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Foreword

A Decade of Progress - Contents

In war and peace, the United States Army Medical Department has served this country for as long as we have been a nation. The record of its achievements reflects the caliber of the leadership of the great physician-soldiers and administrators-Walter Reed, Gorgas, Letterman, Sternberg, and Darnall, to mention only a few-who shaped and honed the Medical Department into a superb service to support the American soldier and his dependents in the field or in garrison.

To that select list of greats in the history of the Medical Department, the Army and the Nation must proudly add the name of Lieutenant General Leonard D. Heaton. Appointed Surgeon General of the United States Army on 1 June 1959, four presidents showed their wisdom and foresight by retaining him in office. He rewarded them and this nation by leading the Medical Department to greater feats of prevention and cure, in the spirit of true humanitarianism, than history had previously recorded.

This historical survey, which recounts the various activities of the Army Medical Department from June 1959 to June 1969, was not written to emphasize the achievements of any one individual. But, as the story unfolds, it becomes clear that it was General Heaton's inspiring leadership that enabled the Medical Department to meet the great challenges of this tumultuous decade. Any account of the medical service General Heaton so splendidly led from 1959 to 1969 that ignored the influence of his ability and character on men and events would be a distortion of history.

Although certain portions of this study may be modified in time, it is believed that the timely publication of this survey of the various activities of the United States Army Medical Department in the period from 1959 to 1969 will benefit those officers who must resolve the problems of today and prepare the Medical Department to meet the problems of tomorrow.

HAL B. JENNINGS, Jr.,
Lieutenant General, United States Army,
The Surgeon General.