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HEADQUARTERS 7TH MEDICAL BATTALION

Korean War Unit Histories

HEADQUARTERS 7TH MEDICAL BATTALION

APO # 7, c/o Postmaster

San Francisco, California

18 January 1951

SUBJECT:      Letter of Transmittal

THRU      :      Technical Channels

TO            :      The Surgeon

                        Headquarters EUSAK

                        APO 301

1. Transmitted herewith is Annual Report of Army Medical Service Activities for the year 1950 (Reports Control Symbol MED-41).

2. The report is assembled in the following manner:

Section I - Chronological Discussion of Events for the Year.

Section II - Recapitulation of Strength by Months for the Year.

Section III - Summary of General Supply Activities.

Section IV - Summary of Medical Supply Activities.

Section V - Annual Report of Dental Service.

Section VI - Recapitulation of Dental Services.

FOR THE COMMANDING OFFICER:

[signed]

ROBERT S. O'HERN

Captain            MSC

Adjutant

1 Incl:  As stated


1

SECTION I

CHRONOLOGICAL DISCUSSION OF EVENTS FOR THE YEAR

The first day of the New Year 1950 found the 7th Medical Battalion Headquarters and its main components situated at Camp Crawford, Hokkaido, Japan. The mission of the battalion at the onset of the year was to provide medical services for the organic elements of the 7th Infantry Division and various attached units which were stationed on northern Honshu, end the island of Hokkaido, Japan, either for the purpose of training or occupation. In order to adequately provide medical service to the varied type units and to meet the needs of their particular locale the battalion had at certain instances detachments functioning from a Medical Department No 2 Chest and at another location a detachment of the battalion was operating a 50 bed type hospital. These varied responsibilities which at times tended to deprive the battalion of field training from a total battalion level standpoint proved to be valuable for "On the Job Training". A rotation of assignment policy was established which was particularly designed to enable Medical, Surgical, X-Ray, Laboratory and Pharmacy Technicians to actually train while on the job, and to rotate others back to the battalion for field training. Administrative technicians while on duty with hospital and dispensary type installations were also afforded the opportunity of learning from practical experience the duties of Admission and Disposition Sections and Registrar.

Intensive training under snow and extreme cold conditions commenced on a battalion level in January and was continuing in February. The weather conditions on Hokkaido permitted exceptional training of this type. The Shimamatsu Maneuver Area near Camp Crawford was large enough to allow battalion and regimental combat team exercises. Particular emphasis was directed toward evacuation and care of the sick and wounded under the climatic conditions present. Use and Care of T/O&E equipment under extreme cold was stressed. Ski classes were held and approximately 30 percent of the battalion became skilled skiiers. Practically all members of the battalion present became proficient in the use of snow shoes. Periods of three continuous days were spent in the field under severe cold and snow conditions and individuals learned how to live and take care of themselves. Each section built snow quarters and individual fox holes and shelters with cover and concealment effected.

Training in March was conducted in a similar manner, as in January and February except the battalion progressed to a period to allow more time devoted to evacuation on a regimental level. Drivers were trained in the operation of weasels. Litter loading of this type vehicle was practiced and simulated casualties were transported cross country. Evacuation routes were set up for distances from five (5) to twenty five (25) miles with day and night problems in transportation of the sick and wounded conducted. The use of shuttle systems was employed.

Early in April, the battalion, less Ambulance Company Headquarters, one (1) platoon of Ambulance Company and one (1) platoon of Clearing Company, departed Camp Crawford, Hokkadio, Japan for permanent change of station at Camp Sendai, Honshu, Japan.


2

Chronological Discussion of Events for the Year, cont'd.

The remainder of the month was utilized in preparation of the new facilities for living and working quarters, inventory and requisitioning equipment after the move and training and review of basic military and medical subjects. Several enlisted men were enrolled at Medical Department's Technicians School, Osaka General Hospital, Osaka, Japan and Air Transportability School, Matsushima Air Base.

During May and throughout the second quarter of the year particular effort was directed towards raising the Combat Effectiveness of the battalion. A complete review of each man's MOS was conducted by a board of three officers. School quotas were secured for Food Service, Radio, Motor Maintenance, Medical Technicians and Air Transportability Schools. Due to the limited facilities available in the Sendai area and the great number of individuals absent from the battalion at dispensaries and other posts to allow for battalion level exercises more emphasis was placed on small unit and individual training.

The coin at effectiveness of the battalion was raised higher in June by the inclusion of Amphibious Warfare Training in the program. The unit was also rated high on a field test given on overnight bivouac and 25 mile road march. By the end of June there were approximately seventeen (l7) Army Nurses assigned to the medical battalion with Captain Lucille I Fowler, ANC, as Chief Nurse. The Nurses were placed on detached service throughout the division area at dispensaries and the hospital operated by the battalion. They were a great asset to the unit especially working at installations where dependents were cared for. Their presence added a certain amount of professional finesse to the care and medical treatment given. During this second quarter of the year a Republic of Korea medical officer by the name of Major OH, HYUNG-SUCK was assigned to the battalion for the purpose of observing the activities of an Infantry Division Medical Battalion. During his stay he visited all the medical installations in the division from Battalion Aid Stations through Clearing Stations and actually participated in the Hokkaido Task Force Exercises.

With the outbreak of hostilities in Korea, the battalion found itself beginning the month of July with greater occupational responsibilities than ever before. Platoons were detailed to take over areas from Kyushu to Hokkaido, Japan, that had formerly been occupied by divisions called to action in Korea. Prior to assuming these duties the battalion was able to celebrate its tenth anniversary of organization on the first of July and at the same time to bid farewell and good luck to the battalion commander Major Matthew J. Kowalsky, MSC, who was departing for duty with Headquarters EUSAK. On 13 July 1950, Major Oren C. Atchley, OXXXXX, MSC, assumed command of the battalion. During the remainder of July the battalion was employed throughout Japan operating the hastily left medical facilities and in southern Kyushu evacuating the wounded from ships and planes and transporting them to hospitals and trains. Medical Corps and Medical Service Corps officers were called from the unit for duty in Korea at the first part of the month but by the end of the month were being replaced and the unit officer requirements brought up to strength.

The first week in August found those units of the battalion which were still at Camp Sendai preparing for a move to the Camp Fuji Maneuver area for the purpose of reassembling the battalion and training on a divisional level. The battalion departed Camp Sendai on 7 August and within a week after arrival at Camp Fuji was assembled as an entire battalion for the first time since its employment in Japan.


3

Chronological Discussion of Events or the Year, cont' d.

Immediately the unit commenced a program of activities that would bring it into condition for combat in Korea. Inventory of all Individual Clothing and Equipment and Organizational Equipment was conducted. Personnel replacements were received. Personal affairs for all members were put in order. A 16 hour a day training schedule was effected with physical and mental conditioning stressed. Road marches, day and night, at least four (4) times a week were taken. This strenuous routine seven days a week continued throughout the remainder of the month.

At the end of the first week in September, exactly a month after the arrival of the battalion at Camp Fuji, the unit was in shape for combat. On 7 September the battalion departed by rail from Camp Fuji for the Yokohama Port of Embarkation to board the USNS General Randall. The ship sailed at 0500 11 September. After the ship was out on the high seas the staff and company commanders were informed they were to take part in "Operation Goldrush"-the invasion of Inchon on 15 September. Elements of the division were to go ashore on "D" Day plus one (1). The voyage was uneventful and the ship arrived at Inchon Harbor on 16 September.

At 1900 hours, the 19th of September, the unit debarked from the USNS General Randall aboard an LST and landed at Yellow Beach Inchon at 2320 hours, same date. Personnel were put ashore without vehicles and marched approximately four (4) miles to an assembly area. While awaiting the unloading of vehicles the unit was located in abandoned buildings. Because of the difficult tides it was three days before any of the vehicles were unloaded.

The first group of vehicles arrived at 0400 22 September and by 1400 hours that day the First Platoon of Clearing Company and Second Platoon of Ambulance Company departed in support of the 32d RCT. They located in an abandoned brewery building at Anyang-ni and received their first patient at 1900 hours the same day. Initially there were no facilities for evacuation to the rear but within a short time the limited facilities of the 1st Marine Hospital were made available to the division. This installation soon became filled and it was necessary to evacuate direct to the beach where the patients were loaded aboard LSTs and shipped to the Hospital Ship Consolation anchored off shore from Inchon. This system proved very unsatisfactory because immediate loading of the LSTs were handicapped by the difficult tide conditions and resulted in a long wait for the seriously wounded before they could be given definitive treatment. This situation was relieved when the 121st Evacuation Hospital and the 4th Field Hospital became operational on 26 September and the flow of casualties to those rear facilities proceeded very smoothly.

As the 32d swung north and made their way towards the Han River and into Seoul the Second Platoon Clearing Company was committed in their support with the first platoon remaining operational in the same location to support the 31st RCT committed south of Anyang-ni in the drive for Suwon. The First Platoon of ambulance company provided evacuation for the 31st RCT.


4

Chronological Discussion of Events for the Year, cont'd.

When the 2d Clearing Platoon moved up in support of the 32d RCT they located at Chongami and it was here they encountered a difficult problem in caring for civilian casualties. There were hundreds of men, women and children wounded in the liberation of Seoul and they were brought in droves to the Clearing Station. Military casualties became increasingly heavy so the 3d Clearing Platoon was brought up to augment the 2d Platoon. At times, the stations were under enemy artillery and sniper fire with one 2˝-ton truck receiving a direct hit. With reference to the civilian casualties they were mostly serous type injuries, many amputees or extensive surgical cases. Most wounds were several days old and badly infected. This problem was alleviated by the procurement of two (2) Korean civilian doctors and nurses. A wing of a school house was turned over to them with our furnishing all the necessary medical supplies and equipment and supervising their functions. One (1) medical officer and thirteen enlisted men went into Seoul to set up and organize civilian medical facilities. This action so relieved the situation that the 3d Platoon was withdrawn and placed in reserve with the battalion and company headquarters at Anyang-ni.

On the 4th of October the fighting in the division sector had ceased and all the clearing and ambulance platoons were withdrawn from the RCTs and located with the remainder of the battalion at Anyang-ni. In review of the functions of the battalion in "Operation Goldrush" it became apparent that a lot was learned and many problems and difficulties were solved. The three platoons of both ambulance and clearing company proved they could adequately support operations of regimental or larger type unit size. Excellent liaison was maintained and no unit of the battalion ever experienced difficulty due to lack of medical or general supply, rations or mail. During this operation the continuing and constant maintenance of ambulances paid off as not one vehicle was lost due to mechanical failure. Initially the ambulances were in constant use as all the evacuation to the rear from the clearing stations was provided by battalion ambulances. The assignment of the 1st Platoon, 560th Ambulance Company, 163d Medical Battalion, X Corps, on the 25th of September relieved this situation.

The 1st Mobile Army Surgical Hospital was attached to the battalion on 7 October. The following day the battalion plus an ambulance platoon and the hospital unit attached, departed for Pusan, Korea. The convoy was ambushed en-route and suffered several casualties. Herioc efforts on the part of members of the battalion in rescue and care of the wounded has resulted in one (1) officer being awarded the Bronze Star Medal with "V" device for valor and four (4) others awaiting action on award of the Silver Star Medal.

The unit arrived at Pusan on the 10th of October and bivouacked outside the city. While there, extensive training was given in use of cold weather clothing and precautions to be taken by the Individual in prevention of cold injury to himself. The classes were presented by a Department of the Army Quartermaster team. Results to this date have been excellent; not one casualty in the medical battalion to this date has been as a result of cold weather.

On 16 October the battalion, less one (1) platoon of Clearing and one (1) platoon of ambulances attached for medical support to the 17th RCT, departed Pusan aboard the USNS General E. D. Patrick. The destination was Iwon, Korea, with the 17th RCT making the initial assault amphibious landing. The First Platoon ambulance and clearing company landed on 31 October in their support.


5

Chronological Discussion of Events of the Year, cont'd.

The remainder of the battalion debarked at Iwon on 4th November and marched approximately eight (8) miles to a bivouac area. The following day the battalion and attached units, less the 3rd Clearing Platoon who established a station on the Iwon Beach and the 2nd Ambulance Platoon in their support, moved to Pukchong, Korea. On arrival, the 2nd Clearing Platoon established a Division Clearing Station. The 1st Mobile Army Surgical Hospital set up adjacent to them in their support. Once these units were established at Pukchong the 3rd Clearing Platoon ceased shore to ship evacuation at Iwon and evacuation began to the 121st Evacuation Hospital at Hamhung.

The 1st Clearing Platoon continued in support of the 17th RCT in their northward drive for the Yalu River. When the 1st Clearing Platoon left Pungsan for Kapsan the 3rd Clearing Platoon took over their clearing station site in order to provide an intermediary station for medical care for patients while enroute to Pukchong from the vicinity of the Yalu River and also for support of the 31st and 32nd RCTs. The route of evacuation was as follows: Over the MSR from Medical Collecting Station at Hyesanjin to the 1st Clearing Platoon at Kapsan, a distance of forty (40) miles. From Kapsan, the evacuation continued to Pungsan, a distance of forty two (42) miles to the 3rd Clearing Platoon. Leaving the station at Pungsan the evacuation proceeded over mountainous and difficult terrain to Pukchong where the 2nd Clearing Platoon and 1st Mobile Army Surgical Hospital were operating, a distance of sixty eight (68) miles. After treatment at Pukchong, casualties were further evacuated to the 121st Evacuation Hospital at Hamhung, a distance of eighty (80) miles. Therefore, ambulances under the battalion had approximately two hundred and thirty (230) miles to travel in transporting casualties one way. Evacuation and maintenance of vehicles was a 24 hour problem. Extremely cold weather was encountered, the temperature at times dropping to 24 degrees below zero.

While operations were being conducted north of Pungsan the battalion commander, Major Atchley, in order to effect more control over operations established a forward Command Post at Pungsan. During this period an ambulance carrying patients became lost and while in search of it, the battalion commander and five (5) enlisted men became missing in action. Only two (2) of the enlisted men have since been recovered. Major John E. Pleasants, DC, then temporarily assumed command of the battalion on or about 27 November 1950.

The battalion received orders to withdraw from Northeast Korea on 1 December. On the following day the battalion, less the 2nd Clearing Platoon and the 1st Mobile Army Surgical Hospital who remained to support other elements of the division, moved by motor convoy to Hamhung. While at Hamhung, in addition to providing routine medical service to the division, the battalion assisted in transporting and caring for the wounded being flown out of the Chosin Reservoir area. The 2nd Clearing Platoon and the 1st Mobile Army Surgical Hospital arrived at Hamhung on the 5th of December. On the 11th of December, Major Robert S. Budge, MC, assumed command of the battalion.

The battalion was ordered to withdraw from the Hamhung area and on the 14th of December the battalion less a selected detachment, left behind, under the direction of the battalion commander, for the purpose of operating a Clearing Station and evacuating the wounded, departed for Hungnam Port and boarded the USNS General Freeman with destination Pusan. The detachment was relieved on the 19th of December by the medical battalion of the 3d Infantry Division and departed


6

Chronological Discussion of Events for the Year, cont'd.

Hungnam Port aboard the USNS General Mitchell for Pusan.

When the battalion arrived at Pusan they debarked and entrained for Toksong-dong where a Division Clearing Station was established on 20 December 1950.        

The battalion remained at Toksong-dong, the remainder of the year. The buildings and physical set up of the area, were the finest ones the unit had moved into since arrival in Korea. The Christmas and New Year holidays were enjoyed immensely by all. Especial efforts were put forth by the Chaplain, Company Commanders, NCOs and Food Service Personnel to pride and instill a true, enjoyable, and well earned rest and Yuletide holiday spirit for the members of the battalion. This brief respite was also an opportunity to conduct constructive critiques on previous operations; to reorganize and re-equip units; to accomplish administrative records and reports and to prepare for the next mission.

In summation of the activities of the 7th Medical Battalion for the year. 1950, it seems worthy of mention to note that during the entire commitments in Korea not one vehicle was ever lost because of mechanical failure or deficiency. Because of the difficulty of terrain, poor road conditions, the employment, usually of all three ambulance and clearing platoons at one time and the long distances to be covered the vehicles were in almost constant operation transporting patients and hauling supplies and equipment.

Personnel requirements were nearly always adequate. The assignment of two Naval Reserve Medical Officers, MOS: 3150 (Surgeon, General) relieved the shortage in that specialty. The Division Neuropsychiatrist working at Clearing Station level is a definite asset.

The morale of the command throughout the year was excellent and despite tactical reversals "esprit de corps" of all members was high and manifested by their display of ability to overcome cheerfully, difficult obstacles and problems hampering or harassing their mission.

Likewise, the health of the command has been excellent. There were no unusual incidents of communicable diseases.

SECTION II

RECAPITULATION OF STRENGTH BY MONTH

MONTH

OFFICERS

WARRANT OFFICERS

ARMY NURSE CORPS

ENLISTED MEN

January

21

1

0

253

February

21

1

0

275

March

22

0

0

280

April

23

0

0

272

May

23

0

3

268


7

Recapitulation of Strength by Month, cont'd.

MONTH

OFFICERS

WARRANT OFFICERS

ARMY NURSE CORPS

ENLISTED MEN

June

23

1

17

268

July

26

2

14

276

August

33

3

0

306

September

34

3

0

313

October

35

4

0

300

November

36

4

0

313

December

36

4

0

292

SECTION III

SUMMARY OF GENERAL SUPPLY ACTIVITIES

During the period 1 January 1950Hthru 11 August 1950, the Battalion Supply Section functioned at Camp Crawford, Japan on a normal basis with a steady flow of supplies being received from all Technical Services without interruption. Many items of T/O&E equipment were received during January and February which had been ordered during 1949. Winter clothing and equipment, including skiis, parkas and Weasels were drawn for winter training. Many major items of T/O&E equipment were not drawn for issue to the companies during this period due to the limited functions of the battalion. On 6 April 1950 the 7th Medical Battalion, less two platoons of Ambulance Company and one platoon of Clearing Company, moved to Sendai, Japan, a distance of approximately eight hundred (800) miles. This move placed a burden on the supply section in keeping the T/O&E equipment issued to the two widely scattered groups.

When the 7th Division was alerted for movement to the combat zone in Korea, the 7th Medical Battalion was moved to Camp Fuji, Japan, for the purpose of training and drawing the necessary T/O&E items to fully equip the battalion. The major items from all technical services were obtained without difficulty and issued to the various companies in the battalion. While at Camp Fuji, .45 caliber pistols and M-1 rifles were drawn and issued to the officers and enlisted men. After familiarization practice and cleaning, these weapons were crated and re-issued after landing at Inchon, Korea.

After arriving in Korea, on or about 19 September 1950, all supply services were contacted and within a matter of days a steady flow of supplies was obtainable. No major items of clothing and individual equipment were worn out or lost during the Inchon-Seoul operation. Expendable supplies were drawn from all services and issued to the companies regularly, and prior to debarkation for Pusan, Korea, in preparation for the Iwon invasion.

After the Iwon landing on 4 November 1950, the Battalion Supply Section was placed in operation at Pukchong, Korea. The immediate task there was to replace many items of clothing and individual equipment that was missing from the "A" bags loaded on the battalion vehicles being transported to Iwon. Some vehicles


8

Summary of General Supply Activities, cont'd.

had to be. partially unloaded in order to load them in the transports and many "A" bags were misplaced in this manner, however in many cases it was obvious that some had been rifled by persons unknown. These shortages were all made up without difficulty.

On or about 5 December 1950, all units of the battalion were ordered to proceed to the vicinity of Hamhung, Korea. This move was made under adverse conditions and the net result was the loss of some major items of T/O&E equipment, e.g., one complete kitchen truck and one complete electric lighting equipment set with trailer. The Ambulance Company of the battalion lost twelve (12) 3/4 ton truck 4x4 Ambulance (KD). Seven (7) of the above ambulances were lost in combat, two (2) were destroyed by Ordnance at Pukchong, Korea, when they were ordered to move to Hamhung and three (3) were evacuated to Japan by Ordnance due to the extensive repairs needed. The battalion moved to Hungnam area and while there a complete inventory was made by all companies and requisitions were submitted for all shortages. Approximately 25 to 30% of all T/O&E losses due to combat action or abandonment were received by 31 December 1950.

SECTION IV

SUMMARY OF MEDICAL SUPPLY ACTIVITIES

From January to August 1950 Medical Supply was maintained at Camp Schimnelpfennig, Sendai, Japan. This supply maintained an even flow of medical supplies to all army units on Northern Honshu plus T/O&E supplies to units on Hokkaido. A Medical Supply Point was maintained at Camp Crawford, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan to issue expendable supplies to army units on Hokkaido. Supplies were obtained from the Yokohama Medical Depot by monthly requisition and a sixty day level was maintained. No problems in procuring and issuing supplies were encountered.

Medical maintenance was affected by sending a maintenance man on periodic trips throughout the 7th Division or as required.

On the movement of the 7th Infantry Division to the Mt Fuji area the medical supply was closed at Camps Schimmelpfennig and Crawford and one medical supply was set up at Camp Fuji, Japan. All units and attached units of the 7th Infantry Division were brought up to full T/O&E and T/A. On departing Japan in September of 1950, all units had a ten day stock of medical supplies in their possession. Medical Supply carried a 15 day reserve stock.

After landing at Inchon., Korea 19 September 1950 medical supply was set up at Anyang-ni, Korea 23 September and began issuing supplies. Reapply was obtained from an advance platoon of the 8th Medical Depot by organic transportation. Whole blood was picked up daily at the Kimpo Air Base and distributed to the using medical installations.

Medical supply moved to Pusan, Korea in October and brought all units up to a 15 day medical supply level prior to leaving Pusan by ship.

After landing at Iwon, Korea, Medical Supply set up at Pukchong 5 November 1950.


9

Summary of Medical Supply Activities, cont'd.

Due to the advance position of some elements of the 7th Infantry Division they were supplied with one "Baldwin" airdrop. Additional supplies were sent to them by organic transportation.

Medical Supply left Pukchong and set-up near Hamhung on 5 December 1950. Resupply was obtained from an advance platoon of the 6th Army Medical Depot by organic transportation.

There were no problems encountered in procuring supplies and all units were resupplied by 30 December 1950.

Maintenance of Medical Equipment was furnished to the fullest possible extent under field conditions.

SECTION V

ANNUAL REPORT OF DENTAL SERVICE

At the beginning of 1950, the 7th infantry Divi6ion was located on Northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan. Major Ray B Jones, DC, was Division Dental Surgeon until 23 April 1950. He returned to the Zone of the Interior for reassignment. Effective with his departure Major John E. Pleasants, DC, assumed the responsibilities for the Division Dental Service. There were nine (9): dental officers on duty with the division and five (5) small dental clinics were in operation. The flow of equipment, and supplies, our greatest obstacle during 1949, was greatly improved and lack of sufficient personnel became our greatest problem. The following clinics were in operation at that time:

Camp Crawford, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan:

4 chairs, 4 units; 5 cabinets, 4 lamps, 1 X-Ray, 1 small prosthetic laboratory. Three dental officers.

Camp Schimmelpfennig, Sendai, Honshu, Japan:

4 chairs, 2 units, 2 cabinets, 4 lamps, 1 X-ray, 1 small prosthetic laboratory. Two Dental Officers.

Camp Haugen, Hachinohe, Honshu, Japan:

3 chairs, 2 units, 3 cabinets, 4 lamps, no prosthetic laboratory. Two Dental Officers.

Camp Younghans, Jinmachi Honshu, Japan:

2 chairs, 1 unit, 1 lamp, no prosthetic laboratory. One Dental Officer.

Camp Chitose, Chitose, Hokkaido, Japan:

1 chair, 1 fountain cuspidor, 1 cabinet, 1 lamp, no protthetic laboratory. One Dental Officer.

In August the division was moved to training area for regrouping, resupplying and training in preparation for the move to Korea.


10

Annual Report of Dental Service, cont'd.

This was the first time that the 7th Medical Battalion had operated as a battalion in Japan. During the month seven new dental officers were assigned and one reassigned to a new station, leaving a total of fifteen. All dental officers remained assigned to the medical battalion but were put on detached service In the following manners three with each regiment, two with Division Artillery and. four with the battalion, i.e., one per dental laboratory truck, and one per each clearing platoon. At this time an attempt was made to survey the division and try to eliminate all Class I cases prior to our departure for Korea.

After the division entered combat in Korea, it was discovered that the placement of dental officers with various units had, to be shuffled to meet the changing conditions. We found during combat, an infantry regiment required one dental officer and in a rest area at least three were required with each regiment. It was also discovered that dentists during combat was limited to emergency treatment and the dental officers have been utilized to augment medical staff officers in bandaging and treating wounds in the regimental collecting stations and medical battalion clearing stations. It was found to be advantageous to have at least one dental officer with the Replacement Company at all times and as many as three at other times in order to eliminate Class I cases prior to their joining a unit. Consequently there has been a constant change of dental officers to units within the division.

The casualty rate of dental personnel has been very low in combat. One dental officer and two dental technicians are missing in action, none killed and none wounded.

At present time there are thirteen dental officers assigned and three attached. Field equipment is satisfactory.

SECTIOM VI

RECAPITULATION OF DENTAL SERVICES    

1. ADMISSIONS AND SITTINGS:

MILITARY

OTHERS

Admissions Routine-

4,927

426

Admissions emergency-

2,999

216

Sittings Given-

19,394

1,237

2. RESTORATIONS AND EXTRACTIONS:

MILITARY

OTHERS

Restorations-

10,667

730

Extractions-

4,785

286

Miscellaneous-

9,223

1,170

3.PROTHESIS:

MILITARY

OTHERS

Dentures Full-

106

0

Dentures Partial-

585

7

Total Prosthetic Operations-

1,474

38


4. CLASSIFICATION OF MIL PERS BEGINNING AND CLOSE OF YEAR:

(Figures are percentage of command strength)


11

Classification of Mil Pers Beginning and Close of Year, cont'd.

 

CLASS I

II

III

IV

January

5.7

52.6

6.3

35.5

December

4.3

35.5

5.8

54.4

5. TOTAL DAYS OF DUTY:

Dental Officers - 4,222

SOURCE: National Archives and Records Administration, Record Group 112, Records of US Army Surgeon General, Historical Unit Medical Service (HUMEDS), File 319.1 (7th Medical Battalion) 1950.