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Footnotes

Table of Contents

FOOTNOTES

1. Palmer, LTG Bruce, Jr., "The Army in the Dominican Republic" in Army Magazine, vol. 15, No. 16, November, 1965.

2. Ibid.

3. Troop A, 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 82d Airborne Division.

4. 2d Battalion, 325th Infantry; 1st and 2d Battalions, 505th Infantry.

5. USFORDOMREP General Orders Nos. 1, 2 and 4, 7 May 1965.

6. (1) Report, Commanding Officer, Company D, 307th Medical Battalion, to Commanding Officer, 307th Medical Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, 2 June 1965, subject: Interim Report, Dominican Republic Stabilization Operation. (2) Brief History of 82d Airborne Division Civil Aid Program in Dominican Republic (29 Apr. - 31 July). [Official record]

7. 36 aircraft for the hospital alone.

8. McCaleb, LTC Foster C., Jr.: Historical Activities Report, Medical Operations in the Dominican Republic. [Official record.]

9. USFORDOMREP General Orders No. 7, 10 Dec. 1965.

10. The 82d Airborne Division reported in its 1965 Medical Service Activities Report, 28 Feb. 1966, that patient care for division personnel in the Dominican Republic "was provided by fourteen unit aid stations and three clearing companies of the 307th Med. Bn. One of the clearing companies established a 25-bed capacity holding facility and cared for 82d Abn. Div. troopers who required short term hospitalization. Basic laboratory procedures such as gram stains, blood counts and urinalyses, were performed by the medical officers and enlisted men at these Division level installations. The evacuation support was provided by the 15th Field Hospital and an Air Force Casualty Staging Facility at San Isidro Airfield. However, because of the unconventional combat situation, the normal chain of evacuation--aid station to clearing company to hospital and etc.--often was not exactly adhered to. This often was generated by the tactical situation requiring clearing companies to be located further from the combat area than the Field Hospital and when civilian aid stations (operated by the clearing companies) were located within the city of Santa Domingo."

11. On 15 June, physicians of the Brazilian Forces voluntarily augmented the professional staff of the 15th Field Hospital. The South American physicians performed some operations, including one neurosurgical procedure on a head wound.

12. (1) Appendix I (Medical) to Annex M (Logistics) to USCOMDOMREP, OPORD 2-65, 081500R June 1965. (2) Appendix I (Medical) to Annex M (Logistics) to USFORDOMREP, OPORD 4-65 (U), 071200R October 1965.

13. See footnote 8, p. 8.

14. Unclassified Routine Message (AJDSU 5600DR), Commanding General, 82d Airborne Division, to Distribution A, 30 July 1965.

15. Unclassified Routine Message (AJDSU 6963DR), Commanding General. 82d Airborne Division, to Distribution A, 15 Sep. 1965.

16. (1) Seven cases in May, one in June, and 12 in July before the number began to decline. (2) Statistics based on U.S. Army Dominican Republic Morbidity Reports for July, August, September, and October. (3) Routine Unclassified Message (AJDSU 5317DR), Commanding General, 82d Airborne Division, to Distribution A, 22 July 1965.

17. Disposition Form, Surgeon, USCONARC, to Chief of Staff, USCONARC, 27 July 1965, subject: Immunization of Troops.

18. (1) Hostetter, 1LT Donald L.: Operations of the 714th Preventive Medicine Detachment During the Dominican Crisis. [Official record.] (2) Report, Surgeon, 5th Logistical Command, to Commanding Officer, 5th Logistical Command (-), 7 June 1965, subject: 714th Preventive Medicine Unit Operations.

19. The consolidated Morbidity Reports for U.S. Army, Dominican Republic, show 127 cases of skin infections in 1965 and 97 in 1966. There were also a total of 2,139 cases of venereal disease in 1965 and 1,228 cases in 1966. Together there were 3,464 cases of skin infections and venereal diseases among U.S. Army personnel during the entire period from 30 April 1965 to 18 September 1966.

20. Command Health Reports.

21. Appendix I, After Action Report, Division Psychiatric Activities, Dominican Republic, in Annual Medical Service Activities Report, 82d Airborne Division, 1965.

22. Ibid.

23. Flies and other insects in the Dominican Republic had become resist ant to DDT. Malathion was one of the newer and safer organophosphates in the Army supply system and was especially effective against flies.

24. See footnote 8, p. 8.

25. Two areas were predominantly Plasmodium vivax and the other Plasmodium falciparum.

26. Morbidity Reports for the U.S. Army, Dominican Republic, listed one case of malaria and five cases of dengue.

27. (1) Many individuals, after taking their weekly chloroquine-primaquine tablets, complained of headache, nausea, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea during the ensuing 24 hours. As usual, some of these men then stopped taking the drugs. Personnel who had a bona fide reaction to chloroquine-primaquine severe enough to warrant discontinuation of the drug were medically evacuated to the continental United States. (2) Routine Unclassified Message (2642DR), Commanding General, 82d Airborne Division, to Distribution A. 14 June 1965. (3) See footnote 18 (1), p. 18.

28. Mosquitoes in the area had built up a resistance to DDT, as well as to some of the more toxic organophosphates such as dieldrin and Diazinon.

29. Routine Unclassified Message (AJDSU 3039DR), Commanding General, 82d Airborne Division, to Distribution A, 20 June 1965.

30. See footnote 8, p. 8.

31. See footnote 8, p. 8.  

32. See footnote 6, p. 8.

33. Report, Commanding Officer, Company C, 307th Medical Battalion, to Commanding Officer, 307th Medical Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, 2 June 1965, subject: Interim After Action Report.

34. Diary of Actions, 55th Medical Group, 27 Apr.-5 May 1965. [Official record.]

35. Report, Commanding Officer, 15th Field Hospital, to Commanding Officer, 5th Logistical Command, 13 June 1965, subject: U.S. Stability Operations in the Dominican Republic.

36. Report, Commanding Officer, 15th Field Hospital, to Commanding Officer, 5th Logistical Command, 24 May 1965, subject: Summary of the Initial Operation of the 15th Field Hospital.

37. Located near the Brigade Headquarters which was across the road from a civilian orthopedic hospital on the eastern outskirts of the city.

38. See footnote 33, p. 31.

39. Report, Commanding Officer, Company B. 307th Medical Battalion, to Commanding Officer, 307th Medical Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, 19 Nov 1965, subject: After Action Report-Dominican Republic Stabilization Operation.

40. See footnote 36, p. 32.

41. (1) Major Goolsbee was replaced by 1LT Robert L. Cooper, MSC, on 15 July, who was followed by 1LT Charles 0. Jordan, Jr., MSC, on l9 November. The unit was returned to Fort Bragg, N.C., in December in the administrative move previously described which actually involved leaving equipment and personnel in the Dominican Republic to be absorbed by the 42d Field Hospital. (2) Medical Service Activities Report, 545th Medical Detachment (Sup), 9 Mar. 1966.

42. See footnote 41 (2), p. 36.

43. Promoted to major during the operation.

44. (1) Report, Commanding Officer, 54th Medical Detachment (Hel-Amb), to Commanding Officer, 5th Logistical Command, 29 May 1965, subject: After Action Report, 6-26 May 1965. (2) Report, Commanding Officer, 54th Medical Detachment (Hel-Amb), to Commanding Officer, 15th Field Hospital (-), 29 July 1965, subject: Brief of Activities Since Arriving in Dominican Republic. (3) Report, Commanding Officer, 54th Medical Detachment (Hel-Amb), to Commanding Officer, 54th Medical Detachment, 25 Oct. 1965, subject: Typical Briefing Outline (54th Med).

45. (1) Report, Commanding Officer, 15th Field Hospital, to Commanding Officer, 5th Logistical Command, 13 June 1965, subject: U.S. Stability Operations in the Dominican Republic. (2) Later the ambulance contingent was reduced to one platoon and ambulances were spread out at collecting points with the 82d Airborne Division, with Force Headquarters, as well as at Jaina and Boca Chica.

46. At that time the hospital's five wards consisted of an intensive care unit, a general surgical ward, a male medical ward, a women's ward, and a Pediatric ward (the last two for civilians).

47. See footnote 45.

48. Annual Army Medical Service Activities Report, 15th Field Hospital, 3 Jan. 1966.

49. Horne, MAJ Ruth, ANC: Sequence of Events During the Recent Dominican Republic Situation as Recalled by Major Ruth Horne, 15th Field Hospital Chief Nurse, 30 Apr. 1965-8 June 1965. [Official record.]

50. (1) Dentists of the 82d Airborne Division removed 1,770 teeth from Dominicans and made 39 permanent restorations during the year. During the same time they removed 702 teeth for military personnel and made 241 permanent restorations. (2) Medical Service Activities Report, 82d Airborne Division, 28 Feb. 1966.

51. (1) Historical Activities (DomRep), Office of the Surgeon, Headquarters, XVIII Airborne Corps. [Official record.] (2) See footnote 8, p. 8. (3) See footnote 50 (2), p. 44.

52. Brief History of 82d Airborne Division Civil Aid Program in Dominican Republic (29 Apr.-31 July). [Official record.]

53. See footnote 8, p. 8.