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Appendix G

The United States Army Medical Service Corps

Biographies of the Chiefs of the Medical Service Corps

Col. Othmar F Goriup

September 1947-August 1951

Col. Othmar F Goriup, a graduate pharmacist and fellow of the American College of Apothecaries, was appointed the first Chief of the Medical Service Corps on 24 September 1947, serving until 1951 in that capacity. His pharmacy background was an important factor in his selection. The Surgeon General, Maj. Gen. George Armstrong, believed it was "gratifying to the pharmaceutical profession."

Born in Graz, Austria, in 1905, Goriup had come to the United States in 1915 at the age of ten. He was certified as a pharmacist upon completion of training at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1929. He received a B.S. in chemistry from St. Bonaventure College, New York, in 1939. He was commissioned in the Medical Administrative Corps Reserve in 1933 and entered active duty in 1941 as the Executive Officer of the station hospital at Langley Air Field, Virginia. This was followed by assignments as the Administrative Assistant to the Surgeon of the Air Transport Command in Washington, D.C., and as Chief of the Supply and Operations Division, Headquarters, Air Transport Command. In the latter capacity he planned and implemented the medical organization for the Air Transport Command. Goriup was serving in the Office of the Air Surgeon on the War Department Staff when selected as Chief of the Medical Service Corps. He said that when he left the air staff and moved to the Army Surgeon General's Office it was unfamiliar territory.

After his tour as Chief, MSC, he served as the Executive Officer of five Medical Department organizations: Medical Field Service School, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Chief Surgeon's Office, Far East Command, Tokyo, Japan; Station Hospital, Camp Zama, Japan; Forest Glen Annex, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.; and The Historical Unit, Office of the Surgeon General, Washington, D.C. Colonel Goriup retired from the Army in


478

1960. He died in 1980 in Silver Spring, Maryland. His son, Lt. Col. Franklin J. Goriup, USA, Ret., was also an MSC. He passed away in 1989.

Source: Goriup in THU, OTSG, Rpt, sub: AEB for MSC History, 13 November 1958; THU, OTSG, biographical summary, 30 September 1960; Goriup, Standard Form 57, Application for Federal Service, 30 December 1961; Obituary, Washington Post, 3 August 1980; Roderick M. Engert, USACMH, biography, May 1981, all in DASG-MS; Goriup Bio File, folder 25, box 14/18, MSC-USACMH.


479

Col. Robert L. Black
September 1951-March 1955

Col. Robert L. Black replaced Col. Othmar F. Goriup as Chief of the Medical Service Corps during the first year of the Korean War. Black was born in Channing, Texas, in 1903 and enlisted in the Army in 1925 after graduation from high school and a variety of jobs including service as an ordinary sailor in the Merchant Marine. He successfully competed for one of four Medical Administrative Corps vacancies in 1928 and reported to Fitzsimons General Hospital, Denver, Colorado, as its medical supply officer. In 1929 he was assigned to the Schofield Barracks Station Hospital in Hawaii. There, as the sole Medical Administrative Corps officer, he served as medical supply officer, adjutant, mess officer, registrar, troop commander, recreation officer, and summary courts officer. Later, in 1937, he became the medical supply officer at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where he replaced a physician.

In 1941, at the time of Pearl Harbor, Black was Chief of Finance and Supply in the Surgeon's Office, Headquarters, IX Corps Area, Presidio of San Francisco, California. He assumed command of the Medical Depot, Savannah, Georgia, followed by a move to Denver, Colorado, where he supervised construction of a medical depot and then became its first commander. He was assigned to the Supply Division, Surgeon General's Office, in 1942, with staff responsibility for operation of the twenty medical depots in the United States. In November 1944 he was reassigned as Chief of Supply, Office of the Surgeon, United Kingdom Base of the European Theater, which was initially responsible for providing 150,000 hospital beds in support of the invasion of Europe and later with closing hospital units after the defeat of Germany.

In July 1945 Black became the Chief of Supply, Surgeon's Office, European Theater. He returned to the United States in 1946 to attend the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, followed by assignment as Medical Supply Officer, General Distribution Point, San Antonio, Texas. Colonel Black returned to the Surgeon General's Office in 1948 as the Assistant Chief of the Personnel Division.

Colonel Black was a hospital administrator for eighteen years following his retirement from the Army in 1955, including employment at the United Mine Workers Hospital in Harley, Kentucky; the California Rehabilitation Center, Santa Monica, California; and the Community Hospital of Hollywood, California. He died in 1992 in Palm Springs, California.


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Source: OTSG, Medical Service Corps History Project, "Panel Discussion With Former Chiefs of the Medical Service Corps," Washington, D.C., 6 May 1983, DASG-MS; Col. Robert L. Black, USA, Ret., interview with Lt. Col. Michael C. Baker, MSC, Palm Springs, California, 7 March 1984, Project 84-16, Senior Officers Oral History Program, U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania; Black to Parker, 17 May 1960, MSC-USACMH; Black to Ginn, 24 December 1984, DASG-MS.


481

Col. Bernard Aabel

April 1955-June 1959

Col. Robert L. Black was succeeded by Col. Bernard Aabel. Aabel was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1907. He received a B.S. in pharmacy from the University of Minnesota in 1932 and entered the pharmaceutical business. He was commissioned in the Medical Administrative Corps in 1940 and entered active duty in 1941. He was a graduate of the Army War College.

Aabel landed on OMAHA Beach in 1944 as the S-2 of the 68th Medical Group and was wounded that October. His postwar assignments included Deputy Commander of the Medical Replacement Center at Camp Pickett, Virginia, and duty with the Surgeon General's Personnel Division, Washington, D.C. There, as a Pharmacy Corps major, he testified in support of formation of the Medical Service Corps. His performance was such that Senator Millard E. Tydings of Maryland recommended Aabel's appointment as chief of the new corps. In 1948 Aabel became the Assistant Military Attaché in Helsinki, Finland, following training duty with the Intelligence Division of the Army Staff. He was promoted to colonel in 1950 on the tenth anniversary of his entry on active duty and received Finland's Order of the White Rose for his attaché duty in 1951.

When selected Chief of the Medical Service Corps, Colonel Aabel was serving as Chief of the Surgeon General's Officer Procurement Branch. He continued to serve in that role, thereby starting a precedent of "dual-hatting" the Chief of the Medical Service Corps. After his term as Chief, Aabel became the Surgeon General's liaison officer to the Central Intelligence Agency. He retired from the Army in 1962.

At the time of his death in 1968 Aabel was director of the American Medical Association's International Health Department at the AMA's headquarters in Chicago. In 1972 the Secretary of the Army named the administration building of the new Academy of Health Sciences (successor to the Medical Field Service School) Aabel Hall.

Source: Norman D. Moore, biography of Aabel, THU, OTSG, May 1968, DASG-MS; DA, HQ Fort Sam Houston, Texas, GO 136, 15 November 1972, Stimson Library, AHS; U.S. Congress, House, Committee on Armed Services, Hearings on H.R. 1982 "To Establish a Permanent Medical Service Corps in the Medical Department of the Regular Army," 80th Cong., 1st sess., beginning 20 February 1947, see 12 March 1947 (Aabel biography); "Froehlke to Speak-Army Secretary," Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, 9 December 1972.


482

Col. Roy D. Maxwell

July 1959-February 1963

Col. Bernard Aabel was succeeded in 1959 by Col. Roy D. Maxwell, a nuclear medicine specialist and the only officer of the Medical Allied Sciences Section appointed Chief of the Medical Service Corps. Maxwell was born in 1907 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and received a B.A. from Oklahoma City University in 1930. He received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Iowa and was a chemistry professor when he was commissioned in the Sanitary Corps in 1941. He was a 1945 Command and General Staff College graduate and was the author of journal articles on organic chemistry and radiochemistry. He was a pioneer in the use of radioisotopes in biochemical studies.

Maxwell's first assignment was as Chief of the Biochemistry Section of the Fifth Service Command Laboratory at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. There he served from 1941 to 1946 as chief of the biochemistry section, as well as detachment commander, adjutant, and executive officer. After the war Maxwell was the radiological safety officer for the Bikini nuclear weapons tests. He then undertook postgraduate work in radiochemistry and biophysics at the University of California. From 1949 to 1951 he was Chief of the Department of Biophysics at the Army Medical Service Graduate School in Washington, D.C. (later the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research). He next became Chief of the Physiology and Pharmacology Division. From 1955 to 1957 he was Chief of the Fallout Study Group, Weapons Effects Division, of the Headquarters, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project.

When Colonel Maxwell was appointed Chief of the Medical Service Corps he was Special Assistant for Nuclear Warfare Instruction and Casualty Studies to the Commandant of the Army Medical Service School. While serving as Chief of the Corps, Maxwell was appointed to a special project with the Atomic Energy Commission, duties that occupied him fully beginning in August 1962. Col. Dale L. Thompson, Executive Officer of the Personnel Division, served as Acting Chief of the Corps in Maxwell's absence, beginning 7 August 1962. Maxwell retired from the Army in 1963. He died in 1993 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Source: Technical Liaison Division, OTSG, biography, February 1962; Maxwell, Ginn interview, Washington, D.C., 5 December 1983; OTSG, Special Orders No. 30, 7 August 1962, all in DASG-MS.


483

Brig. Gen. William A. Hamrick

March 1963-July 1969

Col. William A. Hamrick was born in 1912 in Vernon, Indiana. He took office in March 1963 and served as Chief of the Medical Service Corps for the next six years, a period that included the Army buildup in Vietnam. Hamrick attended Oklahoma Military Academy from 1928 to 1932, graduating as the outstanding military cadet with a certificate that allowed commissioning as a second lieutenant when he reached the age of twenty-one. Following graduation from Oklahoma A&M College in 1934, he was commissioned in the Infantry and served on active duty with the 2d Infantry Division from 1936 to 1937. In 1940 he was recalled to active duty at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, as a classification officer at the reception center where he made initial assignments for newly enlisted soldiers. He served in a variety of assignments as an Adjutant General Corps officer. In 1946 he was accepted as a lieutenant colonel for Regular Army integration into the Medical Service Corps.

In 1950 Hamrick went to Korea as the Personnel Officer for the Eighth Army Surgeon. He returned to the United States as the Executive Officer, Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, from 1951 to 1952, followed by duty in Washington, D.C., with the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Personnel. In 1956 he completed the Army-Baylor University Program in Hospital Administration and became the program's director, followed by a tour as the Executive Officer for the Surgeon, U.S. Army, Europe. He was a fellow of the American College of Hospital Administrators (later, the American College of Healthcare Executives). When selected as Corps Chief in 1963, Hamrick was the Executive Officer of William Beaumont General Hospital, El Paso, Texas. He became the first general officer in  the Medical Service Corps on 10 November 1966. General Hamrick passed away in San Antonio, Texas, in 1995.

Source: Technical Liaison Division, OTSG, biography, 21 September 1988, DASG-MS.


484

Brig. Gen. Manley G. Morrison

August 1969-August 1973

Brig. Gen. William A. Hamrick was replaced by Brig. Gen. Manley G. Morrison in 1973. He was serving as the Executive Officer for the Surgeon General's Comptroller when appointed Chief of the Medical Service Corps.

Morrison was born in Weston, West Virginia, in July 1915. When Japan attacked Pearl Harbor he was executive chief steward for the Union Pacific Railroad at Sun Valley, Idaho. The railroad had promoted him to that rank at the age of twenty-seven. His promotion to division superintendent (a position normally reached after the age of sixty) exempted him from the draft. He never ceased being very proud of a promotion which he believed was "higher than I ever attained in the military service as far as status was concerned- including Chief of the Corps."

Volunteering for military service, Morrison was assigned to Army hospital food service due to his experience in hotel and food service management. He was commissioned in the Medical Administrative Corps at Camp Barkeley, Texas, in 1942 for duty in hospital food service, but he had no connection with that field after his initial assignment in a medical battalion. Morrison found that the Army's food service system precluded the possibility of preparing food tastefully. Its sanitation rules required keeping meat absolutely frozen until served, and one of his vivid memories was watching the cooks chopping beef carcasses apart with fire axes so they could get the meat into the oven.

Morrison's career covered assignments in a wide range of administrative specialties, including logistics, plans and training, registrar and comptroller. His World War II duty included Medical Supply Officer, 636th Clearing Company, and S-3, 430th Medical Battalion, Ninth Army. His postwar assignments included Registrar, Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, California; Chief of Medical Statistics, Office of the Surgeon, U.S. Army, Europe; Comptroller, Walter Reed Army Medical Center; Army Staff duty in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics; and Chief of the Special Projects Office of the Surgeon General's Office; followed by another tour in Europe as Executive Officer for the Surgeon, U.S. Army, Europe. He completed a B.S. in military science at the University of Maryland in 1958 and an M.A. in public administration at American University in 1960. He was a graduate of the Army Command and General Staff College regular (resident) course and of the Army War College.

Source: Technical Liaison Office, OTSG, biography, August 1969; Public Affairs Office, OTSG, official biography, September 1971; Morrison, Ginn interview, Washington, D.C., 7 May 1983, all in DASG-MS.


485

Brig. Gen. John E. Haggerty

August 1973-September 1977

Brig. Gen. Manley G. Morrison was succeeded by Brig. Gen. John E. Haggerty, who came to Washington in 1973 from Denver, Colorado, where he was serving as Director of the Office of the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS). General Haggerty's concurrent appointment as the Surgeon General's Director of Resources Management, another Medical Department general officer position, returned the Medical Service Corps Chief to a "dual-hatted" position. He was commissioned in the Medical Administrative Corps (MAC) in 1942 from the Officer Candidate School, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, and was familiar to thousands of MAC officers as an OCS company commander at Camp Barkeley, Texas.

Haggerty was born in 1918 in Reading, Massachusetts. He received a B.S. from the University of Maryland and a law degree from Suffolk University Law School. His assignments included executive officer of two Army hospitals and of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command. Staff duty included assignments to the Army General Staff in the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 (Logistics), the staff of the Surgeon, U.S. Army, Europe, and as Plans and Operations Officer on the joint staff of the Surgeon, United States Pacific Command, Hawaii. He was a graduate of the Army's Command and General Staff College regular course and of the Army War College.

When Haggerty retired in 1977 he became the administrator of the New England Primate Center, Harvard University, where he found a certain pleasure in working with monkeys. "They might bite, but they don't talk back and never ask for overtime pay." In 1978 the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States-a society of federal health agencies established in 1891 and incorporated by Congress in 1903-awarded Haggerty the Ray E. Brown Award for outstanding accomplishment in federal health care management.

Source: Resume, 30 September 1977, and Haggerty, Ginn interview, Washington, D.C., 7 May 1983, both in DASG-MS; MSC Newsletter, 1 December 1978.


486

Brig. Gen. James J. Young

October 1977-September 1981

Brig. Gen. John E. Haggerty was succeeded in October 1977 by Brig. Gen. James J. Young, who was serving in the Surgeon General's Office as the Deputy Director of Resources Management. Young also replaced Haggerty as Director of Resources Management, a continuation of the practice of "dual-hatting" the Medical Service Corps Chief.

Young was born in Fort Ringgold, Texas, in 1926. He was commissioned in the Medical Administrative Corps in 1947 through the Fort Benning Infantry OCS after a short period as an enlisted artillery soldier. He later earned an M.S. in military science from the University of Maryland, an M.H.A. through the Army-Baylor Program, and a Ph.D. in health care administration from the University of Iowa. His principal assignments included staff officer duty at Department of the Army and joint staff levels; Chief of Plans and Operations for the Surgeon, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam; and Executive Officer of the U.S. Army Hospital, Fort Ord, California. From 1973 to 1975 he served as the Army representative and senior military analyst on the presidentially mandated Military Health Care Study conducted by the Department of Defense, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and the Office of Management and Budget. The Report of the Military Health Care Study, published in 1985, was a landmark tri-service review of the military health care system.

Following his retirement, Young became Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, State Board of Regents, West Virginia. In 1989 he became dean of the Medical School of the University of Texas at San Antonio. He was one of the few non­physician medical school deans in the United States.

Source: Resume of service career and curriculum vitae, 7 October 1981; Retirement ceremony program, 29 September 1981, The Pentagon; MSC Newsletter, 2 August 1982, all in DASG-MS.


487

Brig. Gen. France F. Jordan

October 1981-February 1984

Brig. Gen. James J. Young was replaced in October 1981 by Brig. Gen. France F. Jordan, who was serving as Director of Personnel for the Surgeon General and Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Department Personnel Support Agency, positions he retained when appointed Chief of the Medical Service Corps.

Jordan was born in Liberty, North Carolina, in 1934. He was commissioned in 1956 from the ROTC program at Davidson College, North Carolina. He was a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and of the regular course of the Command and General Staff College. His initial assignment was as a platoon leader, followed by duty as a company commander at the Medical Training Center of Brooke Army Medical Center. In 1958 he was selected as aide-de-camp to Maj. Gen. William E. Shambora, the medical center commander.

His subsequent assignments included duty with the Army General Staff; Deputy Chief of Staff for Plans and Operations, U.S. Army Medical Command, Vietnam; Chief, Operations Division, and later Executive Officer, U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command; Commander, 44th Medical Brigade; Deputy Director for Health Care Operations, OTSG; and Executive Officer for the Surgeon General. In May 1983, while serving as Chief of the Medical Service Corps, he was named Director of Resources Management, OTSG.

In 1984 the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States named Jordan as the first recipient of the Outstanding Federal Services Health Administrator Award. In January 1984 he was selected as the first MSC officer to fill the two-star billet of Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Medical Readiness, a position from which he retired in 1987. He received the Defense Distinguished Service Medal upon his retirement, as well as the United States Public Health Service Outstanding Service Medal.

Source: Curriculum vitae in MSC Newsletter, 20 November 1981, and in Jordan to Ginn, 25 April and 2 October 1988, all in DASG-MS.


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Brig. Gen. Walter F. Johnson III
March 1984-October 1988

Col. Walter F. Johnson III replaced Brig. Gen. France F. Jordan as Chief of the Medical Service Corps in March 1984. He began his tour in the rank of colonel since the Medical Service Corps star authorization was not initially augmented upon General Jordan's move to the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Johnson was promoted to brigadier general in October 1985 when a Medical Department star became available, making him the first black, the first paratrooper, and the youngest officer appointed as Chief of the Medical Service Corps. He was initially "dual-hatted" by retention in his position as Executive Officer to the Surgeon General. In October 1985 he was promoted to brigadier general and became the first Medical Service Corps officer appointed as the Surgeon General's Director of Health Care Operations.

Johnson was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1939. Commissioned from West Virginia State College ROTC, Johnson served his first tour as a medical platoon leader in the 82d Airborne Division. He held a master's degree in international relations from the University of Missouri. He was a graduate of the Command and General Staff College regular course and of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.

Johnson's assignments were concentrated in the operations field and included plans officer for the 44th Medical Brigade in Vietnam; instructor at the Medical Field Service School; Chief of the Plans, Force Structure, and Mobilization Branch of the Surgeon General's Office; and commander of the 2d Medical Battalion in Korea. In 1981 he was appointed to concurrent duty as Deputy Director of Personnel and Assistant to the Chief of the Medical Service Corps (General Jordan). This was followed by his appointment as Executive Officer for the Surgeon General, the position he was holding when appointed Chief of the Corps.

In 1988 the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States recognized General Johnson with its Outstanding Federal Services Health Administrator Award. He accepted a position with the American Hospital Association upon his retirement from the Army that year and became the association's senior vice president in 1991.

Source: Curriculum vitae, 1 March 1984; Department of the Army news release, 12 March 1984, both in DASG-MS.


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Brig. Gen. Bruce T. Miketinac
November 1988-July 1992

Brig. Gen. Bruce T. Miketinac replaced Brig. Gen. Walter F. Johnson as Chief of the Medical Service Corps and as the Surgeon General's Director of Health Care Operations on 1 November 1988, returning to Washington, D.C., from San Antonio, Texas, where he was the Deputy Commandant of the Academy of Health Sciences, U.S. Army. Miketinac was born in Escanaba, Michigan, in 1941 and was commissioned from the ROTC program at Saint Norbert College. He later earned a Master of Business Administration with a concentration in health care administration from the University of Notre Dame, where he also was class president. His military education included the regular course of the Army Command and General Staff College and the Army War College.

General Miketinac's first assignment upon entering active duty in 1963 was as medical operations assistant in the 2d Airborne Battle Group of the 82d Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and later, as company commander in the division's 307th Medical Battalion. He also served as the battalion S-2 (intelligence), S-3 (operations), and S-4 (logistics), His Vietnam service was as administrative officer for the Division Surgeon, 1st Cavalry Division. His specialty concentration was in personnel, and assignments included S-1 (personnel) for the 7th Medical Brigade, Ludwigsburg, Germany; Chief of the Human Resources Management Branch of the Academy of Health Sciences; and Chief of the Medical Service Corps Career Activities Office, U.S. Army Medical Personnel Support Agency, Washington, D.C. Other assignments included command of the 307th Medical Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, and command of the 44th Medical Brigade, both at Fort Bragg. His awards and decorations included the Legion of Merit, the Air Medal, the Combat Medical Badge, and the Master Parachutist Badge.

Source:Department of the Army, Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Biography, 1988, DASG-MS.


490

Brig. Gen. Jerome V. Foust

September 1992-October 1996

Brig. Gen. Jerome V. Foust succeeded Brig. Gen. Bruce T. Miketinac as Chief of the Medical Service Corps on 30 September 1992 and assumed the duty of Deputy Commander of the Army Medical Department Center and School the following month. In a break with tradition, he remained at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where he had been serving as the Post Commander (and the first MSC to command the post). He had previously been assigned to the same installation as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations of the Health Services Command (HSC). General Foust was born in Fort Smith, Arkansas, in 1943. He was commissioned through the ROTC program at Troy State University, Alabama, in 1966, and received a master's degree from Saint Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas. He was a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and of the U.S. Army War College.

General Foust's primary specialty was medical aviation. He served two tours in Vietnam with the 54th Medical Detachment and the 237th Medical Detachment Dustoff units. Other tours included Army Staff duty in the Pentagon from 1980 to 1984, Chief of Mobilization and Planning at HSC, Commander of the 326th Medical Battalion of the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), and instructor at the Academy of Health Sciences, Fort Sam Houston. He served as Commander of the 44th Medical Brigade of the XVIII Airborne Corps from 1989 to 1991, deploying the brigade in support of combat operations in Panama in 1989 and in the Persian Gulf in 1990. The brigade's Gulf War deployment consisted of 2 medical groups; 12 evacuation, combat support, and mobile Army surgical hospitals; 4 medical battalions; and 64 company- or detachment-size units totaling over 6,500 soldiers. Foust's awards and decorations included two awards of the Silver Star, the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, thirty-seven awards of the Air Medal, and the Combat Medical, Master Army Aviator, Parachutist, and Air Assault Badges.

Source: Health Services Command Mercury, October 1992, and biography, undated, both in DASG-MS.


491

Brig. Gen. Mack C. Hill

November 1996-

Brig. Gen. Mack C. Hill replaced Brig. Gen. Jerome V. Foust as Chief of the Medical Service Corps in November 1996. Hill was born in Florida, in 1942. He graduated from Florida A&M University in 1965 with a major in history, and earned a Master of Arts in management from Webster University in 1977. His military education included the resident Command and General Staff College and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces.

General Hill's specialty area was logistics, and after an initial assignment as a company commander in the Medical Training Center, Fort Sam Houston, he served in Vietnam as the Medical Supply Officer for the 9th Infantry Division. This was followed by assignments as medical supply officer of the 33d Field Hospital in Wuerzburg, Germany; the Academy of Health Sciences, Fort Sam Houston; and the U.S. Army Hospital, Fort Carson, Colorado. Other positions included Chief of the Logistics Division, 130th Station Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany; Chief of the Materiel Branch, 7th Medical Command, Heidelberg; Chief of the Plans, Doctrine, and Materiel Development Branch, Office of the Surgeon General; and Chief, Logistics Division, Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii. General Hill commanded the 47th Medical Supply, Optical, and Maintenance Battalion, Fort Hood, Texas, from July 1986 to August 1988, and the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency, Fort Detrick, Maryland, from July 1990 to June 1992. He was serving as the Director of Logistics, Office of the Surgeon General, when selected as Chief of the MSC. His awards and decorations included two awards of the Legion of Merit, the Purple Heart, and the Combat Medical Badge.

Source: Resume of service career and curriculum vitae, 20 March 1996; Officer Record Brief, 16 February 1996.