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Appendix B

Table of Contents

APPENDIX B

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

HEADQUARTERS 9th INFANTRY DIVISION

APO San Francisco 96370

AVDE-MD

28 October 1968

SUBJECT: Prevention of Skin Disease

SEE DISTRIBUTION

1. The maintenance of the health of a unit is a command responsibility. Tropical skin diseases are the most common cause of non-effectiveness within the 9th Infantry Division Area. Commanders have adequate medical personnel, effective medications and proven techniques to reduce this very serious problem.

2. Diseases of the foot and boot area develop rapidly after 48 hours of continuous exposure to the rice paddies and swamps, and may affect 35% to 50% of the combat strength of an infantry unit after 72 hours. With each succeeding exposure, skin infections are more severe and require longer to heal. Minor infections will heal within three days; serious infections may require over three weeks of intensive treatments.

3. Consequently, commanders will limit operations to 48 hours in the paddy followed by a minimum of 24 hours utilization in a dry area. This limitation will be exceeded only in situations which override the inevitable loss of combat strength from skin disease.

4. Additionally, to reduce the non-effectiveness rate caused by skin disease, commanders will conduct foot inspections and require their men to put on dry socks daily. Men should remove their boots and socks whenever possible, [up to four hours daily], to let their feet dry out. After an operation all personnel will be examined by medical personnel.

JULIAN J. EWELL

Major General, USA

Commanding