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Appendix J

Table of Contents

APPENDIX J
DUTIES OF MEMBERS OF
THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT,
1814

Physician and Surgeon General:
     1) establish rules for management of Army hospitals and see that they are enforced;
     2) appoint stewards and nurses;
     3) request and receive returns of medicines, surgical instruments, hospital stores;
     4) authorize, regulate supply of regimental medicine chests;
     5) report twice a year on regimental medicine chests, sick in hospitals to War Department;
     6) report yearly to War Department on estimated supply needs.

  Apothecary General:
     1) assist Physician and Surgeon General in his duties;
     2) obey orders of Physician and Surgeon General,  

Apothecary General and his assistants:
     1) receive and manage all hospital stores, medicines, surgical instruments, dressings, bought by commissary general of purchases or his deputies;
     2) account to superintendant general of military supplies for all disbursement of items under 1) above;
     3) pay monthly wages of stewards, ward masters, nurses of hospital;
     4) compound, prepare, and issue medicines under direction of Physician and Surgeon General or on estimates and
requisitions of senior hospital surgeons and regimental surgeons;
     5) regulate, under supervision of superintendant general of military supplies, forms of returns made quarterly to apothecary general's office by deputy apothecaries, surgeons, mates, or those having charge of instruments, medicine, hospital stores, hospital equipment of any kind.

Senior hospital surgeons:
     1) direct medical staff in army or district to which he is attached;
     2) live at or near headquarters;
     3) countersign all requisitions of regimental surgeons or mates made on apothecary general or his assistants;
     4) inspect hospitals under him, correcting abuses and reporting delinquencies;
     5) make quarterly reports to Physician and Surgeon General on sick and wounded in his hospital and on medicines, instruments, hospital stores received, expended, on hand, and wanted;  


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     6) keep diary of weather, medical topography of country where he is serving;
     7) report to commanding officer concerning anything concerning the health of the troops.;

Hospital surgeons:
     1) superintend everything relating to hospital;
     2) order steward to furnish whatever is needed by the sick;
     3) visit sick and wounded in hospital every morning;
     4) require from resident mate report on all changes since morning;
     5) instruct mate in writing on care of patients;
     6) have police rules of hospital displayed in each ward;
     7) assign appropriate wards to patients;
     8) keep register of all patients admitted;
     9) keep case book of every important or interesting case of disease and report on it monthly.

Mates:
     1) visit patients with surgeon, take note of his prescriptions;
     2) keep case book;
     3) attend to carrying out of surgeon's prescriptions;
     4) dress all wounds;
     5) enforce discipline;
     6) one mate, at least, to remain on call;
     7) responsible for medicines and instruments.  

Steward:
     1) receive and take charge of all hospital stores, furniture, utensils, under surgeon's direction;
     2) keep accurate account of all issues;
     3) responsible to Apothecary General or his assistant.  

Ward master: under steward's direction:
     1) receive arms, accoutrements, clothing of every patient admitted;
     2) have clothes immediately washed, numbered, labeled with name, regiment, company of patient and properly stored;
     3) responsible for cleanliness of wards and patients;
     4) call roll every morning and evening;
     5) supervise handling of closestools, seeing that they are cleaned at least three times a day and always have proper quantity of water or charcoal in them;
     6) see that beds and bedding are properly aired and exposed to sun, weather permitting;
     7) see that straw in each bed sack changed at least once a month;
     8) see that each patient washed and has hair combed every morning;
     9) see that bed and bedding of patient who has been discharged or has died is cleaned and straw burned;
   10) see that nurses and attendants are kind and attentive to patients;
   11) supervise all attendants.  

    SOURCE: Paraphrased from Palmer, Historical Register, 3: 7-9.