.42 This was approved on January 2, 1918,43 and a lease was executed on the 18th of that month to be effective on February 1. The yearly rental was $49,880.44


532

The property consisted of one main building, a large four-story brick structure, and a number of smaller ones.45 The main building was intended for the hospital proper and the other buildings were to accommodate other necessary activities. Seven frame cottages, near by, were planned for quarters for medical officers; one large frame cottage was to be used for nurses, and two large frame buildings for the enlisted personnel. It was believed that the property could be operated as a 500-bed general hospital, and was designated as General Hospital No. 18, and personnel and supplies were sent there.46 Several thousand dollars were authorized for some minor repairs and alterations, and some of this money was expended in preparing the hospital for early occupancy by the sick. However, as General Hospital No. 18 it never opened for sick.

It now became apparent that the capacity of this place had been overrated and that it would not be adequate for the care of more than 200 or, at the most, 300 sick. The conviction that only large hospitals should be established now became more and more pronounced in the Surgeon General's Office, consequently, early in May, the Surgeon General recommended to the War Department that the lease on this property be canceled.47 It was evident that the hospital could not be economically operated, at least at a rental of $49,880 a year, and that the enlargement, by new construction, to a capacity of 1,000 beds was not warranted. Cancellation of the lease was promptly approved48 and the owner notified.

There appears to have been a misunderstanding between the agents of the War Department and the owner as to the intention of the Government. Although the lease terminated June 30, 1918, the president of the Sanatorium Co. stated in effect that he had been led to understand it was the War Department's agreed intention to renew the lease annually until the war was over. Negotiations were entered into anew with the owner, a new lease was agreed upon, and its approval was requested by the Surgeon General on June 29, 1918.49 The new lease, however, did not become effective until July 18, and it carried an annual rental of $20,000 instead of $49,880, and included some additional property not originally obtainable;50 otherwise it was essentially the same as the first lease.

In the meantime, the medical personnel and property had been removed to Richmond, Va., to establish there, on other leased property, a hospital for the Port of Embarkation, Newport News.51 A new organization, consisting of officers, nurses, and men, was sent to Dansville, and preparation was made anew for the opening of what, in the meantime, had become General Hospital No. 13.52 Any idea of developing here a large hospital had been given up. It was found that the place would serve admirably as a hospital for psychoneuroses and was accordingly so announced to the ports of debarkation. The total expenditure at this place did not exceed $6,000.

Though little was done in physical alteration or repair, the hospital was slow in opening. However, in November, 1918, it was ready for the reception of 275 sick; and 100 patients, afflicted with psychoneuroses, were at once sent there for treatment.53 In a few weeks the number had been increased to over 200, and the hospital continued to operate at about that capacity until March, 1919. By this time problems of the Medical Department, relating to the  


533

accommodation of the sick returning from France, had been practically solved, and it was determined to discontinue the use of this hospital, and the cancellation of all leases was recommended on March 12.54 The United States Public Health Service had expressed its desire to acquire this property, and, in accordance with the act of Congress, March 3, 1919, its transfer to that service was effected on April 21.55

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 13, Dansville, N. Y., from March, 1918, to March, 1919, inclusive


534

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 14, FORT OGLETHORPE, GA.

Prior to the war Fort Oglethorpe had been used as a permanent garrison for a regiment of cavalry. It comprised approximately 75 buildings, the major portion being of brick construction, the remainder of frame material. The buildings included a permanent post hospital, post headquarters, barracks, officers' quarters, etc., for which there were a post sewer system and a water supply, the latter having connections with the water supply of the city of Chattanooga.56

Included in the general plan of the Surgeon General to procure the buildings of permanent garrisons in their entirety for use as hospitals, a specific request was made for the use of the buildings at Fort Oglethorpe on May 18, 1917.57 Favorable action was taken by the War Department on June 23, and the Secretary of War caused a telegram to be sent to the commanding general of the Southeastern Department directing him to "make available the permanent barracks at this station for general base hospital use."58

On June 25, 1917, the Surgeon General telegraphed the surgeon, Southeastern Department, to direct the post surgeon at Fort Oglethorpe to make plans for converting the post into a general hospital and to send, by telegram, information concerning any additional temporary buildings which he might think would be needed.59 Prior to this time, the Surgeon General had authorized the construction of four temporary wards, five frame storehouses, and a frame mess hall and kitchen, to provide adjuncts to the post hospital; and, in addition, had permitted certain repairs to and alterations of the original post hospital building to improve its condition.60 A regimental infirmary had also been constructed.60 This physical expansion was to provide hospitalization facilities for the sick of the increasing number of troops then stationed at Fort Oglethorpe.

Because of its increased activities, the hospital at Fort Oglethorpe functioned somewhat as a base hospital, but it was actually administered as a post hospital, this status obtaining until July 14, 1917, when it was changed to a provisional base hospital, by General Orders, No. 23, issued from headquarters, Fort Oglethorpe, on that date.

Beginning in September, and continuing throughout the fall of 1917, authorizations for 18 temporary hospital buildings, and many smaller projects comprising alterations and repairs, were approved by the Surgeon General. During the winter 1917-18, and the following spring and summer, an equal number of additional temporary buildings, together with many small projects for improvements, were authorized.61 In all, 42 buildings were added to the post; and a maximum capacity of 2,000 beds was reached in the summer of 1918.

On November 15, 1917, the commanding general, Southeastern Department, complying with instructions which he had received from The Adjutant General's Office, changed the status of the provisional base hospital back to that for post hospital.62 The Surgeon General then endeavored to have it made a general hospital, but he was unsuccessful in his efforts until March 14, 1918, when, with over 1,200 patients under treatment, it became General Hospital No. 14.63

No specialties were accentuated at this hospital, although a complete physical reconstruction service was developed. General medical and surgical cases were treated.

On May 22, 1919, the Surgeon General recommended the discontinuance of General Hospital No. 14, and its reorganization into a post hospital.64


535

FIG 177


536

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 14, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., from March 17, 1918, to June 6, 1919, inclusive


537

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 15, CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX.

On January 25, 1918, the Surgeon General recommended that the Corpus Beach Hotel and Bathing Pavilion, at Corpus Christi, be leased for use as a hospital.65 In addition to the hotel, there were small cottages and other frame buildings, 10 in all, and 17 acres of unimproved land potentially useful for hospital expansion purposes, the whole being leased for $6,000 a year.65

It was the primary intention of the Surgeon General to have established here either a convalescent hospital,65 or a reconstruction hospital as the term was then used. But the place at best was small, and especially so when compared with other properties that were being developed or to be developed. It did have, however, the advantages of climate that could not be well disregarded in the treatment of the large number of convalescents which it was reasonable to expect from a war of first magnitude.

After the lease of the hotel had been approved and executed, the first work looking to the physical development of the hospital was authorized by the Surgeon General in March, 1918;66 and a few additional items covering alterations and repairs were authorized in the spring and summer following, but they were of a minor nature, and the cost of the whole did not exceed $3,000.

On March 21, 1918, the hospital was designated General Hospital No. 15,67 and it was opened for the reception and care of the sick on April 7, 1918,68 at a bed capacity of 100. Within a few weeks thereafter the entire property was made available for use, thus increasing its bed capacity to 215, which, without crowding, was the maximum.

The development of the hospital, beyond the potential capacity of the existing available buildings, was adversely decided upon, for the time being, and, on July 26, 1918, it was rated as a convalescent hospital only, the surgeons, ports of debarkation, being so informed in order that they would select suitable cases for transfer thereto.69 Neither reconstruction activities nor specialties were developed. The hospital soon filled, and for a part of the summer of 1918 its capacity was exceeded, but the average number of patients under treatment at the hospital was 200.70

On February 26, 1919, the abandonment of the hospital was directed by the War Department.71 Active steps were at once taken to carry this measure into effect, and on February 28 all patients requiring further treatment were transferred to the hospital at Camp Travis, Tex. While the abandonment was being effected, Congress enacted legislation which necessitated the United States Public Health Service assuming control of the hospital. There was some delay incident to the transfer of the control of the hospital, due to unfamiliarity with the requirements of the new law, but it was finally accomplished on May 31, 1919.72


538

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 15, Corpus Christi, Tex., from April, 1918, to May, 1919, inclusive


539

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 16, NEW HAVEN, CONN.

The William Wirt Winchester Memorial Tuberculosis Hospital was situated 2 miles west of New Haven, Conn., on a spur of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. It was a small hospital, which had just been completed, but it embodied modern ideas of the required facilities for the treatment of tuberculosis. It was connected with the city by macadam road and an electric railway; and the buildings, comprising a three-story administration building, an east ward, a west ward, two dormitories, a private ward, and a nurses' home, were situated on a wooded knoll which afforded a pleasant outlook on the city and the surrounding country. The buildings were of brick, colonial in design, and were connected by corridors, but were not fireproof.  The hospital had been constructed by the General Hospital Society of Connecticut

FIG. 178.-Open-air tuberculosis ward, General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn.

for the especial purpose of treating cases of tuberculosis, and was affiliated with Yale University. Its capacity was estimated as being 200 beds.73

On February 8, 1918, the Surgeon General recommended that this hospital be leased with the view to its use as a general hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis.74 His recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War on February 12, and the lease was executed on the 26th, the monetary con­sideration being $26,000 per year.75

On March 21, 1918, the hospital was designated General Hospital No. 16,76 and was opened and used, as it had been originally constructed, for the care of 200 sick. In April the 200 beds were almost fully occupied.77

At this time there was great need for increasing the total number of available beds for the tuberculous, and it was decided to enlarge General Hospital No. 16; consequently, negotiations were entered into and leases secured for suitable  


540

adjoining property upon which temporary buildings could be constructed. On March 18, the construction of 10 open-air wards, a kitchen and mess hall for the sick, nurses' quarters for 26 nurses, a storehouse, a hospital exchange, three barracks, a kitchen and mess hall for the enlisted personnel of the Medical Department, and a guardhouse were authorized by the Surgeon General.78 The construction of these additional buildings was begun on May 21, and within a month some of them had been completed and occupied. By September 5, they had all been finished and occupied. Later it was necessary to add four more buildings, which were completed on October 1, 1918; but some other minor construction and alteration work was found necessary from time to time. The total cost of the work done on the hospital was $350,000; and 500 beds for the sick were provided.80

Nineteen hundred and sixty-eight patients were admitted to the hospital. Of this number, 719 were nontuberculous, among whom there were 267 influenza patients; of the 1,249 tuberculosis patients, 435 were returned to duty, 428 were discharged on surgeon's certificate of disability, 280 were transferred to other hospitals for treatment, and 106 died.81

On May 18, 1919, the Surgeon General recommended that the hospital be abandoned on August 1, 1919.82 This recommendation was approved; and in accordance with law the Surgeon General was directed to transfer the control of the hospital to the United States Public Health Service. It was soon found, however, that it would be impracticable to close the hospital on August 1, and its abandonment was deferred one month.83 Two hundred sick remaining in the hospital, and requiring further treatment in military hospital, were distributed, by transfer, to General Hospitals Nos. 8, 19, and 21.

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn., from March, 1918, to August, 1919, inclusive


541

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 17, MARKLETON, PA.

The Markleton Sanatorium was situated in the mountainous region of western Pennsylvania, at an altitude of 1,700 feet above sea level. It was adjacent to the railroad station of Markleton, on the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and was six hours, traveling time, west of Washington and three hours east of Pittsburgh. The town of Markleton comprised, mainly, the railroad station, 2 stores, and about 20 small dwellings located along the railroad tracks to a coal mine about three-fourths of a mile distant. The nearest town of any size was Rockwood, about 7 miles away.84

The sanatorium was nestled among the mountains, which shut it in on both the east and the west, and was, therefore, not exposed to the cold winds of the winter. Its main building was a five-story, steam-heated, brick structure, with north and south frame wings, each of which was 150 feet long. There were 150 rooms in the building, all in a poor state of repair.

In January, 1918, the sanatorium was offered to the Government, for lease or sale.84 A representative of the Surgeon General's Office inspected it, and, on February 5, the Surgeon General recommended that it be leased for use as a


542

general hospital in the care and treatment of tuberculosis.85 The recommendation was approved, and the lease was executed February 25, 1918.86 Included in the transaction were the sanatorium, with its complete equipment, a laundry and cold-storage plant, a power plant, outbuildings, several farmhouses, and 100 acres of land, all obtained for a rental of $20,000 a year.84 Under a separate agreement, some cottages were leased for use as quarters for nurses on duty at the hospital. The designation General Hospital No. 17 was given on March 21, 1918;87 it was opened in the following month, with a bed capacity of 100,86 and was soon filled.

At the time General Hospital No. 17 was secured, the need for additional beds for tuberculosis patients in general hospitals was pressing, and it was

FIG. 179.-General Hospital No. 17, Markleton, Pa.

exceedingly difficult to find suitably located places that could be used for the treatment of tuberculosis, and even more difficult to induce owners of properties to lease them: they were decidedly averse to the use of them for hospitals for the tuberculous. These almost unsurmountable difficulties influenced the selection of the comparatively undesirable Markleton Sanatorium. It was not well suited to general hospital purposes; it was small and would not have permitted of an economical expansion by the construction of a sufficient number of buildings to constitute a hospital that would be on a par with the general hospitals then being provided. It was estimated that between 300 and 400 patients could be cared for; however, the subsequent history of the hospital, not unlike those of General Hospitals Nos. 13, 15, and 18, proved the fallacy of this estimate.


543

On March 4, 1918, personnel was sent to the hospital, and its renovation and alteration were begun.86 Following this, the construction of six tuberculosis wards, in the vicinity of the main building, was authorized and started.86 This temporary construction was stopped, however, after three buildings had been built. At one time, in the summer of 1918, the abandonment of the hospital was considered; but the entertainment of the idea was dropped:88 there was too much uncertainty regarding future military necessities. It developed at this time, too, that the lesson had been led to understand that the sanatorium had been leased for not only the period of the war, but one year thereafter, and that it was mainly because of this understanding that he had been induced to permit the discontinuance of the sanatorium, as such, and to enter into a lease with the Government.

Later in the fall available bed space for the tuberculous became critical, and further construction at this hospital was requested, but, because of the armistice, was not consummated.  The maximum bed capacity of the hospital was 200.89 This bed capacity had been attained by August, 1918, coincident with the number of patients under treatment. Both bed capacity and the number of patients remained at that figure until the hospital was closed on March 27, 1919.90

Being a hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis, the development of physical reconstruction activities was attempted, but, due to the small size of the hospital, the results, as obtained elsewhere, were not secured.91

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 17, Markleton, Pa., from March, 1918, to April 9, 1919, inclusive


544

GENERAL HOSPITAL NO. 18, WAYNESVILLE, N. C.

General Hospital No. 18 was established in a heterogeneous group of buildings scattered along the north bank of Richland Creek in the outskirts of the town of Waynesville. The various buildings which composed the hospital were an old hotel, its annex, a pavilion and spring house, five small outbuildings, and some separately located cottages. The hotel building was three stories high, of brick construction, and had porches extending along the front and both sides for the first and second floors, with smaller porches at the rear. It had been constructed in 1883 and contained 80 rooms.  The annex was a wooden building, 3 stories high, fronted toward the main building 100 yards distant, and had 40 rooms. The pavilion and spring house had formerly been used as a dance hall for the guests of the hotel, and was about 300 yards distant.

The grounds surrounding the hotel comprised 14½ acres, upon which was located the White Sulphur Springs that possessed a local reputation for being beneficial in the cure of rheumatism and skin diseases and was used as an attractive feature by the hotel. Adjacent to the hotel property there was a 167-acre farm, which was obtained and used by the educational and recreational department of the hospital.

The terrain was more or less level and was a part of Richland Valley, which, at this point, was about 3 miles in width, being delimited on either  


545

side by mountains of the Blue Ridge Range. Picturesque brooks traversed the valley and afforded ample drainage throughout.

The mean average temperature for the year was 59° F.  The thermometer rarely dropped below the freezing point in winter, and seldom rose above 80° in summer. During summer days there were usually cool breezes blowing from the mountains, and it was extremely infrequent that blankets were not required at night. During the winter the nights were frosty, but the days were usually sunshiny and almost balmy; snow rarely lay for more than a very few hours.

On March 14, 1918, the property was investigated by a representative of the Surgeon General; and, based upon his recommendation, it was leased on March 26, at the rate of $10,000 a year.93

There was an acute necessity at this time for the provision of hospital space for the care and treatment of cases of tuberculosis in the military service; the necessity for distributing these tuberculosis hospitals throughout the United States added to the difficulties attending the acquisition of suitable space; and the advisability of strongly considering the location of them in places popularly known to be beneficial made the problem even more perplexing. It was difficult to lease readily convertible properties, even though unsuitable, for the treatment of tuberculosis, and it was seldom possible that first class buildings could be secured. It was neither the desire nor the intention of the Surgeon General to greatly enlarge General Hospital No. 18 at the time when it was organized:94 it was expected that ere long space would become available in the semipermanent tuberculosis hospitals then being especially constructed. So, in order to temporarily increase the bed capacity of General Hospital No. 18, that it might be utilized to the greatest extent in increasing the total number of available beds for the tuberculous, enlisted men on duty at the hospital were quartered in tents.95 In August, 1918, however, the erection of three additional buildings was recommended,96 and the construction of these was completed in January, 1919. Some additional expenditures were made in the alteration and repair of certain of the buildings; and the heating arrangements, being insufficient or totally lacking in some of the buildings, were rectified. A reconstruction service was provided and established in the pavilion but it was not developed to any great extent.

Opening with a capacity of 250 in April, 1918,97 100 sick were sent there and within a very short period the hospital was completely filled. During the summer the capacity was constantly increased by better interior organization, by the housing of attendants in tents, and by the renovation of additional acquired space until in the late summer a capacity of 600 was reached.98 During this period the hospital was completely full and remained so until about November of that year when, due to the acquisition of additional general hospital space for tuberculosis elsewhere, the number of sick fell to the less disturbing figure of 350, near which it remained until March, 1919.98 On May 7, 1919, upon the recommendation of the Surgeon General, this hospital was abandoned and the property returned to the lessor.99  


546

Statistical data, United States Army General Hospital No. 18, Waynesville, N. C., from April, 1918, to March 31, 1919, inclusive


547

REFERENCES

(1) Letter from Maj. Wm. C. Williams, I. G. D., to the Inspector General of the Army, January 25, 1919. Subject: Inspection of United States Army General Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 333 (General Hosp. No. 9) K.

(2) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 9 at Lakewood, N. J., on April 7-8,1919, by Col. E. R. Schreiner, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 9) K. 

(3) Report from Capt. Francis S. Paterno, Q. M. C., to Chief of Construction Division, February 25, 1919. Subject: Completion report of construction work at United States Army General Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J. On file, Historical Division S. G. O. (Gen. Hosp. No. 9) K. 

(4) Letter from the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J., to the Surgeon General, April 8, 1918. Subject: Lease of the Florence-in-the-Pines to be used as nurses' quarters. On file Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Lakewood, N. J. ) F.

(5) Report from Col. Charles F. Mason, M. C., to the Surgeon General, January 16, 1919. Subject: Annual Report of General Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J. for 1918. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O.

(6) Second indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, February 1, 1919. Subject: Designation of general hospital. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 322.3 (Misc. Sec.).  

(7) Report of sanitary inspection of United States Army General Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N. J., made by Col. W. F. Truby, M. C., on October 20, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G.O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 9) K.

(8) Letter from the Surgeon General to commanding officer, Base Hospital, Camp Meade, Md., June 6, 1918. Subject: Treatment of cardiovascular diseases at General Hospital No. 9. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 702 (Gen. Hosp. No. 9) K.

(9) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 10, Parker Hill, Boston, Mass., by Col. Jere B. Clayton, M. C., on May 5, 1919. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 10) K.

(10) Shown in lease. Copy on file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (General Hospital No. 10).

(11) Sixth indorsement from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 26, 1918. Subject: Approval of lease of Elks' Hospital, Boston, Mass. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 10) K.

(12) Shown in lease. Copy on file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Boston City Hall, Mass.) S.

(13) Letter from Col. John T. Clarke, M. C., to the Surgeon General, August 29, 1920. Subject: Report of activities of General Hospital No. 10, Boston, Mass. On file, Historical Division, S. G. O. (Gen. Hosp. No. 10).

(14) Letter from Maj. Charles L. Greene, M. C., to the Surgeon General, November 18, 1918. Subject: Report on conditions affecting physical reconstruction at General Hospital No. 10, Parker Hill. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 356 (Gen. Hosp. No. 10) K.

(15) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Commanding officer, General Hospital No. 10, May 10, 1919. Subject: Reduction in bed capacity. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 10) K.

(16) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(17) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Director of Operations, General Staff, May 28, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of lease. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 10) K. 

(18) Letter from Secretary of War to Hon. Henry Cabot Lodge, United States Senate, June 20, 1919. Subject: General Hospital No. 10, Boston, Mass. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 10) K.

(19) Letter from Lieut. Col. W. L. Reed, I. G. D., to the Inspector General of the Army, June 20, 1918. Subject: Inspection of General Hospital No. 11, Cape May, N. J. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 333.1 (1) (Gen. Hosp. No. 11) K.

(20) Report of sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 11, Cape May, N. J., December 3, 1918, by Col. W. F. Truby, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 11) K.

(21) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, December 18, 1917. Subject: Cape May Hotel, Cape May, N. J. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Cape May N. J.) S.

(22) Letter from W. R. Ramsey, attorney, Washington, D. C., to the Surgeon General, November 30, 1917. Subject: Cape May Hotel. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 11) K.  


548

(23) Letter from Quartermaster, headquarters, Eastern Department, to the Quartermaster General, January 18, 1918. Subject: Lease of Cape May Hotel. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Cape May, N. J.) S.

(24) Copy of renewal lease. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 11) K.

(25) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 14, 1918. Subject: General hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(26) Shown on weekly bed reports. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(27) First indorsement from General Hospital No. 11, Cape May, N. J., to the Surgeon General, August 5, 1919. Subject: Closing of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602.1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 11) K.

(28) Letter from Chief of Real Estate Service, War Department, to Cape May Hotel Co., Cape May, N. J., July 21, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of lease. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 11) K.

(29) Letter from Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, December 20, 1917. Subject: Kenilworth Inn, Kenilworth, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Asheville, N. C.) F.

(30) Second indorsement from A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, January 2, 1918. Subject: Approval of lease for Kenilworth Inn. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Asheville, N. C.) F.

(31) Letter from Col. H. C. Fisher, M. C., to the Surgeon General, undated. Subject: Report on Kenilworth Hotel, Biltmore, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Biltmore, N. C.) S.

(32) Letter from Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 14, 1918. Subject: General hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp.) K.

(33) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 12, to the Surgeon General, May 25, 1918. Subject: Arrival of patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 12) K.

(34) Letter from Maj. A. V. Moschovitz, M. C., to Col. Raymond P. Sullivan, M. C., January 13, 1919. Subject: Report of consultation visit to General Hospital No. 12, Biltmore, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 333-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 12) K.

(35) Shown on weekly bed report, May 15, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 U.

(36) Shown on weekly bed report, June 26, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 U.

(37) Shown on weekly bed report, compiled in Surgeon General's Office. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(38) First Indorsement from S. G. O. to Quartermaster General, Director, Purchase and Storage, October 17, 1919. Subject: General Hospital No. 12 was discontinued September 1, 1919. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 210.8-1 (Gen. Hosp. No. 12) K.

(39) Letter from Surgeon General to General Staff, War Department, May 28, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of leases. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 General.

(40) Letter from Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, June 6, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 12, Biltmore, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 12) K.

(41) Letter from the Surgeon General to the commanding officer, General Hospital No. 12, Biltmore, N. C., September 8, 1919. Subject: Transfer of General Hospital No. 12 to Public Health Service. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 12) K.

(42) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, December 20, 1917. Subject: Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Dansville, N. Y.) F.

(43) Second Indorsement from A. G. O. to Surgeon General, January 2, 1918.  Subject: Approval of lease for Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Dansville, N. Y.) F.

(44) Letter from quartermaster, headquarters, Eastern Department, to Quartermaster General, January 18, 1918. Subject: Execution of lease for Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Dansville, N. Y.) F.

(45) Letter from Lieut. Col. W. L. Pyles, M. C., to the Surgeon General, November 23, 1917. Subject: Report of inspection, Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Dansville, N. Y.) S.

(46) Letter from Maj. A. H. Crosbie, M. R. C., commanding officer, General Hospital No. 13, Dansville, N. Y., to the Surgeon General, February 23, 1918. Subject: Report of progress. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13), K.  


549

(47) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, May 9, 1918. Subject: Cancellation of the lease of General Hospital No. 13, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(48) First Indorsement from A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, May 13, 1918. Subject: Approval of request to cancel lease of Jackson Sanatorium, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 14) K.

(49) Letter from Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, June 29, 1918.  Subject: New lease for General Hospital No. 13, Dansville, N. Y. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(50) Copy of lease. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O. (Dansville, N. Y.).

(51) Letter from Acting Surgeon General to Adjutant General, June 12, 1918. Subject: Transfer of personnel and equipment from Dansville, N. Y. to Richmond, Va. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(52) Letter from Acting Surgeon General to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 13, Dansville, N. Y., September 17, 1918. Subject: Organization of General Hospital No. 13. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(53) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 13, to Surgeon General, November 24, 1918. Subject: Report of transfer of patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(54) Letter from the Surgeon General to Construction Division, War Department, March 12, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of lease and abandonment of General Hospital No. 13. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(55) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 13, Dansville, N. Y. to Surgeon General, April 28, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 13. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 13) K.

(56) "Outline Description of Military Posts and Reservations in the United States and Alaska and of National Cemeteries." Washington, Government Printing Office, 1904.

(57) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, May 18, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks of certain posts for hospital purposes. On file, Mail and Record Division, A. G. O., 2600303 (Old Files Section).

(58) Letter from The Adjutant General to the commanding general, Southeastern Department, June 23, 1917. Subject: Use of permanent barracks at certain posts for general or base hospital accommodations. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(59) Night letter from the Surgeon General to the department surgeon, Southeastern Department, June 25, 1917. Subject: Request for plans of a base hospital at certain posts. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176795 (Old Files).

(60) Letters from the Surgeon General to the Quartermaster General, various dates. Subject: Temporary hospital buildings at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 176796 (Old Files).

(61) Letters from the Surgeon General to the Construction Division, War Department, various dates. Subject: Alteraton and construction of buildings. On file, Hospital Division, S. G. O., (Gen. Hosp. No. 14, General Hospital Requests).

(62) Telegram from Kirkpatrick, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga., to the Surgeon General, November 24, 1917. Subject: Hospital administration. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Post Hospital, Fort Oglethorpe) N.

(63) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, March 14, 1918. Subject: General hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.3 (General Hospitals) K.

(64) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Director of Operations, General Staff, May 22, 1919. Subject: Closing of General Hospital No. 14 as such. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 320.2 (Gen. Hosp. No. 14) K.

(65) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, January 25, 1918. Subject: Lease of Beach Hotel, Corpus Christi, Tex. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Corpus Christi) F. 

(66) Letter from Surgeon General to commanding officer, hospital, Corpus Christi, Tex., March 2, 1918. Subject: Instruction for establishment of hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7-5 (Gen. Hosp. No. 15) K.

(67) First Indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, March 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O, 323.7 (General Hospitals) K.  


550 

(68) First Indorsement from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 15, to the Surgeon General, December 27, 1918. Subject: Statistical information. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 730 (Gen. Hosp. No. 15) K.

(69) Letter from the Surgeon General to chief surgeon, Port of Embarkation, Hoboken, N. J., July 26, 1918. Subject: Use of General Hospital No. 15 for convalescent patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (Gen. Hosp. No. 15) K.

(70) Shown on weekly report compiled in the Surgeon General's Office. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(71) Letter from The Adjutant General to the Surgeon General, February 26, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 15, Corpus Christi, Tex. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 15) K.

(72) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 15 to the Surgeon General, May 31, 1919. Subject: Transfer to Public Health Service. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 15) K.

(73) Report on property tendered for hospital purposes. New Haven Hospital inspected by Col. G. E. Bushnell, M. C., January 16, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (New Haven Hospital, West Haven, Conn.) S.

(74) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, February 8, 1918. Subject: Lease of New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn., for tuberculosis. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (New Haven, Conn.) F.

(75) Memorandum for Acting Chief of Staff for Assistant Secretary of War, February 11, 1918. Subject: Lease of New Haven Hospital for tuberculosis hospital. Approved February 12, 1918. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (New Haven, Conn.) F. Also: Telegram from George B. Lummer, New Haven, Conn., to the Surgeon General, February 26, 1918: "Lease signed for hospital today." On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (New Haven, Conn.) F.

(76) First Indorsement from War Department, A. G. O. to the Surgeon General, March 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of hospitals. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (General Hospitals) K.

(77) Shown on weekly bed reports compiled in the Surgeon General's Office. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(78) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, April 3, 1918. Subject: Authority to construct additional wards and buildings at the United States Army General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Gen. Hosp. No. 16) K.

(79) Third Indorsement from War Department, S. G. O. to Construction Division, War Department, July 23, 1918. Subject: Additional construction, General Hospital No. 16. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Gen. Hosp. No. 16.) K

(80) Letter from Surgeon General, United States Army, to Surgeon General, Public Health Service, August 15, 1918. Subject: Transfer of General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.72-3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 16) K.

(81) Compiled from sick and wounded reports, General Hospital No. 16. Now on file, World War Div., A. G. O.

(82) Letter from the Surgeon General to the Chief of Staff, May 28, 1919. Subject: Cancellation of leases. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 General.

(83) Letter from Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, June 18, 1919. Subject: Abandonment of General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 602 (Gen. Hosp. No. 16) K.

(84) Letter from M. B. Barnett, Markleton, Pa., to the Surgeon General, United States Army, January 29, 1918. Subject: Sale or lease of Markleton Sanatorium. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Markleton, Pa.) F.

(85) Letter from the Surgeon General to The Adjutant General, February 5, 1918. Subject: Lease of Markleton Sanatorium, Markleton, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Markleton) F.

(86) Letter from Col. W. L. Reed, I. G. D., to the Inspector General of the Army, June 13, 1918. Subject: Inspection of General Hospital No. 17. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 333 (Gen. Hosp. No. 17) K.  


551

(87) First Indorsement from War Department, A. G. O., to the Surgeon General, March 21, 1918. Subject: Designation of hospital at Markleton, Pa. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 17) K.

(88) Letter from Brig. Gen. Robert E. Noble, M. C., to Senator Boise Penrose, United States Senate, September 18, 1918. Subject: Markleton Sanatorium, General Hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 601 (Markleton, Pa.) F.

(89) Shown on weekly bed reports compiled in the Surgeon General's Office, On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(90) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 17, Markleton, Pa., to Col. Roger Brooke, M. C., March 28, 1919. Subject: Transfer of patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 17) K.

(91) Reports from Chief of Educational Service, General Hospital No. 17, to the Surgeon General, various dates. Subject: Report of educational work. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 456 (Gen. Hosp. No. 17) K.

(92) Report on special sanitary inspection of General Hospital No. 18, Waynesville, N. C. Made on August 8, 1918, by Lieut. Col. F. W. Weed, M. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 721 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

(93) Telegram from Gorgas to J. B. Sloan, Waynesville, N. C., March 26, 1918. Subject: Secretary of War has approved leasing of hotel at rate of $10,000 per year. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Waynesville, N. C.) F. And: Telegram from Dunn to Surgeon General. March 28, 1918. Subject: Just received word that lease was signed in Charleston, yesterday. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 481 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

(94) Letter from the Surgeon General to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 18, Waynesville, N. C. June 27, 1918. Subject: Administration. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 322.3 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

(95) Letter from quartermaster to commanding officer, General Hospital No. 18, July 31, 1918. Subject: Buildings for use at this hospital. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

(96) Second indorsement from War Department, S. G. O. to Construction Division, War Department, August 13, 1918. Subject: Additional construction General Hospital No. 18, Waynesville, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 652 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

(97) Telegram from Davis, commanding, to the Surgeon General, April 24, 1918. Subject: Hospital ready to receive patients. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 705 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

(98) Shown on weekly bed report compiled in the Surgeon General's Office. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 632 (U).

(99) Letter from commanding officer, General Hospital No. 18, to the Surgeon General, May 7, 1919.  Subject: Official closing of United States Army General Hospital No. 18, Waynesville, N. C. On file, Record Room, S. G. O., 323.7 (Gen. Hosp. No. 18) K.

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